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Updated Outfield Rankings - H2H Points Leagues

As we enter the final stretch for drafting it is time to take a look at the latest iteration of points leagues rankings from our amazing hard working rankings staff. Starting with the outfield is always fun because there is so much depth at the position, especially if you only require three of them, as many points leagues do. However, even if your league has switched to five outfielders there is still a lot of value, both within the top-60 at the position and below.

Points leagues are always tough to assess because there are so many different variations that can be used. Many leagues use fairly similar settings, with slight variations when it comes to stolen bases or walks. However, some leagues really like to put a twist on certain elements. Therefore, it is crucial to know your league and then to use these rankings as a base to adjust off to optimize them for your draft.

Keep an eye out for all other positions to follow and without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 outfield points league rankings for March.

 

Outfield Tiered Ranks - H2H Points Leagues (March)

In case you missed it, our very own "Big Pick Nick" Mariano was recently named the #1 overall most accurate industry expert ranker for the 2018 season. You can see his secret sauce below! Additionally, industry legend Scott Engel recently joined the RotoBaller team and provides his insights as well. Scott is an FSWA Hall Of Famer and award winner.

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Mike Trout OF 1 1 1
2 1 Mookie Betts OF 2 3 2
3 1 J.D. Martinez OF 11 7 5
4 1 Christian Yelich OF 12 13 15
5 1 Bryce Harper OF 9 14 20
6 1 Ronald Acuna OF 16 16 17
7 2 Aaron Judge OF 27 29 12
8 2 Charlie Blackmon OF 30 34 29
9 2 Andrew Benintendi OF 34 36 31
10 2 Giancarlo Stanton OF 29 38 36
11 2 Kris Bryant 3B/OF 32 39 32
12 2 Juan Soto OF 36 30 40
13 3 Rhys Hoskins 1B/OF 39 43 39
14 3 George Springer OF 48 46 34
15 3 Starling Marte OF 37 53 51
16 3 Cody Bellinger 1B/OF 47 48 47
17 3 Khris Davis OF 31 58 54
18 3 Whit Merrifield 2B/OF 49 44 52
19 3 Lorenzo Cain OF 71 65 64
20 4 Eddie Rosario OF 61 75 78
21 4 Michael Brantley OF 87 66 71
22 4 Mitch Haniger OF 62 78 91
23 4 Tommy Pham OF 80 73 96
24 4 Aaron Hicks OF 76 86 87
25 4 Nicholas Castellanos OF 85 81 89
26 4 Justin Upton OF 67 97 94
27 4 Yasiel Puig OF 56 87 119
28 4 A.J. Pollock OF 96 101 76
29 5 Marcell Ozuna OF 83 93 108
30 5 David Peralta OF 110 119 84
31 5 Andrew McCutchen OF 115 104 107
32 5 David Dahl OF 111 106 123
33 5 Michael Conforto OF 106 117 130
34 5 Wil Myers 3B/OF 108 116 142
35 5 Joey Gallo 3B/1B/OF 90 122 158
36 5 Ender Inciarte OF 146 123 106
37 5 Brandon Nimmo OF 172 152 79
38 5 Dee Gordon 2B/OF 126 126 154
39 5 Victor Robles OF 128 136 156
40 5 Jesse Winker OF 160 155 113
41 6 Eloy Jimenez OF 137 146 151
42 6 Ryan Braun 1B/OF 141 165 131
43 6 Ian Desmond OF/1B 152 149 143
44 6 Mallex Smith OF 144 142 168
45 6 Kyle Schwarber OF 185 166 137
46 6 Harrison Bader OF 183 179 127
47 6 Stephen Piscotty OF 173 164 161
48 6 Nick Markakis OF 153 238 112
49 6 Nomar Mazara OF 175 183 210
50 6 Adam Eaton OF 159 167 260
51 6 Shin-Soo Choo OF 168 258 162
52 7 Jose Martinez OF/1B 271 192 140
53 7 Corey Dickerson OF 192 206 207
54 7 Austin Meadows OF 186 195 234
55 7 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 249 187 208
56 7 Odubel Herrera OF 243 220 182
57 7 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 244 212 201
58 7 Trey Mancini 1B/OF 198 230 230
59 7 Gregory Polanco OF 267 280 120
60 8 Domingo Santana OF 199 227 244
61 8 Hunter Renfroe OF 238 218 219
62 8 Max Kepler OF 206 217 255
63 8 Franmil Reyes OF 222 213 249
64 8 Ramon Laureano OF 217 224 246
65 8 Jackie Bradley Jr. OF 228 200 265
66 8 Nick Senzel 2B/3B/OF 253 216 #N/A
67 8 Byron Buxton OF 227 168 310
68 8 Billy Hamilton OF 290 193 241
69 8 Ian Happ 3B/OF 269 244 224
70 9 Manuel Margot OF 247 246 271
71 9 Randal Grichuk OF 256 273 237
72 9 Brandon Belt 1B/OF 236 322 218
73 9 Jake Bauers 1B/OF 261 255 279
74 9 Steven Souza Jr. OF 266 278 253
75 9 Brett Gardner OF 283 310 204
76 9 Matt Kemp OF 284 287 232
77 9 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 245 256 316
78 9 Brian Anderson 3B/OF 273 277 272
79 9 Teoscar Hernandez OF 306 301 216
80 10 Kevin Kiermaier OF 246 290 298
81 10 Cedric Mullins OF 278 284 292
82 10 Kevin Pillar OF 258 298 309
83 10 Adam Jones OF 376 291 225
84 10 Kyle Tucker OF 422 235 257
85 10 Kole Calhoun OF 310 375 262
86 10 Daniel Palka OF 338 324 294
87 10 Tyler O'Neill OF 326 314 #N/A
88 10 Christin Stewart OF 260 389 #N/A
89 10 Jason Kipnis 2B/OF 380 323 286
90 10 Jay Bruce OF/1B 415 282 #N/A
91 10 Josh Reddick OF 365 384 301
92 11 Franchy Cordero OF 349 356 #N/A
93 11 Avisail Garcia OF 354 309 401
94 11 Scott Schebler OF 433 349 288
95 11 Willie Calhoun OF 397 364 322
96 11 Mark Trumbo OF 325 403 #N/A
97 11 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 370 380 346
98 11 Leonys Martin OF 344 394 #N/A
99 11 Jorge Soler OF 371 388 373
100 11 Joc Pederson OF 428 338 369
101 11 Scott Kingery SS/3B/OF 394 392 359
102 11 Greg Allen OF 416 361 #N/A
103 11 Kike Hernandez 2B/SS/OF 435 343 #N/A
104 11 Lewis Brinson OF 389 425 365
105 11 Delino DeShields OF 438 348 #N/A
106 12 Adam Duvall 1B/OF 473 #N/A 317
107 12 Eric Thames 1B/OF 436 409 372
108 12 Albert Almora Jr. OF 437 #N/A 375
109 12 Carlos Gonzalez OF 464 450 307
110 12 Jason Heyward OF 385 470 376
111 12 Ben Zobrist 2B/OF 471 370 #N/A
112 12 Jake Cave OF 417 539 315
113 12 Raimel Tapia OF 395 520 360
114 12 Steven Duggar OF 410 443 #N/A
115 12 Pablo Reyes OF 427 #N/A #N/A
116 12 Alex Verdugo OF 525 386 384
117 12 Bradley Zimmer OF 425 553 336
118 12 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 455 523 350
119 12 Mac Williamson OF 443 #N/A #N/A
120 12 Yoenis Cespedes OF 458 544 333
121 12 Peter O'Brien OF 454 507 387
122 12 Mikie Mahtook OF 520 #N/A 379
123 12 Alex Gordon OF 418 491 #N/A
124 12 Jorge Bonifacio OF 463 #N/A #N/A
125 12 Hernan Perez 2B/3B/OF/SS 551 393 #N/A
126 12 Roman Quinn OF 479 466 #N/A
127 12 Hunter Dozier OF 484 463 #N/A
128 12 Michael Taylor OF 508 440 #N/A
129 12 Aaron Altherr OF 574 #N/A 377
130 12 DJ Stewart OF 434 550 #N/A
131 13 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 548 534 399
132 13 Blake Swihart C/OF #N/A 498 #N/A
133 13 Dexter Fowler OF 495 512 #N/A
134 13 Yairo Munoz 2B/3B/SS/OF 545 467 #N/A
135 13 Billy McKinney OF 474 540 #N/A
136 13 Nick Williams OF 461 556 #N/A
137 13 Derek Fisher OF 509 #N/A #N/A
138 13 Dustin Fowler OF 529 493 #N/A
139 13 Austin Hays OF 532 497 #N/A
140 13 Lonnie Chisenhall OF 492 546 #N/A
141 13 Chad Pinder SS/2B/OF 600 452 #N/A
142 13 Keon Broxton OF 552 511 #N/A
143 13 Tony Kemp OF 480 583 #N/A
144 13 Nick Martini OF 498 567 #N/A
145 13 Brandon Drury 3B/OF 547 #N/A #N/A
146 13 Travis Jankowski OF 616 484 #N/A
147 13 Austin Dean OF 555 #N/A #N/A
148 13 Phillip Ervin OF 542 571 #N/A
149 13 Clint Frazier OF 611 518 #N/A
150 13 Jarrod Dyson OF #N/A 573 #N/A
151 13 Howie Kendrick 2B/OF #N/A 578 #N/A
152 13 Jo Adell OF #N/A 584 #N/A
153 13 Victor Victor Mesa OF #N/A 589 #N/A
154 13 Gerardo Parra OF #N/A 590 #N/A
155 13 Curtis Granderson OF #N/A 591 #N/A
156 13 Magneuris Sierra OF 592 #N/A #N/A
157 13 Adam Engel OF 601 #N/A #N/A
158 13 Brett Phillips OF 648 563 #N/A
159 13 Jon Jay OF 623 595 #N/A
160 13 Robbie Grossman OF 619 #N/A #N/A
161 13 Charlie Tilson OF 643 #N/A #N/A
162 13 Melky Cabrera OF 645 #N/A #N/A

 

Outfield Points League Rankings: Upper Tiers

Tier One

There has been no change to this tier from January, and frankly for these six I could not phrase it any better than Nick did back then.

Even Harper's signing in Philadelphia did not move the needle in this format, because we already expected so much from him, given his high walk rate.

Tier Two

Again this is the same group as January, but with a slightly different order. Most people are scared off Judge in points leagues because of a 30% strikeout rate. However, his walk rate is high enough, and his upside great enough that he leads this tier.

The drop from eight to 12 for Soto is correct in my view. I love Soto, and his numbers last year were awesome, but at just 19 there are likely a couple of tough stretches ahead in 2019. He absolutely has the upside to be a Tier One hitter this time next year, but equally I think he has the most chance of falling a tier as well.

Benintendi's all around profile and discussions about being more of a contact hitter in 2019 make him a really interesting pick. Any worries you have about a loss of RBI leading off should be negated by the gain he will see in runs hitting in front of Betts and Martinez. It is the same story for Blackmon who is going to hit above a combination of Nolan Arenado, Daniel Murphy and Trevor Story. He just needs to offer average returns for his career at the other numbers and his run total will drag him close to the top-10.

Stanton and Bryant both had slightly off seasons in 2018, but both had legitimate cases. Stanton was making the switch to the AL and that can often bring some teething problems. If he gets it right in that park then 50 home runs could be more than possible, to package with 200 or more R+RBI. It doesn't matter how much you strikeout in a points league if you are returning those numbers on the other side. As for Bryant, he was hampered with a shoulder injury, but we know enough about what he can do healthy to trust him to finish somewhere close to the top-10.

Tier Three

This is a weird group for me. Hopefully, the move back to first base will focus Hoskins' mind and we can see him get his BB% back over 15%. In a stacked Phillies lineup all he has to do is consistently get on base and the R+RBI will sort themselves out, and the combination of that with a bump in OBP will make him a valuable points league contributor. The drop in power for Springer last season gives me some concerns, but at this stage, we know what floor he has and it is good enough to be right around the top-20 at the very least. However, if things do click then he has top-10 potential and that is why he deserves a ranking inside the top-15.

Marte's 6% walk rate does somewhat cap his ceiling when it comes to the points league format, where steals are valuable but not as valuable as in roto. However, he got back to hitting 20 home runs and is still capable of stealing over 25 bases, while having an average in the .280 region. When you add all of those things up then his value is good enough, but the lack of walks stops him having the upside of Springer and Hoskins. If you want upside then Bellinger is your man. A solid walk rate, combined with the ability to hit .260 and a potential 40 home run hitter is a lot of fun to own.

Merrifield is generally slightly overvalued in roto leagues but in points leagues, the sheer weight of what he can bring across the board is enough to put him in the top-20 discussion. I question if there is much upside above this ranking but in Kansas City where he should run plenty the floor is also safe enough. The increase in Cain's BB% last season helps his value, but I do worry we may see it regress back below 10%. If it does then the relative lack of RBI, and home runs, means that despite a good average and stolen bases the bottom of this tier might be the best return you can hope for from Cain.

 

Outfield Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Four

This tier has an interesting combination of names. My absolute favourites in the tier are Puig and Brantley. For Puig, it all comes down to the change in scenery. Nearly every park factor in Dodgers Stadium is below one, while in Cincinnati there is a sharp rise in the park factor for home runs and doubles. If Puig can combine that with getting his walk rate back close to 10% then we could be looking at a top-15 outfielder. I have some concern about the change in park for Brantley, but the depth of lineup surrounding him has increased so much that I can see him getting enough R+RBI to counteract any negative hitting effects. Of course, the concern is always injury with Brantley, but with a full 2018 season there is a reason to be optimistic.

Among the concerns in this tier are the aging Justin Upton, who has had injury concerns this spring, and Tommy Pham. Pham holds more value in roto leagues where he can contribute in most categories, but in points league his strikeout rate is somewhat of a concern. However, there was an interesting increase in exit velocity last season, which if he can maintain this season could make him a top-20 candidate. However, there is enough concern as the 23rd outfielder that I would look to stay away.

Tier Five

The values in this tier are Marcell Ozuna and David Peralta. Both offer similar strikeout to walk ratios as some of the players in the tier above and both should be able to contribute enough R+RBI to be values. Gallo is also interesting because despite the strikeouts the power and walks are superior to most you will find at this level. When you look at the overall picture, those almost cancel out and you are looking at a player who could contribute 200 R+RBI in a surprisingly versatile Rangers offense.

Dee Gordon is my big loser here. The steals options are only useful in this format f they can offer some power and Gordon cannot. Additionally, when Mallex Smith is healthy he could find himself stuck down in the ninth spot in the lineup.

Tiers 6 & 7

I really like Nomar Mazara here. We know his floor, as he has hit at least .250 with 20 home runs in each of the last three seasons. However, we also seen flashes, both in monthly performances and his exit velocity that there is a higher ceiling. His K:BB ratio is not great but at this stage of the draft it does not need to be.

Corey Dickerson is only a name you are really looking at if you need five outfielders in your points league. Much like Mazara, the K:BB ratio leaves something to be desired, but there are some promising trends, especially in his batting average. Hopefully, he can reverse the loss of power last season, and age 29 he should still be capable of getting to the 25 home run mark.

 

 

Outfield Points League Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tiers 8 and below

Max Kepler is a fun name, simply because if he can put it together in terms of connecting with the ball then his K:BB is nice at this stage of the draft. Three years of consistent home run production around the 20 mark is a solid floor and there is some talk he could hit at the top of the Twins order this season.

Jake Bauers is another name to consider. I went into depth on power in this recent article, but the keys for points league is that despite a rough season his BB% was high and he was a consistent solid OBP hitter in the minor leagues. In the late round of drafts, Bauers could prevent some solid upside.

 

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H2H Points League Pitchers - Overvalued & Undervalued

If a rotisserie fantasy baseball league had a younger brother, it would be the points league. Not that it’s necessarily inferior, but the points format is trying to make a name for itself after the roto leagues have paved the way for decades. It’s a setup that’s gaining some popularity as it pits you against your league-mates in a weekly head-to-head battle, comparable to fantasy football.

With most fantasy baseball articles referring to mainly 5x5 roto scoring, we’ll plunge into a few starting pitchers who have different values attached to them in a points league. There are no categories to balance out when drafting your roster, so managers need to focus on specific qualities in pitchers when deciding on who to select.

To determine a higher value for a pitcher, K-BB% and K/BB are essential statistics to study because in most points leagues a strikeout is worth the same as a walk. It is more valuable to have a pitcher with less strikeout potential if they can limit the free pass significantly better; that way he can accumulate more points. Innings-eaters are also more beneficial for your team considering more innings equal more points for your squad. Now that we understand these concepts a bit more let’s look at some overvalued and undervalued arms you’ll want to target or avoid in your points league.

 

Overvalued Starters - H2H Points Leagues

Jack Flaherty, St. Louis Cardinals

Jack Flaherty had a stellar rookie season in 2018, but some qualities downgrade him points leagues. He averaged just over 5.1 innings a start as the Cardinals kept him on a rather short leash a year ago. They will continue this approach with their prized hurler in 2019, limiting his potential for wins, and a larger accumulation of strikeouts. Flaherty’s 9.6% walk rate also would have finished among the league's bottom-seven in this category, further driving down his overall value in this format.

Rich Hill, Los Angeles Dodgers

The glaring concern with Rich Hill surrounds his inability to stay on the field. It’s a foregone conclusion that Hill will continue to ail from blister problems, not to mention any other pending issues that come with a 39-year-old body. The southpaw has failed to pitch more than 135 IP in over ten years, so we’re looking at a much lower ceiling for points than someone who will toss 180 IP. Hill will undoubtedly remain effective when on the mound, but missing about a third of the season could crush your goal of a championship if he's injured during or close to your playoffs.

Sean Newcomb, Atlanta Braves

One of the many young hurlers on the Braves team already making strides in the majors is Sean Newcomb. The left-hander has massive potential in the strikeout column, which drafters drool over in roto leagues. In a points setup, however, Newcomb’s ghastly 11.6% walk rate from last season proves he’s got control issues. His 11.4 K-BB% was a bottom-15 number in the bigs in 2018, canceling out the majority of his points earned from generating a strikeout. As with any young pitcher, Newcomb will have a cap on his innings as well in 2019. 180 IP figures to be a best-case scenario, and with control issues, he isn't as probable to pitch deep into games.

 

Undervalued Starters - H2H Points Leagues

Zack Greinke, Arizona Diamondbacks

Zack Greinke has lost the sexiness attached to his name from a few years ago, but that doesn’t mean he’s not a fantasy asset. He’s now eclipsed over 200 IP in four out of five seasons, making him an ironman of sorts in this day and age of baseball. While his peak strikeout days are behind him, Greinke is efficient with control as he finished in the top-10 in BB% in 2018 (5.1 BB%). He’s demonstrated a long track history of this command and an ability to rack up innings. These factors make him a suitable target as your SP2.

German Marquez, Colorado Rockies

Fantasy owners shy away from German Marquez in roto leagues because of the hitter’s paradise that he calls home. His swing-and-miss dominance can counter the inflated amount of runs that he may give up due to this fact. His 28.2% K-rate finished as 10th-best a year ago, and he has a strong history in the minors of minimizing walks. His 21.2 K-BB% in 2018 was impressive for a 24-year-old, but there’s absolutely room for growth in this category with more seasoning under his belt.

Ross Stripling, Los Angeles Dodgers

Ross Stripling is quickly developing into a favorite target in all types of fantasy leagues. A unique attribute that Stripling has is his SP/RP designation. In points leagues, relievers aren’t as necessary as you don’t need to search for saves like you do in a roto format. You can throw Stripling in an RP slot on your roster, and he can pile up more points than your standard RP2 or RP3 that you would have to choose in a roto league. Stripling also carried an impressive 22.7 K-BB% in 2018, good enough for an eighth-place finish among qualifying pitchers in 2018. Innings may be a concern, but in your RP slot, Stripling is a steal in value.

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Updated Second Base Rankings - H2H Points Leagues

Continuing on our points league tiered rankings analysis we move over to the keystone position. Second base has the deepest talent pool that it's seen in recent years as it’s full of elite bats at the top and high-upside youngsters in the lower tiers. With two games in the regular season already in the books, draft season is nearing an end, so we come at you with last-minute rankings and evaluations to soak in before the real Opening Day.

There is a vast discrepancy between points leagues and standard 5x5 roto formats. When using a points system, we need to account for walk and strikeout rates in more detail. It makes a significant difference to a player's value on how much more often they strikeout to how many times they walk as it counts for a point for, or against their numbers. K-BB% is a meaningful statistic to be aware of, and the lower the number, the better. If that number happens to be in the negatives, that’s considered the upper-echelon as only a handful of players reached this plateau in 2018.

Second base is full of thievery on the basepaths, which isn’t valued as highly in a points league. These rankings are a much different variation than roto leagues because of this overlooked detail. Using RotoBaller ranks gives you a considerable advantage over the rest of your league which will likely run off of a standard rankings list. Get to know the overvalued and undervalued players to dominate your points league draft.

 

Second Based Tiered Ranks - H2H Points Leagues (March)

In case you missed it, our very own "Big Pick Nick" Mariano was recently named the #1 overall most accurate industry expert ranker for the 2018 season. You can see his secret sauce below! Additionally, industry legend Scott Engel recently joined the RotoBaller team and provides his insights as well. Scott is an FSWA Hall Of Famer and award winner.

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill Auction $
1 1 Jose Ramirez 2B/3B 4 4 3 45
2 1 Jose Altuve 2B 28 22 11 34
3 2 Javier Baez 2B/SS/3B 53 40 49 24
4 2 Whit Merrifield 2B/OF 49 44 52 20
5 2 Matt Carpenter 1B/2B/3B 73 42 38 19
6 3 Daniel Murphy 1B/2B 77 71 72 17
7 3 Ozzie Albies 2B 81 80 81 17
8 3 Robinson Cano 1B/2B 97 83 82 17
9 3 Gleyber Torres 2B/SS 82 98 102 17
10 3 Jose Peraza 2B/SS 112 96 93 16
11 3 Travis Shaw 1B/2B/3B 117 91 97 15
12 4 Adalberto Mondesi 2B/SS 59 79 194 13
13 4 Brian Dozier 2B 121 115 110 13
14 4 Jonathan Villar 2B/SS 105 108 160 11
15 4 Dee Gordon 2B/OF 126 126 154 10
16 4 Rougned Odor 2B 123 138 159 9
17 4 Max Muncy 1B/2B/3B 162 111 150 9
18 5 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 196 130 125 9
19 5 Cesar Hernandez 2B 174 147 141 8
20 5 Yoan Moncada 2B 171 170 206 8
21 5 Jonathan Schoop 2B 197 181 171 7
22 5 Garrett Hampson 2B/SS 213 178 192 6
23 6 Yuli Gurriel 1B/2B/3B 214 214 172 6
24 6 Scooter Gennett 2B 240 215 160 5
25 6 DJ LeMahieu 2B 272 239 132 5
26 6 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 249 187 208 5
27 6 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 244 212 201 4
28 6 Nick Senzel 2B/3B/OF 253 216 #N/A 4
29 6 Asdrubal Cabrera SS/2B/3B 207 281 #N/A 4
30 6 Jeff McNeil 2B 313 265 214 2
31 7 Jed Lowrie 2B 361 234 205 2
32 7 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 245 256 316 1
33 7 Lourdes Gurriel Jr. 2B/SS 305 245 #N/A 1
34 7 Wilmer Flores 1B/3B/2B 191 396 #N/A 1
35 7 Starlin Castro 2B 301 328 287 1
36 7 Ian Kinsler 2B 288 353 299 1
37 7 Luis Urias 2B 399 354 235 1
38 7 Jason Kipnis 2B/OF 380 323 286 1
39 7 Johan Camargo 2B/3B/SS 400 332 258 1
40 7 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 370 380 346 1
41 7 Adam Frazier 2B 398 346 #N/A 1
42 7 Josh Harrison 2B 393 400 344 1
43 7 Isiah Kiner-Falefa C/2B/3B 475 342 323 1
44 7 Kike Hernandez 2B/SS/OF 435 343 #N/A 1
45 7 Ryan McMahon 1B/3B/2B 411 401 #N/A 1
46 7 Eduardo Nunez 2B/3B 477 406 368 1
47 7 Ben Zobrist 2B/OF 471 370 #N/A 1
48 7 Yolmer Sanchez 2B/3B 497 478 300 1
49 7 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 455 523 350 1
50 7 Keston Hiura 2B 491 441 400 1
51 7 Neil Walker 1B/2B 413 494 #N/A 1
52 8 Zack Cozart SS/2B/3B 476 438 #N/A 1
53 8 Kolten Wong 2B 446 476 #N/A 1
54 8 Joe Panik 2B 426 513 #N/A 1
55 8 Dustin Pedroia 2B 453 487 #N/A 1
56 8 Hernan Perez 2B/3B/OF/SS 551 393 #N/A 1
57 8 Brandon Lowe 2B 499 462 #N/A 1
58 8 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 548 534 399 1
59 8 Yairo Munoz 2B/3B/SS/OF 545 467 #N/A 1
60 8 Chad Pinder SS/2B/OF 600 452 #N/A 1
61 8 Devon Travis 2B 496 561 #N/A 1
62 8 Tyler Saladino 2B/SS 549 #N/A #N/A 1
63 8 Logan Forsythe 2B/3B 550 #N/A #N/A 1
64 8 Alen Hanson 2B 626 481 #N/A 1
65 8 Yangervis Solarte 2B/3B/SS 627 483 #N/A 1
66 8 Derek Dietrich 2B 641 499 #N/A 1
67 8 Howie Kendrick 2B/OF #N/A 578 #N/A 1
68 8 David Bote 2B/3B 580 #N/A #N/A 1
69 8 Wilmer Difo 2B 585 594 #N/A 1
70 8 Miguel Rojas 1B/2B/3B/SS #N/A 592 #N/A 1

 

Rankings Analysis - Top Tiers

Tier One

You can’t go wrong with either of these options as your starting second baseman in points leagues. Jose Ramirez has a slight edge over the other Jose, as his 15.2% walk rate vastly exceeded his 11.5% K-rate as he finished with the best K-BB% in the entire league (-3.7%). The odds are against Ramirez repeating his 39 HR output from a season ago, but he’ll likely exchange some of these round-trippers for doubles which will still accumulate points.

Jose Altuve battled injury for the first time in his career last season which has put a small damper against his ADP. He went four-straight years with at least 200 hits before 2018, and he should return to this form as long as his health cooperates. Altuve is a 5x5 roto threat which translates beautifully to a points league. He also has elite walk and strikeout rates (9.2%/13.2%), which makes him an overall beast in this format.

Tier Two

Of these second sackers, Baez, and Whit Merrifield will surely get selected off the board before Matt Carpenter, who is worth waiting for at his price. He had a huge power breakout in 2018 clubbing a career-high 36 homers while adding in 42 doubles for good measure. Carpenter will continue to hit at the top of a potent Cardinals lineup giving him ample opportunity to reach base and score runs which will consistently drive up his production.

Javier Baez is attached to an inflated ADP after his breakout 2018 campaign, which is destined to regress this season. He has a tremendous power/speed skill set which will still propel him to at least a top-10 points league finish at second base, but taking him at his cost could be harmful. Baez’ 21.4 K-BB% is among the league worsts and it doesn’t appear his approach at the plate is going to change anytime soon. This fact unquestionably devalues him in this league setup.

Whit Merrifield is targeted at his ADP in roto leagues mainly for his wheels. Speed isn’t nearly as crucial in a points format, so it’ll be difficult for him to return value as a top-five second baseman, especially on a lackluster Royals offense. Let somebody else reach up for his services.

Tier Three

All of these batters in this tier are sturdy options for your squad, and most of them carry dual position eligibility which is a bonus. Ozzie Albies and Gleyber Torres are the two sexy names that will likely go off the board the quickest. With this in mind, you can wait a round or two and get a similar option at a lower cost.

Daniel Murphy and Robinson Cano are both looking to bounce back on new squads after disappointing years. Murphy has mouth-watering potential playing half of his games at Coors Field in that dangerous lineup. It also appears that he’s fully recovered from the knee injury that held him out of nearly half the 2018 season, so you can draft with confidence.

Cano has remained one of the most consistent players in all of baseball for the last decade. His 80-game PED suspension has put a sour taste in a lot of fantasy player’s mouths, but he’s a sturdy option to play all season and fill up the stat sheet across the board. Volume is an important aspect to factor in, and Cano has proved it longer than anyone else at the position.

 

Rankings Analysis - Middle Tiers

Tier Four

The fourth tier is overflowing with prized basepath burners. Adalberto Mondesi, Jonathan Villar, and Dee Gordon don’t carry the fantasy appeal in a points league like they do in a roto league where owners desire their speed at a high price. Not to mention they all possess poor K-BB% numbers which further pushes down their stock. These jackrabbits are appropriately ranked here, and if they're available at this price, they’re still worth grabbing as their base hits and runs are expected to pile up.

Rougned Odor is an interesting post-hype sleeper at his cost. He had a very productive season in 2016-17 and improved his plate discipline numbers in 2018. If he can find the happy medium between these years, Odor might end up as a sneaky value play.

Travis Shaw stands out in this tier as the only true slugger of the bunch. He’s now hit 30 homers in back-to-back years, and he held a very respectable 5.1% K-BB% a year ago. Shaw’s points will come in bunches more often compared to the speedsters in this group, so it’s a personal preference on how you wish to attack this tier.

Tier Five

Max Muncy came out of nowhere in 2018 to hit 35 bombs in 137 games with the Dodgers. Dave Roberts has been known to shuffle up his lineup routinely, so Muncy isn’t a lock to remain hitting in the top-third for LA like he did last season. He’s likely to see some regression in his 29.4% HR/FB from 2018 and is better left to be drafted by someone else to take on the risk.

Cesar Hernandez and Jurickson Profar are looking to build on productive 2018 seasons. Hernandez will likely bat eighth for the Phillies this season, so it will be difficult for him to reach his 19/15 benchmarks from a year ago. Profar shifts to an Oakland Athletics team that finished third in the majors a season ago in runs. It’s one of the hardest stadiums to hit home runs in though, but he’ll bat in the middle of the lineup and should generate plenty of points regardless.

Yoan Moncada carries the most upside of this group. He also bears the most risk, but he could be a potential league winner at his mid-round cost. Moncada carries an extremely high career K-rate (33.6%), but if he can cut this number down below 30% and add a bit more power with his experience, he can put up a Javier Baez-like season.

 

Rankings Analysis - Lower Tiers

Tier Six

Second base begins to thin out at this tier as it groups up-and-comers with some savvy veterans. Garrett Hampson and Nick Senzel are generating plenty of preseason hype, but their roles are undetermined.

Hampson is a speedster as he stole 36 bags in 2018 and 51 in 2017 during his tenure in the minors. He doesn’t offer much power, but Coors Field could push his home run total to double digits.

Senzel provides both power and speed and will play in a plus ballpark in Cincinnati which pushes his ceiling to a 25/25 player over a full season's worth of games. Neither of these bats is locked into positions entering the season, but they could provide tremendous value once they carve out an everyday role.

Chris Taylor had a down 2018 after breaking out in 2017. His K-rate spiked over 4% to an underwhelming 29.5% mark last year, and his 17/85/63/9 line plunged below his 21/85/72/17 line from 2017 despite 15 more games played. Taylor will stay closer to last season’s roto totals, but at his price, he still carries a safer floor than most of the other players in this tier.

Tiers Seven And Eight

Rounding out the remaining players in the second base pool, Adam Frazier stands out as a high-upside play. He’ll bat leadoff for the Pirates with Josh Harrison out of town and holds a strong 6.1% K-BB% for his career. Frazier has mid-teens power with some speed but could push close to 90 runs in that leadoff spot.

Wilmer Flores could also raise a few eyebrows in 2019. Now that he’ll play nearly every day with the Diamondbacks, he is a late round breakout candidate. He possesses the ability to push over the 20 HR threshold while contributing with plenty of RBIs batting in the middle of the lineup. Flores also made great strides in plate discipline in 2018 with a 3.0% K-BB% after he held a 10.2% mark in 2017.

The Tampa Bay Rays inked Brandon Lowe to a six-year pact which says a lot coming from a thrifty team that rarely gives out long term deals. He’s tearing the cover off the ball this spring and could be a sneaky pick in the last couple rounds of your draft. Lowe has 20 HR potential and could wind up batting in the top third of the Rays lineup if he keeps up his minor league career .374 OBP.

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H2H Points Leagues First Basemen - Overvalued & Undervalued

For those fantasy enthusiasts that love the head-to-head competition and being able to trash talk their friends every week, the points league is the ideal setup. For the casual player in this format, it’s common to unknowingly draft using a standard top-300 list from a magazine or website. These lists base themselves on roto formats, and depending on which league you are participating in, there is a contradiction in value.

For batters, the roto leagues value hitters more for their stolen base ability, while they generally disregard some aspects of plate discipline. Strikeouts and walks are crucial to recognize in a points league because they will count as a point for, or against your team. In a roto format, it’s irrelevant if a batter strikes out 200 times, as long as they attain their 40 homers.

There is a significant difference between these leagues, and today we’ll go through some first basemen who carry a very different value in a points format.

 

Overvalued First Basemen - H2H Points Leagues

Paul Goldschmidt (STL) - 19 ADP

Now a member of the St. Louis Cardinals, Paul Goldschmidt remains a safe option at the other hot corner, but he may not be worth the fee of the first one-bagger off the board in points leagues. Goldschmidt’s walk rate has hit a new low in each of the last four seasons as it finished at a 13.0% BB% in 2018. A respectable number, but his K-rate has trended the opposite way that we want to see. His 25.1% K% helped him reach a 12.1% K-BB% in 2018, the worst number that he has encountered since his debut 48 game sample in 2011. Entering his age-31 season, Goldschmidt will return excellent numbers in 5x5 roto scoring that still translates well to a points format. Caution should be warranted, however, that there may be better options at his position in this specific format, especially given his declining plate discipline numbers.

Edwin Encarnacion (SEA) - 129 ADP

For the fifth-consecutive season, Edwin Encarnacion's K-rate rose as it sat at a 22.8% K% a year ago. Not only did his strikeout rate soar, but his walk rate seen it's lowest number since 2011 as it plummeted to a 10.9% BB%. His power has deteriorated as well with a seven-year low in HR (32), and he may not return the counting stats that he had as a member of prolific Blue Jays and Indians teams. At age 36, Encarnacion has more considerable health risks than ever before, and playing time may also be a concern in 2019. The Mariners have a plethora of 1B/DH players on their roster, so if any minor issue comes up, he’ll be sure to sit out a few games. Volume is a key in points leagues, and Encarnacion will lack it in 2019.

Luke Voit (NYY) - 179 ADP

Many people fell in love with Luke Voit’s power surge in the final months of the 2018 season. Now that he’s ready to embark on a full season in the hitter-friendly AL East, his power potential screams breakout. An aspect overlooked in Voit’s game is his high strikeout total. He held an uninspiring 26.7% K% due to his 15.2% SwStr% that would have finished in the leagues bottom-10 among qualified bats. The Yankees also have a wealth of infield options, and he may be platooning more often than expected with Greg Bird still in town and Miguel Andujar profiling better on that side of the diamond defensively. Voit may not accumulate enough at-bats to fulfill his ADP in points leagues, especially if his K-rate continues on his 2018 course.

 

Undervalued First Basemen - H2H Points Leagues

Joey Votto (CIN) - 67 ADP

After a down year in 2018, Joey Votto’s price has dropped significantly making him a perfect target for points leagues. Votto may have the best eye in all of baseball as he has now walked more times than he’s struck out in three of the last four seasons. His 17.3% walk rate finished third-best in the majors last year as his K-rate came in at a well above-average 16.2% mark a season ago. It’s a distinct advantage for Votto over all the other first baseman when he has no negative points working against him. He's primed for some positive regression in his baffling 9.5% HR/FB from last year, and a boost in RBI and run numbers with an improved lineup around him. Votto can easily finish as a top-three first baseman in points leagues, and could even push for that number one seed with a recovery in his home run bat.

Carlos Santana (CLE) - 197 ADP

In his only season away from the Cleveland Indians, it appeared Carlos Santana had a sub-par season. This perception was far from the truth as the switch-hitter played in 161 games racking up 168 R+RBI in his year with the Phillies. He’s now played in 152 games or more in six-straight years proving to be one of the most durable position players in baseball. This fact is crucial in points leagues as we want our players out there virtually every day accumulating points. Santana also led all first baseman in 2018 with a -2.5% K-BB%, further entrenching him as a sleeper in this format. Santana only carries a .247 career batting average which doesn’t play that well in roto leagues, but this stat inserts Santana much lower in general rankings and is worth grabbing at least a round or two above his ADP in a points setup.

Josh Bell (PIT) - 255 ADP

Josh Bell was a boring player in roto leagues last season. He failed to make a significant impact in any roto category, but there’s much more value in his skill set in a points league. Bell finished his sophomore season as the fourth-best first baseman in K-BB% with a 4.6% mark. An outstanding figure for a 26-year-old, with some more big league seasoning this rate is sure to improve. Bell, like Votto, suffered a power outage as well in 2018 as he could only muster 12 big flys compared to 26 in his rookie campaign. His HR/FB fell nearly 10% to 9.2%, and it’s sure to see some positive regression to get him back up to the 20 homer range in 2019. Far from a sexy pick in roto leagues, Bell is very serviceable in your corner infield spot in a points league.

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H2H Points Leagues Outfielders - Overvalued & Undervalued

For those fantasy enthusiasts that love the head-to-head competition and being able to trash talk their friends every week, the points league is the ideal setup. For the casual player in this format, it’s common to unknowingly draft using a standard top-300 list from a magazine or website. These lists base themselves on roto formats, and depending on which league you are participating in, there is a contradiction in value.

For batters, the roto leagues value hitters more for their stolen base ability, while they generally disregard some aspects of plate discipline. Strikeouts and walks are crucial to recognize in a points league because they will count as a point for, or against your team. In a roto format, it’s irrelevant if a batter strikes out 200 times, as long as they attain their 40 homers.

There is a significant difference between these leagues, and today we’ll go through some outfielders who carry a very different value in a points format.

 

Overvalued Outfielders - H2H Points Leagues

Giancarlo Stanton (NYY) - 22 ADP

There’s no question Giancarlo Stanton’s power is worth salivating over. What we need to be aware of in points leagues is how much his home run and RBI numbers get downgraded because he strikes out so often. Stanton struck out 211 times in 2018, bad enough for a 29.9% K%, just slightly higher than his career average. He also showed his worst patience since 2012 with a 9.9% BB%, so if we subtract his free-passes from his punch outs, Stanton would have -141 points in this area. This number, in effect, cancels out his entire RBI production as well as about 25% of his HR total. Stanton is a top-10 outfield pick in a roto league typically, but this data doesn’t merit a top-10 selection in the outfield for a points system.

Starling Marte (PIT) - 38 ADP

What gives Starling Marte tremendous fantasy appeal is his power/speed combination. 20/30 players are hard to come by, but in a points format, his year-end number of points is easily attainable elsewhere. If your scoring settings reward a point for a steal, Marte can be treated as a bat with 28 HR without the extra RBI that come with it. Marte had a respectable 18.0% K% in 2018, but compared to his 5.8% BB%, it’s anything but desirable. These numbers slapped his 0.32 BB/K among the outfield’s bottom-12, right below Stanton’s 0.33 mark from a year ago. Marte doesn’t possess the entire skill set that would reward a top-15 selection at his position in a points setup, and he needs a downgrade by at least a couple of rounds.

Harrison Bader (STL) - 181 ADP

Another outfielder admired for his power/speed potential is youngster Harrison Bader. The 24-year-old made an impact in 2018 with the Cardinals, knocking 12 out of the park while swiping 15 bags in just 427 plate appearances. Volume could be a factor for Bader in 2019, as the Cards have several outfield options to fill in for him if he were to struggle at any point during the year. Bader also doesn’t profile as anything larger than a 20-HR bat, and to be seriously considered in a points league, he needs to make strides in plate discipline. Bader held a worrisome 29.3% K% as a rookie, which would have placed his 0.25 BB/K tied for fourth-worst in the majors among outfielders. Bader will also bat at the bottom of the St. Louis lineup, so the counting stats won’t provide enough point value to return his ADP cost.

 

Undervalued Outfielders - H2H Points Leagues

Michael Brantley (HOU) - 117 ADP

Michael Brantley may not move the needle enough in the HR or SB category in a roto format, but in a points league, his consistency and batted-ball skills play perfectly. Brantley’s 0.80 BB/K ranked sixth-best among outfielders a season ago, essentially letting him count all of his stats towards his year-end total. Brantley’s 17 HR from a season ago isn’t necessarily enticing, but his 36 doubles were admirable in his final season as a Cleveland Indian. Now a member of the Houston Astros, Brantley has even more of an opportunity to accumulate plenty of R and RBI numbers, batting in their potent lineup. Turning 32 in May, there’s plenty left in the tank for the left-handed bat as his contact and hard-hit ability have only increased with age.

Jesse Winker (CIN) - 197 ADP

If you were to draw a younger comparison to Brantley, it would surely have to be Jesse Winker. Also a left-handed swinger, Winker duplicates Brantley’s elite plate discipline numbers by selling out for contact instead of clobbering fence-clearing shots. His ceiling as a home run hitter is a number in the mid-teens, but his proficiency to get on-base considerably outweighs this in a points league. Winker was one of only a handful of players in 2018 to walk more than he struck out, and the only outfielder to perform such a feat. Winker is slated to bat at the top of a stacked Reds lineup in 2019, optimizing his points total. There is a slight playing time concern, but with Nick Senzel’s status in the air, and the aging Matt Kemp a liability in left field, Winker will earn the playing time he deserves.

Nick Markakis (ATL) - 328 ADP

A late-round gold mine for your points league comes by the bat of veteran Nick Markakis. He carries the same qualities as Brantley and Winker, dominating the BB/K category with limited power. Markakis swatted just 14 big flys in 2018, but his 0.90 BB/K ranked third-best among qualified outfielders. The journeyman managed to provide a silver lining for his lack of power by piling up 43 doubles, also third-best among outfielders. Markakis returns to an even more formidable lineup in Atlanta compared to what he was in a year ago. Slated to bat fifth for the Braves, Markakis is a points league steal at his ADP, and he’s certain to accumulate at least another 160 R+RBI in 2019.

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Top 690: Updated H2H Points League Rankings

Welcome back RotoBallers. Spring training is in full swing, and we couldn't be more excited for fantasy baseball drafts and the approaching MLB season. Below you will find our staff's updated fantasy baseball points league rankings (top 690) for head-to-head points formats. Be sure to also check out our fantasy baseball rankings dashboard and bookmark that page. It's loaded up with tons more great rankings including:

  • Mixed league rankings
  • AL/NL only league rankings
  • Dynasty prospect rankings
  • Redraft rookie rankings for 2019
  • Dynasty/keeper rankings

Three of our lead fantasy baseball analysts - Nick Mariano, JB Branson and Bill Dubiel - have analyzed the current landscape and are ready to help you win. Below you will find their consensus staff ranks for 2019, which will be updated regularly up until opening day on our main Rankings Wizard. Feel free to click those links and give these fine gents a follow, or let them know if you love or hate their rankings.

Aside from going 690 players deep with our rankings, and including both tiers and auction values, we have some extra goodies for all you RotoBallers. In case you missed it, our very own "Big Pick Nick" Mariano was recently named the #1 overall most accurate industry expert ranker for the 2018 season. You can see his secret sauce below! Additionally, industry legend Scott Engel recently joined the RotoBaller team and provides his insights as well. Scott is a FSWA Hall Of Famer and multiple-time writing-award winner.

 

Top 690 Rankings: H2H Points Leagues (March)

These staff rankings are as of March 16th, 2019. They are for head-to-head points leagues, and will be updated regularly through Opening Day.

Typically, points leagues have different league settings and scoring formats than most. Different stats and categories are assigned different point values, and that can vary by individual league settings. These different point buckets are then added up over the course of a scoring period or season.

In many cases, hitters who walk more and strikeout less are preferred for points leagues. Also, many league formats tend to give more weight to pitchers than normal as they can easily accrue points through categories like Innings Pitched. These are the general frameworks that we use for our ranks below.

You can also read more about typical points league scoring settings and draft strategies.

Ranks Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill Auction $
1 1 Mike Trout OF 1 1 1 48
2 1 Mookie Betts OF 2 3 2 45
3 1 Max Scherzer SP 3 2 4 44
4 1 Jose Ramirez 2B/3B 4 4 3 44
5 1 Jacob deGrom SP 5 6 6 41
6 1 Chris Sale SP 6 5 9 40
7 1 Nolan Arenado 3B 7 8 8 39
8 1 J.D. Martinez OF 11 7 5 39
9 2 Justin Verlander SP 8 9 14 37
10 2 Alex Bregman 3B/SS 15 11 7 37
11 2 Corey Kluber SP 17 12 10 36
12 2 Christian Yelich OF 12 13 15 35
13 2 Bryce Harper OF 9 14 20 34
14 2 Francisco Lindor SS 14 20 13 34
15 2 Ronald Acuna OF 16 16 17 34
16 2 Gerrit Cole SP 13 17 22 34
17 2 Aaron Nola SP 25 10 19 34
18 2 Manny Machado 3B/SS 18 19 18 33
19 2 Trevor Bauer SP 10 15 33 33
20 2 Jose Altuve 2B 28 22 11 32
21 2 Paul Goldschmidt 1B 24 23 16 32
22 2 Blake Snell SP 23 18 24 31
23 3 Aaron Judge OF 27 29 12 30
24 3 Carlos Carrasco SP 20 21 27 30
25 3 Freddie Freeman 1B 26 24 21 30
26 3 Trea Turner SS 19 27 28 30
27 3 Trevor Story SS 22 31 30 29
28 3 Anthony Rizzo 1B 35 26 26 29
29 3 Charlie Blackmon OF 30 34 29 29
30 3 Noah Syndergaard SP 21 32 43 28
31 3 Joey Votto 1B 40 33 23 28
32 3 Andrew Benintendi OF 34 36 31 28
33 3 Giancarlo Stanton OF 29 38 36 28
34 3 Kris Bryant 3B/OF 32 39 32 27
35 3 Walker Buehler SP 33 28 42 27
36 3 Juan Soto OF 36 30 40 26
37 3 Anthony Rendon 3B 38 35 35 25
38 4 Patrick Corbin SP 42 25 44 24
39 4 James Paxton SP 41 41 37 24
40 4 Rhys Hoskins 1B/OF 39 43 39 24
41 4 George Springer OF 48 46 34 24
42 4 Stephen Strasburg SP 46 45 45 23
43 4 Starling Marte OF 37 53 51 23
44 4 Zack Greinke SP 45 50 46 23
45 4 Cody Bellinger 1B/OF 47 48 47 22
46 4 Luis Severino SP 44 37 61 21
47 4 Javier Baez 2B/SS/3B 53 40 49 21
48 4 Khris Davis OF 31 58 54 20
49 4 Whit Merrifield 2B/OF 49 44 52 20
50 4 Edwin Diaz RP 60 47 41 20
51 4 Xander Bogaerts SS 54 49 48 20
52 4 Matt Carpenter 1B/2B/3B 73 42 38 19
53 4 Eugenio Suarez 3B 43 52 60 19
54 5 Carlos Correa SS 50 51 55 19
55 5 Jameson Taillon SP 52 57 57 18
56 5 Clayton Kershaw SP 79 67 25 19
57 5 German Marquez SP 58 64 50 19
58 5 Mike Clevinger SP 51 55 68 19
59 5 David Price SP 64 56 56 19
60 5 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 3B 55 59 65 19
61 5 Jack Flaherty SP 65 63 53 19
62 5 Blake Treinen RP 68 54 62 18
63 5 Zack Wheeler SP 57 60 69 18
64 5 Justin Turner 3B 72 62 59 18
65 5 Jean Segura SS 63 61 73 18
66 5 Lorenzo Cain OF 71 65 64 18
67 6 Jose Berrios SP 74 70 58 18
68 6 Eddie Rosario OF 61 75 78 17
69 6 Nelson Cruz DH 69 69 77 17
70 6 Miles Mikolas SP 66 72 80 17
71 6 Daniel Murphy 1B/2B 77 71 72 17
72 6 Michael Brantley OF 87 66 71 17
73 6 Josh Donaldson 3B 75 76 75 17
74 6 Corey Seager SS 86 68 74 17
75 6 Scooter Gennett 2B 92 74 63 17
76 6 Mitch Haniger OF 62 78 91 17
77 6 Kenley Jansen RP 89 77 70 17
78 6 Ozzie Albies 2B 81 80 81 17
79 6 Tommy Pham OF 80 73 96 17
80 7 Aaron Hicks OF 76 86 87 17
81 7 Jose Abreu 1B 70 85 98 16
82 7 Nicholas Castellanos OF 85 81 89 16
83 7 Justin Upton OF 67 97 94 16
84 7 Robinson Cano 1B/2B 97 83 82 16
85 7 Yasiel Puig OF 56 87 119 16
86 7 Craig Kimbrel RP 107 95 66 16
87 7 A.J. Pollock OF 96 101 76 16
88 7 Edwin Encarnacion 1B 94 114 67 16
89 7 Aroldis Chapman RP 103 84 88 16
90 7 Miguel Andujar 3B 98 92 86 16
91 7 Jesus Aguilar 1B 100 90 90 16
92 7 Gleyber Torres 2B/SS 82 98 102 16
93 7 Marcell Ozuna OF 83 93 108 15
94 7 Carlos Santana 1B/3B 88 94 105 16
95 7 Masahiro Tanaka SP 84 107 100 15
96 7 J.A. Happ SP 91 103 99 15
97 7 Kyle Hendricks SP 78 113 103 15
98 8 J.T. Realmuto C/1B 93 88 114 15
99 8 Brad Hand RP 114 100 85 14
100 8 Mike Foltynewicz SP 118 99 83 14
101 8 Charlie Morton SP 127 82 92 14
102 8 Jose Peraza 2B/SS 112 96 93 14
103 8 Travis Shaw 1B/2B/3B 117 91 97 14
104 8 David Peralta OF 110 119 84 14
105 8 Matt Olson 1B 102 109 111 13
106 8 Andrew McCutchen OF 115 104 107 13
107 8 Felipe Vazquez RP 116 110 101 13
108 8 Adalberto Mondesi 2B/SS 59 79 194 13
109 8 Gary Sanchez C 99 112 122 12
110 8 Roberto Osuna RP 95 105 135 12
111 8 Madison Bumgarner SP 143 89 104 12
112 9 David Dahl OF 111 106 123 12
113 9 Brian Dozier 2B 121 115 110 12
114 9 Mike Moustakas 3B 104 124 124 11
115 9 Michael Conforto OF 106 117 130 11
116 9 Chris Archer SP 135 102 116 11
117 9 Sean Doolittle RP 101 132 126 11
118 9 Wil Myers 3B/OF 108 116 142 11
119 9 Joey Gallo 3B/1B/OF 90 122 158 11
120 9 Jonathan Villar 2B/SS 105 108 160 11
121 9 Ender Inciarte OF 146 123 106 11
122 9 Matt Chapman 3B 109 131 136 11
123 9 Kirby Yates RP 129 120 128 11
124 9 Luis Castillo SP 125 133 129 10
125 9 Josh Hader RP 138 137 117 10
126 9 Kyle Freeland SP 148 129 115 10
127 9 Yu Darvish SP 113 134 148 10
128 9 Corey Knebel RP 130 125 146 10
129 9 Brandon Nimmo OF 172 152 79 10
130 9 Dee Gordon 2B/OF 126 126 154 10
131 9 Nick Pivetta SP 134 145 133 9
132 9 Jose Leclerc RP 131 118 167 9
133 9 Rick Porcello SP 122 159 138 9
134 10 Victor Robles OF 128 136 156 9
135 10 Rougned Odor 2B 123 138 159 9
136 10 Max Muncy 1B/2B/3B 162 111 150 9
137 10 Elvis Andrus SS 155 139 134 9
138 10 Jesse Winker OF 160 155 113 9
139 10 Eloy Jimenez OF 137 146 151 9
140 10 Miguel Cabrera 1B 120 160 155 9
141 10 Ryan Braun 1B/OF 141 165 131 9
142 10 Rich Hill SP 124 151 165 9
143 10 Cole Hamels SP 142 156 144 9
144 10 Eric Hosmer 1B 161 135 147 9
145 10 Ian Desmond OF/1B 152 149 143 9
146 10 Shohei Ohtani DH 216 121 109 9
147 10 Robbie Ray SP 133 150 164 9
148 10 Eduardo Rodriguez SP 140 127 181 9
149 10 Raisel Iglesias RP 169 141 139 9
150 10 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 196 130 125 8
151 10 Wade Davis RP 147 148 157 8
152 10 Nathan Eovaldi SP 132 144 177 8
153 11 Mallex Smith OF 144 142 168 8
154 11 Jon Gray SP 179 158 118 8
155 11 Andrelton Simmons SS 176 161 121 8
156 11 Cesar Hernandez 2B 174 147 141 8
157 11 Tim Anderson SS 150 140 175 8
158 11 Wilson Ramos C 139 163 176 8
159 11 Andrew Heaney SP 170 128 183 8
160 11 Kyle Schwarber OF 185 166 137 8
161 11 Dallas Keuchel SP 187 157 145 8
162 11 Harrison Bader OF 183 179 127 7
163 11 Hyun-Jin Ryu SP 145 186 #N/A 7
164 11 Stephen Piscotty OF 173 164 161 7
165 11 Shane Bieber SP 158 154 186 7
166 11 Nick Markakis OF 153 238 112 7
167 11 Rafael Devers 3B 151 176 180 7
168 11 Collin McHugh SP 119 211 178 7
169 11 Ken Giles RP 163 143 221 7
170 11 Yadier Molina C 182 175 170 7
171 11 Alex Reyes SP/RP 240 196 95 7
172 11 Carlos Martinez SP 211 173 153 7
173 11 Buster Posey C/1B 232 162 152 6
174 11 Yoan Moncada 2B 171 170 206 6
175 11 Luke Voit 1B 184 189 174 6
176 11 Jose Quintana SP 177 174 197 6
177 11 Jonathan Schoop 2B 197 181 171 6
178 11 David Robertson RP 200 169 184 6
179 11 Justin Smoak 1B 157 228 169 6
180 11 Amed Rosario SS 188 184 189 6
181 11 Kenta Maeda SP 156 188 217 6
182 11 Ross Stripling SP 136 185 240 6
183 11 Nomar Mazara OF 175 183 210 6
184 11 Yasmani Grandal C 204 182 185 6
185 11 Jake Arrieta SP 164 202 209 5
186 11 Jon Lester SP 180 201 198 5
187 11 Tyler Glasnow SP 190 153 239 5
188 11 Garrett Hampson 2B 213 178 192 5
189 11 Willson Contreras C 205 180 200 5
190 12 Adam Eaton OF 159 167 260 5
191 12 Sean Newcomb SP 220 172 196 5
192 12 Shin-Soo Choo OF 168 258 162 5
193 12 Marcus Semien SS 224 198 173 5
194 12 Paul DeJong SS 181 207 212 5
195 12 Yuli Gurriel 1B/2B/3B 214 214 172 5
196 12 Jose Martinez OF/1B 271 192 140 5
197 12 Corey Dickerson OF 192 206 207 5
198 12 Will Smith RP 268 171 166 5
199 12 Marco Gonzales SP 189 229 195 5
200 12 Tyler Skaggs SP 166 203 245 4
201 12 Austin Meadows OF 186 195 234 4
202 12 Alex Wood SP 212 204 202 4
203 12 Jose Alvarado RP 210 177 231 4
204 12 Eduardo Escobar SS/3B 231 191 199 4
205 12 Cody Allen RP 167 205 251 4
206 12 Andrew Miller RP 233 231 163 4
207 12 Zack Godley SP 221 221 188 4
208 12 Tyler White 1B 165 236 229 4
209 12 Alex Colome RP 225 219 187 4
210 12 Yusei Kikuchi SP 154 190 289 4
211 12 DJ LeMahieu 2B 272 239 132 4
212 12 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 249 187 208 4
213 12 Odubel Herrera OF 243 220 182 4
214 12 Anibal Sanchez SP 149 232 269 4
215 13 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 244 212 201 4
216 13 Trey Mancini 1B/OF 198 230 230 4
217 13 Ketel Marte SS 239 197 222 3
218 13 Seranthony Dominguez RP 309 208 149 3
219 13 Gregory Polanco OF 267 280 120 3
220 13 Domingo Santana OF 199 227 244 3
221 13 Hunter Renfroe OF 238 218 219 3
222 13 Joe Musgrove SP 195 222 259 3
223 13 Max Kepler OF 206 217 255 3
224 13 Mychal Givens RP 252 199 228 3
225 13 Kyle Gibson SP 250 237 193 3
226 13 Kevin Gausman SP 218 215 248 3
227 13 Franmil Reyes OF 222 213 249 3
228 13 Archie Bradley RP 234 210 243 3
229 13 Ramon Laureano OF 217 224 246 3
230 13 Jorge Polanco SS 178 242 268 3
231 13 Trevor May RP 209 252 #N/A 3
232 13 Jackie Bradley Jr. OF 228 200 265 3
233 13 Dereck Rodriguez SP 230 250 215 3
234 13 Dellin Betances RP 203 294 203 3
235 13 Joey Lucchesi SP 208 209 285 3
236 13 Nick Senzel 2B/3B/OF 253 216 #N/A 3
237 13 Josh Bell 1B 215 247 242 3
238 13 Byron Buxton OF 227 168 310 3
239 13 Mike Minor SP 226 257 223 3
240 13 Jordan Hicks RP 219 240 247 3
241 13 C.J. Cron 1B 259 233 220 2
242 14 Michael Fulmer SP 194 286 233 2
243 14 Josh James SP 296 194 226 2
244 14 Steven Matz SP 242 225 252 2
245 14 Billy Hamilton OF 290 193 241 2
246 14 Arodys Vizcaino RP 248 223 256 2
247 14 Asdrubal Cabrera SS/2B/3B 207 281 #N/A 2
248 14 Ryan Zimmerman 1B 201 297 238 2
249 14 Ian Happ 3B/OF 269 244 224 2
250 14 Jhoulys Chacin SP 202 261 277 2
251 14 Carlos Rodon SP 251 254 254 2
252 14 Maikel Franco 3B 265 306 190 2
253 14 Manuel Margot OF 247 246 271 2
254 14 Jimmy Nelson SP 193 251 321 2
255 14 Randal Grichuk OF 256 273 237 2
256 14 Matthew Boyd SP 229 276 263 2
257 14 Trevor Williams SP 257 262 250 2
258 14 Brandon Belt 1B/OF 236 322 218 2
259 14 Jake Lamb 3B 237 264 283 2
260 14 Jeff McNeil 2B 313 265 214 2
261 14 Reynaldo Lopez SP 241 259 293 2
262 14 Jake Bauers 1B/OF 261 255 279 2
263 14 Jesus Luzardo SP 223 243 331 2
264 14 Steven Souza Jr. OF 266 278 253 2
265 14 Brett Gardner OF 283 310 204 2
266 14 Jed Lowrie 2B 361 234 205 2
267 14 Matt Kemp OF 284 287 232 1
268 14 Julio Urias SP 270 226 308 1
269 14 Brad Peacock RP/SP 235 303 #N/A 1
270 14 Pete Alonso 1B 331 241 236 1
271 14 Miguel Sano 1B/3B 347 288 179 1
272 15 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 245 256 316 1
273 15 Marcus Stroman SP 297 249 276 1
274 15 Brian Anderson 3B/OF 273 277 272 1
275 15 Teoscar Hernandez OF 306 301 216 1
276 15 Lourdes Gurriel Jr. 2B/SS 305 245 #N/A 1
277 15 Mike Soroka SP 275 269 281 1
278 15 Dylan Bundy SP 254 274 302 1
279 15 Julio Teheran SP 295 268 267 1
280 15 Kevin Kiermaier OF 246 290 298 1
281 15 Danny Jansen C 263 248 326 1
282 15 Kyle Seager 3B 345 283 211 1
283 15 Derek Holland SP 255 330 261 1
284 15 Welington Castillo C 274 293 #N/A 1
285 15 Shane Greene RP 304 253 296 1
286 15 Cedric Mullins OF 278 284 292 1
287 15 Sonny Gray SP 298 275 #N/A 1
288 15 Kevin Pillar OF 258 298 309 1
289 15 Chase Anderson SP 280 313 274 1
290 15 Brandon Morrow RP 383 295 191 1
291 15 Wilmer Flores 1B/3B/2B 191 396 #N/A 1
292 16 Jake Junis SP 327 289 266 1
293 16 Mike Fiers SP 281 296 306 1
294 16 Aaron Sanchez SP 293 299 #N/A 1
295 16 Adam Jones OF 376 291 225 1
296 16 Drew Steckenrider RP 373 292 227 1
297 16 Luke Weaver SP 264 333 #N/A 1
298 16 Trevor Cahill SP 294 331 278 1
299 16 Pedro Strop RP 333 270 #N/A 1
300 16 Forrest Whitley SP 289 263 358 1
301 16 Kyle Tucker OF 422 235 257 1
302 16 A.J. Minter RP 346 304 264 1
303 16 Starlin Castro 2B 301 328 287 1
304 16 Vince Velasquez SP 291 318 312 1
305 16 Justin Bour 1B 285 347 290 1
306 16 Tucker Barnhart C/1B 308 307 #N/A 1
307 16 Freddy Peralta SP 277 320 329 1
308 16 Matt Strahm RP/SP 276 340 311 1
309 16 Willy Adames SS 336 266 332 1
310 16 Trevor Richards SP 316 317 304 1
311 16 Ian Kinsler 2B 288 353 299 1
312 16 Tyler O'Neill OF #N/A 314 #N/A 1
313 16 Francisco Cervelli C 307 312 324 1
314 16 Brandon Woodruff SP 303 326 #N/A 1
315 16 Kole Calhoun OF 310 375 262 1
316 16 CC Sabathia SP 315 366 273 1
317 16 Jose Urena SP 279 358 #N/A 1
318 16 Daniel Palka OF 338 324 294 1
319 16 Michael Wacha SP 317 271 370 1
320 17 Adam Ottavino RP 350 339 280 1
321 17 Christin Stewart OF 260 389 #N/A 1
322 17 Jeimer Candelario 3B 334 351 291 1
323 17 Yan Gomes C 366 285 #N/A 1
324 17 Michael Pineda SP 323 329 #N/A 1
325 17 Danny Duffy SP 292 334 353 1
326 17 Evan Longoria 3B 340 316 #N/A 1
327 17 Martin Perez SP 328 #N/A #N/A 1
328 17 Luis Urias 2B 399 354 235 1
329 17 Jason Kipnis 2B/OF 380 323 286 1
330 17 Mike Zunino C 360 300 #N/A 1
331 17 Johan Camargo 2B/3B/SS 400 332 258 1
332 17 Corbin Burnes SP/RP 353 302 341 1
333 17 Jeremy Jeffress RP 407 315 275 1
334 17 Caleb Smith SP 287 369 343 1
335 17 Tanner Roark SP 359 359 282 1
336 17 Jorge Alfaro C 362 305 335 1
337 17 Ryan O'Hearn 1B 348 344 314 1
338 17 Sandy Alcantara SP 302 378 327 1
339 17 Yonder Alonso 1B 448 267 295 1
340 17 Chris Paddack SP 322 352 #N/A 1
341 17 Brad Boxberger RP 300 376 #N/A 1
342 17 Matt Barnes RP 312 365 #N/A 1
343 17 Ehire Adrianza SS/1B/3B #N/A #N/A 342 1
344 17 Francisco Mejia C 419 279 330 1
345 17 Zach Eflin SP 343 308 378 1
346 17 Didi Gregorius SS 381 337 313 1
347 17 Tyler Anderson SP 314 399 318 1
348 17 Jeff Samardzija SP 299 367 366 1
349 17 Jay Bruce OF/1B 415 282 #N/A 1
350 17 Josh Reddick OF 365 384 301 1
351 17 Brad Keller SP 330 368 356 1
352 17 Hunter Strickland RP 329 374 #N/A 1
353 17 Franchy Cordero OF 349 356 #N/A 1
354 17 Kendrys Morales 1B 262 502 297 1
355 17 Chad Green RP 363 360 339 1
356 17 Jake Odorizzi SP 379 327 357 1
357 17 Avisail Garcia OF 354 309 401 1
358 17 Matt Harvey SP 341 341 382 1
359 17 Lucas Giolito SP 311 412 345 1
360 17 Framber Valdez SP 286 426 #N/A 1
361 17 Scott Schebler OF 433 349 288 1
362 17 Lance Lynn SP 342 362 371 1
363 18 Seth Lugo SP/RP 357 418 305 1
364 18 Willie Calhoun OF 397 364 322 1
365 18 Touki Toussaint SP 388 335 #N/A 1
366 18 Pablo Lopez SP 332 402 351 1
367 18 Ryan Brasier RP 369 355 #N/A 1
368 18 Ryan Yarbrough SP 405 321 361 1
369 18 Clay Buchholz SP 339 395 355 1
370 18 Mark Trumbo OF 325 403 #N/A 1
371 18 Willians Astudillo C 485 272 337 1
372 18 Robbie Erlin SP 320 410 #N/A 1
373 18 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 370 380 346 1
374 18 Zack Britton RP 337 397 #N/A 1
375 18 Orlando Arcia SS 355 383 #N/A 1
376 18 Leonys Martin OF 344 394 #N/A 1
377 18 Merrill Kelly SP 321 417 #N/A 1
378 18 Justus Sheffield SP 358 381 #N/A 1
379 18 Wade Miley SP 351 391 #N/A 1
380 18 Anthony DeSclafani SP 377 345 393 1
381 18 Adam Frazier 2B 398 346 #N/A 1
382 18 Ryon Healy 1B 432 421 270 1
383 18 Jung Ho Kang 3B 282 444 398 1
384 18 Dinelson Lamet SP 431 #N/A 319 1
385 18 Jorge Soler OF 371 388 373 1
386 18 Felix Hernandez SP 404 379 349 1
387 18 Antonio Senzatela SP 378 #N/A #N/A 1
388 18 Joc Pederson OF 428 338 369 1
389 18 Brandon Crawford SS 356 416 364 1
390 18 Josh Harrison 2B 393 400 344 1
391 18 Robinson Chirinos C 440 319 #N/A 1
392 18 Isiah Kiner-Falefa C/2B/3B 475 342 323 1
393 18 Scott Kingery SS/3B/OF 394 392 359 1
394 18 Troy Tulowitzki SS 375 423 347 1
395 18 Jordan Montgomery SP 384 #N/A #N/A 1
396 18 Mike Leake SP 324 501 328 1
397 18 Jeurys Familia RP 430 404 325 1
398 18 Jason Vargas SP 368 405 #N/A 1
399 18 Ivan Nova SP 335 490 338 1
400 18 Nick Ahmed SS 424 437 303 1
401 18 Austin Hedges C 452 325 #N/A 1
402 18 Greg Allen OF 416 361 #N/A 1
403 18 Kike Hernandez 2B/SS/OF 435 343 #N/A 1
404 18 Kurt Suzuki C 402 377 #N/A 1
405 18 Joe Jimenez RP 387 398 #N/A 1
406 18 Lewis Brinson OF 389 425 365 1
407 18 Delino DeShields OF 438 348 #N/A 1
408 18 Adam Duvall 1B/OF 473 #N/A 317 1
409 18 Dan Straily SP 396 #N/A #N/A 1
410 19 Ronald Guzman 1B 367 427 #N/A 1
411 19 Taijuan Walker SP 441 #N/A 354 1
412 19 Dansby Swanson SS 401 430 362 1
413 19 Jeremy Hellickson SP 382 419 397 1
414 19 Austin Barnes C 490 373 352 1
415 19 Albert Pujols 1B 409 522 284 1
416 19 Eric Thames 1B/OF 436 409 372 1
417 19 Ryan McMahon 1B/3B/2B 411 401 #N/A 1
418 19 Albert Almora Jr. OF 437 #N/A 375 1
419 19 Mitch Moreland 1B 364 516 340 1
420 19 Carlos Gonzalez OF 464 450 307 1
421 19 Blake Parker RP 465 350 #N/A 1
422 19 Yandy Diaz 3B 390 459 374 1
423 19 Ty Buttrey RP 439 455 334 1
424 19 Brent Honeywell SP 470 439 320 1
425 19 Mark Melancon RP 392 428 #N/A 1
426 19 Jason Heyward OF 385 470 376 1
427 19 Matt Shoemaker SP 406 420 #N/A 1
428 19 Joe Kelly RP 444 #N/A 385 1
429 19 Alex Cobb SP 386 446 #N/A 1
430 19 Eduardo Nunez 2B/3B 477 406 368 1
431 19 Marco Estrada SP 318 519 #N/A 1
432 19 Omar Narvaez C 468 372 #N/A 1
433 19 Ben Zobrist 2B/OF 471 370 #N/A 1
434 19 Addison Russell SS 421 #N/A #N/A 1
435 19 Domingo German SP 412 431 #N/A 1
436 19 Wade LeBlanc SP 374 506 388 1
437 19 Jake Cave OF 417 539 315 1
438 19 John Hicks C/1B 466 382 #N/A 1
439 19 Franklin Barreto SS 429 482 363 1
440 19 Raimel Tapia OF 395 520 360 1
441 19 Yolmer Sanchez 2B/3B 497 478 300 1
442 19 Kelvin Herrera RP 488 363 #N/A 1
443 19 Steven Duggar OF 410 443 #N/A 1
444 19 Pablo Reyes OF 427 #N/A #N/A 1
445 19 Brendan Rodgers SS 481 415 395 1
446 19 Gio Gonzalez SP 541 371 380 1
447 19 Nick Kingham SP 403 504 386 1
448 19 Ryan Pressly RP 414 448 #N/A 1
449 19 Alex Verdugo OF 525 386 384 1
450 19 Colin Moran 3B/1B 459 445 394 1
451 19 Bradley Zimmer OF 425 553 336 1
452 19 Kyle Wright SP 423 453 #N/A 1
453 19 Wei-Yin Chen SP 319 557 #N/A 1
454 19 J.P. Crawford SS 372 505 #N/A 1
455 19 Trevor Rosenthal RP 449 429 #N/A 1
456 19 Aledmys Diaz SS #N/A 442 #N/A 1
457 19 Joe Ross SP 504 434 390 1
458 19 Wily Peralta SP/RP 537 408 383 1
459 19 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 455 523 350 1
460 20 Mac Williamson OF 443 #N/A #N/A 1
461 20 Keston Hiura 2B 491 441 400 1
462 20 Yoenis Cespedes OF 458 544 333 1
463 20 Diego Castillo RP/SP 420 471 #N/A 1
464 20 Sergio Romo RP 462 433 #N/A 1
465 20 Peter O'Brien OF 454 507 387 1
466 20 Adam Wainwright SP 510 #N/A 389 1
467 20 Mikie Mahtook OF 520 #N/A 379 1
468 20 Jonathan Lucroy C 517 385 #N/A 1
469 20 Neil Walker 1B/2B 413 494 #N/A 1
470 20 Tyler Austin 1B 503 492 367 1
471 20 Yoshihisa Hirano RP 494 414 #N/A 1
472 20 Alex Gordon OF 418 491 #N/A 1
473 20 Tyler Flowers C 554 357 #N/A 1
474 20 Jonathan Loaisiga SP 408 503 #N/A 1
475 20 Ervin Santana SP #N/A 456 #N/A 1
476 20 Keone Kela RP 502 411 #N/A 1
477 20 Chris Stratton SP 522 #N/A 391 1
478 20 Zack Cozart SS/2B/3B 476 438 #N/A 1
479 20 Brian McCann C #N/A 458 #N/A 1
480 20 Taylor Rogers RP 472 449 #N/A 1
481 20 Renato Nunez 3B 486 435 #N/A 1
482 20 Kolten Wong 2B 446 476 #N/A 1
483 20 Russell Martin C #N/A 461 #N/A 1
484 20 Yonny Chirinos SP 512 413 #N/A 1
485 20 Jorge Bonifacio OF 463 #N/A #N/A 1
486 20 Chris Davis 1B 442 486 #N/A 1
487 20 Freddy Galvis SS 391 538 #N/A 1
488 20 Mitch Keller SP #N/A 468 #N/A 1
489 20 Robert Gsellman SP/RP 546 #N/A 392 1
490 20 Jared Hughes RP 469 #N/A #N/A 1
491 20 Grayson Greiner C #N/A 469 #N/A 1
492 20 Joe Panik 2B 426 513 #N/A 1
493 20 Dustin Pedroia 2B 453 487 #N/A 1
494 20 Jaime Barria SP 533 407 #N/A 1
495 20 Hernan Perez 2B/3B/OF/SS 551 393 #N/A 1
496 20 Roman Quinn OF 479 466 #N/A 1
497 20 Elias Diaz C 556 390 #N/A 1
498 20 Hunter Dozier OF 484 463 #N/A 1
499 20 Michael Taylor OF 508 440 #N/A 1
500 20 Matt Duffy SS/3B 513 436 #N/A 1
501 20 Aaron Altherr OF 574 #N/A 377 1
502 20 Greg Holland RP 530 422 #N/A 1
503 20 Chris Iannetta C 568 387 #N/A 1
504 21 Evan Gattis DH 478 #N/A #N/A 1
505 21 Todd Frazier 3B 447 510 #N/A 1
506 21 Brandon Lowe 2B 499 462 #N/A 1
507 21 Rowdy Tellez 1B 482 #N/A #N/A 1
508 21 Danny Salazar SP 456 509 #N/A 1
509 21 David Fletcher 3B 457 508 #N/A 1
510 21 Kyle Crick RP 483 #N/A #N/A 1
511 21 Seunghwan Oh RP 505 597 348 1
512 21 Ryan Borucki SP 534 524 396 1
513 21 Chris Devenski SP/RP 487 #N/A #N/A 1
514 21 Greg Bird 1B 460 515 #N/A 1
515 21 Carl Edwards Jr. RP 489 #N/A #N/A 1
516 21 Drew Smyly SP 535 447 #N/A 1
517 21 DJ Stewart OF 434 550 #N/A 1
518 21 Tyler Beede SP 493 #N/A #N/A 1
519 21 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 548 534 399 1
520 21 Dylan Cease SP #N/A 495 #N/A 1
521 21 Ji-Man Choi DH 450 541 #N/A 1
522 21 Jon Duplantier SP #N/A 496 #N/A 1
523 21 Tim Beckham SS/3B 451 543 #N/A 1
524 21 Blake Swihart C/OF #N/A 498 #N/A 1
525 21 Felix Pena RP/SP 514 600 381 1
526 21 Lou Trivino RP 519 480 #N/A 1
527 21 Daniel Norris SP 500 #N/A #N/A 1
528 21 Reyes Moronta RP 501 #N/A #N/A 1
529 21 Craig Stammen RP 467 535 #N/A 1
530 21 Dexter Fowler OF 495 512 #N/A 1
531 21 Tyson Ross SP 553 454 #N/A 1
532 21 Edinson Volquez SP 506 #N/A #N/A 1
533 21 Yairo Munoz 2B/3B/SS/OF 545 467 #N/A 1
534 21 Billy McKinney OF 474 540 #N/A 1
535 21 Nick Williams OF 461 556 #N/A 1
536 21 Carson Kelly C 593 424 #N/A 1
537 21 Derek Fisher OF 509 #N/A #N/A 1
538 21 Dan Vogelbach 1B 445 576 #N/A 1
539 21 Luiz Gohara SP 558 464 #N/A 1
540 21 Matt Moore SP 511 #N/A #N/A 1
541 21 Dustin Fowler OF 529 493 #N/A 1
542 21 Daniel Mengden SP 572 451 #N/A 1
543 21 Austin Hays OF 532 497 #N/A 1
544 21 Yusmeiro Petit RP 516 #N/A #N/A 1
545 21 Bo Bichette SS #N/A 517 #N/A 1
546 21 Drew Pomeranz SP 557 477 #N/A 1
547 21 Andrew Suarez SP 570 465 #N/A 1
548 21 Anthony Swarzak RP 561 475 #N/A 1
549 21 Lonnie Chisenhall OF 492 546 #N/A 1
550 21 Daniel Robertson SS 579 460 #N/A 1
551 21 Steve Cishek RP 515 525 #N/A 1
552 21 Matt Davidson 3B 521 #N/A #N/A 1
553 21 Martin Prado 3B 523 #N/A #N/A 1
554 21 Zach Davies SP 527 521 #N/A 1
555 22 Chad Pinder SS/2B/OF 600 452 #N/A 1
556 22 Trevor Hildenberger RP #N/A 526 #N/A 1
557 22 Jacob Faria SP #N/A 527 #N/A 1
558 22 Jason Castro C #N/A 528 #N/A 1
559 22 Justin Miller RP 528 #N/A #N/A 1
560 22 Mitch Garver C 624 432 #N/A 1
561 22 Devon Travis 2B 496 561 #N/A 1
562 22 Manny Pina C #N/A 529 #N/A 1
563 22 Christian Vazquez C 604 457 #N/A 1
564 22 Will Harris RP 531 #N/A #N/A 1
565 22 Keon Broxton OF 552 511 #N/A 1
566 22 Tony Kemp OF 480 583 #N/A 1
567 22 Nick Martini OF 498 567 #N/A 1
568 22 Dakota Hudson RP 507 564 #N/A 1
569 22 Justin Anderson RP 536 #N/A #N/A 1
570 22 Eric Lauer SP 587 488 #N/A 1
571 22 Ray Black RP 538 #N/A #N/A 1
572 22 Jedd Gyorko 1B/3B 518 559 #N/A 1
573 22 Brad Miller SS 539 #N/A #N/A 1
574 22 Logan Allen SP #N/A 542 #N/A 1
575 22 Chance Sisco C 615 472 #N/A 1
576 22 Max Stassi C #N/A 545 #N/A 1
577 22 Adam Conley SP/RP 524 569 #N/A 1
578 22 Brandon Drury 3B/OF 547 #N/A #N/A 1
579 22 Austin Romine C #N/A 548 #N/A 1
580 22 Hector Neris RP 612 485 #N/A 1
581 22 Austin Riley 3B #N/A 549 #N/A 1
582 22 Tyler Saladino 2B/SS 549 #N/A #N/A 1
583 22 Logan Forsythe 2B/3B 550 #N/A #N/A 1
584 22 Travis Jankowski OF 616 484 #N/A 1
585 22 Martin Maldonado C 571 530 #N/A 1
586 22 Tyler Mahle SP 630 473 #N/A 1
587 22 Fernando Romero SP 566 537 #N/A 1
588 22 Sean Reid-Foley SP #N/A 552 #N/A 1
589 22 Alen Hanson 2B 626 481 #N/A 1
590 22 Kevin Plawecki C #N/A 554 #N/A 1
591 22 Jace Fry RP 634 474 #N/A 1
592 22 Tom Murphy C #N/A 555 #N/A 1
593 22 Yangervis Solarte 2B/3B/SS 627 483 #N/A 1
594 23 Austin Dean OF 555 #N/A #N/A 1
595 23 Jordan Zimmermann SP 540 572 #N/A 1
596 23 Phillip Ervin OF 542 571 #N/A 1
597 23 James McCann C #N/A 558 #N/A 1
598 23 Amir Garrett SP 559 #N/A #N/A 1
599 23 Matt Adams 1B 584 536 #N/A 1
600 23 Jerad Eickhoff SP 631 489 #N/A 1
601 23 Ian Kennedy SP 560 #N/A #N/A 1
602 23 Bud Norris RP 644 479 #N/A 1
603 23 Jordy Mercer SS #N/A 562 #N/A 1
604 23 Tony Watson RP 526 598 #N/A 1
605 23 David Hernandez RP 562 #N/A #N/A 1
606 23 Ryne Stanek RP 563 #N/A #N/A 1
607 23 Brad Brach RP 564 #N/A #N/A 1
608 23 Clint Frazier OF 611 518 #N/A 1
609 23 Matt Wieters C #N/A 565 #N/A 1
610 23 Clayton Richard RP 565 #N/A #N/A 1
611 23 Mark Canha 1B #N/A 566 #N/A 1
612 23 A.J. Reed 1B 567 #N/A #N/A 1
613 23 Erik Gonzalez SS #N/A 568 #N/A 1
614 23 Caleb Ferguson RP 569 #N/A #N/A 1
615 23 Derek Dietrich 2B 641 499 #N/A 1
616 23 Jesse Chavez RP #N/A 570 #N/A 1
617 23 Nate Jones RP 581 560 #N/A 1
618 23 Jarrod Dyson OF #N/A 573 #N/A 1
619 23 Brandon Finnegan SP 573 #N/A #N/A 1
620 23 Kevin Newman SS #N/A 574 #N/A 1
621 23 Travis D'Arnaud C #N/A 575 #N/A 1
622 23 Pat Neshek RP 575 #N/A #N/A 1
623 23 Joakim Soria RP 620 533 #N/A 1
624 23 J.T. Riddle SS 577 #N/A #N/A 1
625 23 Howie Kendrick 2B/OF #N/A 578 #N/A 1
626 23 Jose Iglesias SS 578 #N/A #N/A 1
627 23 John Gant SP 625 531 #N/A 1
628 23 Max Fried SP 576 581 #N/A 1
629 23 Richie Martin SS #N/A 579 #N/A 1
630 23 Nick Hundley C #N/A 580 #N/A 1
631 23 David Bote 2B/3B 580 #N/A #N/A 1
632 23 Kaleb Cowart 3B 582 #N/A #N/A 1
633 23 Shawn Armstrong RP #N/A 582 #N/A 1
634 23 Dylan Floro SP/RP 583 #N/A #N/A 1
635 23 Jo Adell OF #N/A 584 #N/A 1
636 23 JaCoby Jones 3B 622 547 #N/A 1
637 23 Victor Caratini C/1B #N/A 585 #N/A 1
638 23 Nick Tropeano SP 586 #N/A #N/A 1
639 23 Shelby Miller SP #N/A 587 #N/A 1
640 23 Austin Wynns C #N/A 588 #N/A 1
641 23 Cam Gallagher C 588 #N/A #N/A 1
642 23 Victor Victor Mesa OF #N/A 589 #N/A 1
643 23 Jeff Hoffman RP 589 #N/A #N/A 1
644 23 Wilmer Difo 2B 585 594 #N/A 1
645 23 Gerardo Parra OF #N/A 590 #N/A 1
646 23 Adam Cimber RP 590 #N/A #N/A 1
647 23 Curtis Granderson OF #N/A 591 #N/A 1
648 24 Mike Montgomery SP/RP 591 #N/A #N/A 1
649 24 Magneuris Sierra OF 592 #N/A #N/A 1
650 24 Miguel Rojas 1B/2B/3B/SS #N/A 592 #N/A 1
651 24 Daniel Ponce de Leon SP 636 551 #N/A 1
652 24 A.J. Puk SP 594 #N/A #N/A 1
653 24 Tyler Wade SS 595 #N/A #N/A 1
654 24 Nick Gordon SS 596 #N/A #N/A 1
655 24 Tyler Chatwood SP 597 #N/A #N/A 1
656 24 Taylor Ward C 598 #N/A #N/A 1
657 24 Kyle Barraclough RP #N/A 599 #N/A 1
658 24 Jose Castillo RP 599 #N/A #N/A 1
659 24 Adam Engel OF 601 #N/A #N/A 1
660 24 Nick Goody RP 602 #N/A #N/A 1
661 24 Hector Rondon RP 610 596 #N/A 1
662 24 Taylor Widener SP 603 #N/A #N/A 1
663 24 Jharel Cotton SP 605 #N/A #N/A 1
664 24 Brett Phillips OF 648 563 #N/A 1
665 24 Manny Banuelos SP 606 #N/A #N/A 1
666 24 Addison Reed RP 607 #N/A #N/A 1
667 24 David Freese 1B/3B 608 #N/A #N/A 1
668 24 Jon Jay OF 623 595 #N/A 1
669 24 Adalberto Mejia SP 609 #N/A #N/A 1
670 24 Andrew Cashner RP/SP 613 #N/A #N/A 1
671 24 Dylan Covey SP 614 #N/A #N/A 1
672 24 Ryan Tepera RP 639 593 #N/A 1
673 24 Fernando Rodney RP 617 #N/A #N/A 1
674 24 Thomas Pannone SP 618 #N/A #N/A 1
675 24 Robbie Grossman OF 619 #N/A #N/A 1
676 24 Nate Lowe 1B 621 #N/A #N/A 1
677 24 Bartolo Colon SP 628 #N/A #N/A 1
678 24 Matt Bush RP 629 #N/A #N/A 1
679 24 Junior Guerra SP 632 #N/A #N/A 1
680 24 Jacob Barnes RP 633 #N/A #N/A 1
681 24 Ty Blach RP 635 #N/A #N/A 1
682 24 Joe Biagini SP/RP 637 #N/A #N/A 1
683 24 Luke Gregerson RP 638 #N/A #N/A 1
684 24 Taylor Cole RP 640 #N/A #N/A 1
685 24 Josh Fields RP 642 #N/A #N/A 1
686 24 Charlie Tilson OF 643 #N/A #N/A 1
687 24 Melky Cabrera OF 645 #N/A #N/A 1
688 24 Chris Shaw 1B 646 #N/A #N/A 1
689 24 Francis Martes SP 647 #N/A #N/A 1

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Nick Mariano's Early-Round Avoids in H2H Points Leagues (Premium Content)


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Nick Mariano's Players to Target in H2H Points Leagues (Premium Content)


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2020 Fantasy Baseball Advice 2020 Fantasy Baseball Draft Strategy & Tips Editor Note Featured Baseball #2 MLB Analysis RotoBaller - All Fantasy Sports Articles

RotoBaller H2H Draft Strategy Primer

Fantasy baseball, much like the sport itself, it is one of the more complex to follow closely. Compared to fantasy football, in which nearly every league was head-to-head before the advent of best-ball, fantasy baseball comes in a variety of formats. Many leagues are roto-style, 5x5 category-scoring, with cumulative season-long stats. While that is the most common format, head-to-head is quickly catching up.

In H2H formats, you have one opponent to beat by whatever guidelines your league has set out. The advantage is a greater emphasis on strategy for every portion of the season, as it may be harder to catch up from behind in a roto league after the All-Star break. This requires a different approach to weekly lineup management but also draft day strategy.

In this article, we will discuss general strategies and advise what type of players to target to give you an edge on draft day. After all, we are your secret weapon!

 

General Strategy

Fantasy baseball drafts are all about mitigating risk early and taking chances on breakouts later. In traditional redraft leagues, the first few rounds should build your foundation. High-floor players like Nolan Arenado, Anthony Rizzo, Freddie Freeman, etc. are always great picks (around their ADP), given their age and consistent production, even though they aren't flashy. High ceilings are pretty but don't let them blind you. The last thing you want to do is lose your draft in the first few rounds chasing a prospect or sleeper.

This year, in particular, players like Javier Baez and Trevor Story are being drafted insanely close to the first round. We've seen roughly a year of the first-round production that would warrant such a pick. While they could pay off and even overperform their draft position yet again, if either were to bust, as they have in the past, it could be ugly. You do not want to reach for these types of players; if they to fall to you in round two or three, then, by all means, pull the trigger.

Breakout players and overperformers pop up every year. As long as you are vigilant throughout the season, it should be easy enough to pick out a few from the waiver wire and boost your team's ceiling. Just last year, Juan Soto, Jesus Aguilar, Miles Mikolas, Adalberto Mondesi, and German Marquez were all available on the wire at one point or another in most leagues.

Rules of thumb I like to follow include:

  • Not drafting injured or suspended players
  • Finding market inefficiencies with ADP, especially in ESPN leagues where ADP's are oftentimes extremely skewed from the consensus.
  • Grabbing highly touted rookies and prospects who haven't proven themselves yet. Typically, they have reasonable ADPs later in the draft. Take them over guys who "are who they are" and don't provide much upside. Just don't hold to the prospects too long if they don't get called up.

 

Points Leagues

First off, if you're playing in a season-long points league or simply want more details, we've already got a full Points League Primer available here.

A points league is the most simple fantasy format to play in. Not to say that anyone who plays in one or prefers it is by any means lower than those in H2H categories or Roto leagues, but that the advice that could be given is much more limited. The objective at its core is to score more points than your opponent on a weekly basis. It's very bare-bones and simple and I understand why so many people enjoy it. There is a lot less to worry about (especially with pitchers) and they can definitely be more fun if the scoring format is set up to have high weekly totals.

The strategy to best navigate a points league draft is essentially Best Player Available. There is not much more to that. Either make your own spreadsheet with tiered/ranked players or find one online (we've got you covered there too) that provides you a solid list to go by come draft time.

Points leagues typically favor pitching, therefore it is best to try to grab a couple of aces early. Make sure you know your settings and aren't hurting yourself by grabbing someone who walks too many batters if walks are penalized harshly. More often than not, the best pitchers in points leagues are those that compile the most strikeouts and pitch the most innings. Make sure the Robbie Ray and Chris Archer types are boosted in your rankings because of it.

Hitters might have weird values in comparison as doubles, triples, and walks could be valuable whereas, in a standard 5x5 category league with average, none of those would necessarily matter. Players who are not typically hyped up about in fantasy articles could have a ton of value later in drafts because they compile atypical statistics that do not fit standard category formats. Strikeouts oftentimes count against you in points formats, which hurts top-100 hitters such as Giancarlo Stanton, Joey Gallo, Khris Davis, Justin Upton etc.

A few final points:

  • Know your league
  • Don't fret if a drafted player underperforms or gets hurt. Replacement value is easier to find
  • Streaming pitching is almost a must. Without having to worry about ERA or WHIP, you are free to grab as many starters as you are allowed to per week to give you a competitive advantage over your opponent

 

H2H Categories Leagues

This format offers a ton of variety. Whether it be 5x5, 6x6, 7x7, with average or OBP or OPS etc., there is something for everybody. The mix of skill required and categorical volatility per week makes it more nerve-wracking than points formats but also more rewarding when you do come out on top.

The way to play the format changes slightly if the scoring is based on one-win per week or roto scoring. If all you are seeking each week is a win, a one-category advantage is all you really need - everything else is overkill. Roto scoring in H2H formats necessitates dominating your opponents on a weekly basis and makes punting a category more damaging.

One-Win Format

This format is the more "punt-friendly" of the two and gives owners plenty of leeway per week. The best way to go about winning your draft in base 5x5 is by focusing on bats who rack up Runs, HR, RBI, SB, and high-strikeout pitchers. Focusing on having an edge in these five categories gives you an extremely high floor to work off of. You allow the percentage categories such as average/OBP/OPS, ERA, WHIP to play themselves out during the week. Streaming two-start pitchers and hitters in favorable ballparks (Coors, Great American etc.) gives you the competitive edge necessary per week.

Rotisserie Format 

You have to be a little more careful when each category matters; managing percentage categories is like walking on thin ice. Neither punting nor streaming are as viable which makes nailing the draft as important as ever. You should target players who do not hurt you anywhere while helping you as much as possible in each category. It is best to devalue a hitter like Joey Gallo if AVG matters or Adalberto Mondesi if OBP matters. You don't want tankers on your team unless they're available at an extreme discount.

 

Final Thoughts

Unless your league does not allow in-season pickups, there is one point I can not stress enough... closers don't matter! Do not pay for saves on draft day. Take discounts on saves, sure, but don't reach for Edwin Diaz, Blake Treinen, Aroldis Chapman, etc. Treinen, for example, was available in the back-end of the draft last season. This season, he's getting drafted over Joey Votto and Lorenzo Cain. Take one of those guys, and then draft one (or more) of Trevor May, Pedro Strop, or Alex Colome. If you can't find the next Treinen in any of these players, rest assured that there are always saves available on the waiver wire, they just might not come from the most attractive candidates.

Pay attention to closer situations throughout the year and pounce when the time is right or even getting near. Grabbing CLEWs (Closers en Waiting) during the season is beneficial in more ways than one. If they get the job, great! You just acquired a closer for dirt cheap and probably took saves away from an opponent. In the meantime, CLEWs typically provide excellent ratio boosts and strikeouts.

Closers are volatile and fungible. If a replacement-level outfielder struggles with his bat, he could make up for it with his play on the field (or vise-versa). If a closer struggles, he could be demoted and rendered worthless. Do not waste precious draft capital on a closer.

While leagues aren't won on draft day, they can be lost. Hitters are like real estate, keep it safe and invest most of your picks there early on. They don't get injured as often as pitchers and don't hurt you as much if they slump. If a pitcher gets his ratios blown up, that's harder to come back from than a bat in a temporary slump. Risk management is the name of the game on draft day. Take your chances with picks after the first 10 rounds where even the "safe" players often bust or end up on the wire.

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2020 Fantasy Baseball Advice 2020 Fantasy Baseball Projections & ADP Analysis Editor Note Featured Baseball MLB Analysis RotoBaller - All Fantasy Sports Articles

Starting Pitcher - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

Fantasy experts are placing a bigger emphasis on drafting elite starters early this year. It is apparent this strategy is making its way across the fantasy community, as the high-end starters are being valued higher than before. In points leagues, this is a wise methodology, as an ace can serve as the backbone of a fantasy team. Seven different SPs tallied over 600 points in standard formats, whereas only six hitters reached that mark. Even Mike Trout failed to reach that level of production thanks to a reduced at-bat total. Picking the right starter can put you ahead of the game early on. For that reason, we're going to share our early version of points league rankings for points leagues.

These rankings for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats come courtesy of our lead analysts: JB Branson, Nick Mariano, and Bill Dubiel (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros). We’ve broken them down into tiers, for your viewing pleasure. As you may know, in this format, pitchers get a bigger boost for wins and complete games (what are those?), while they are penalized for losses and total bases allowed.

In case you missed it, check out our analysis on catcherfirst basesecond base, third base, and outfield. Now, let's take a look at the 2019 starting pitcher points league rankings.

 

2019 Points League Rankings: Starting Pitcher

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Max Scherzer SP 3 2 4
2 1 Jacob deGrom SP 6 6 5
3 1 Chris Sale SP 5 5 8
4 1 Justin Verlander SP 9 9 13
5 1 Corey Kluber SP 13 11 9
6 2 Aaron Nola SP 11 13 18
7 2 Gerrit Cole SP 19 18 22
8 2 Blake Snell SP 23 21 24
9 2 Carlos Carrasco SP 26 24 27
10 2 Clayton Kershaw SP 32 31 25
11 2 Luis Severino SP 30 28 33
12 2 Trevor Bauer SP 34 32 34
13 3 Patrick Corbin SP 36 35 45
14 3 James Paxton SP 43 46 38
15 3 Walker Buehler SP 40 45 43
16 3 Zack Greinke SP 39 44 47
17 3 Noah Syndergaard SP 45 52 44
18 3 Stephen Strasburg SP 46 54 46
19 4 German Marquez SP 52 48 51
20 4 Jack Flaherty SP 55 51 54
21 4 Michael Clevinger SP 48 53 68
22 4 David Price SP 58 59 57
23 4 Jameson Taillon SP 59 62 58
24 4 Miles Mikolas SP 61 71 80
25 4 Jose Berrios SP 82 79 59
26 4 Zack Wheeler SP 69 82 69
27 4 Michael Foltynewicz SP 81 80 83
28 4 Charlie Morton SP 89 86 92
29 5 J.A. Happ SP 94 105 95
30 5 Rick Porcello SP 98 103 99
31 5 Madison Bumgarner SP 106 95 104
32 5 Masahiro Tanaka SP 100 110 100
33 5 Kyle Hendricks SP 101 106 103
34 5 Chris Archer SP 117 108 116
35 5 Kyle Freeland SP 116 124 115
36 5 Luis Castillo SP 127 131 130
37 5 Andrew Heaney SP 134 122 139
38 5 Nick Pivetta SP 137 143 134
39 6 Jonathan Gray SP 152 159 118
40 6 Carlos Martinez SP 158 160 119
41 6 Dallas Keuchel SP 148 149 146
42 6 Cole Hamels SP 155 157 145
43 6 Robbie Ray SP 157 155 164
44 6 Rich Hill SP 160 162 165
45 7 Nathan Eovaldi SP 168 183 177
46 7 Yu Darvish SP 178 207 149
47 7 Eduardo Rodriguez SP 169 185 181
48 7 Collin McHugh SP 167 203 178
49 7 Zack Godley SP 189 180 188
50 7 Kyle Gibson SP 194 192 193
51 7 Sean Newcomb SP 195 189 196
52 7 Ross Stripling SP 182 219 183
53 7 Jose Quintana SP 196 193 197
54 7 Shane Bieber SP 186 223 186
55 7 Marco Gonzales SP 208 197 195
56 7 Hyun-Jin Ryu SP 188 216 #N/A
57 7 Jon Lester SP 198 211 198
58 7 Josh James SP 203 195 226
59 8 Alex Wood SP 219 226 202
60 8 Jake Arrieta SP 210 232 209
61 8 Kenta Maeda SP 220 229 217
62 8 Dereck Rodriguez SP 230 265 215
63 8 Michael Fulmer SP 223 255 233
64 8 Mike Minor SP 227 262 223
65 8 Tyler Glasnow SP 238 239 239
66 8 Tyler Skaggs SP 231 247 245
67 8 Alexander Reyes SP/RP 239 248 240
68 9 Carlos Rodon SP 257 252 254
69 9 Kevin Gausman SP 264 254 248
70 9 Derek Holland SP 240 273 261
71 9 Joe Musgrove SP 251 266 259
72 9 Trevor Williams SP 266 267 250
73 9 Matt Boyd SP 253 268 263
74 9 Anibal Sanchez SP 268 270 269
75 9 Steven Matz SP 267 300 252
76 9 Jake Junis SP 291 264 266
77 9 Mike Soroka SP 280 272 281
78 9 Julio Teheran SP 311 256 267
79 9 CC Sabathia SP 260 301 273
80 10 Chase Anderson SP 274 296 274
81 10 Jhoulys Chacin SP 277 292 277
82 10 Yusei Kikuchi SP 273 288 289
83 10 Reynaldo Lopez SP 272 293 293
84 10 Tanner Roark SP 303 275 282
85 10 Joey Lucchesi SP 285 294 285
86 10 Trevor Cahill SP 278 322 278
87 10 Jimmy Nelson SP 243 316 321
88 10 Dylan Bundy SP 302 302 302
89 11 Julio Urias SP 309 304 308
90 11 Seth Lugo SP/RP 307 323 305
91 11 Vincent Velasquez SP 315 318 312
92 11 Trevor Richards SP 305 342 304
93 11 Mike Fiers SP 308 346 306
94 11 Jesus Luzardo SP 321 315 331
95 11 Tyler Anderson SP 337 317 318
96 11 Marcus Stroman SP 378 329 276
97 11 Freddy Peralta SP 333 328 329
98 11 Dinelson Lamet SP 324 350 319
99 11 Sandy Alcantara SP 332 334 327
100 11 Brent Honeywell SP 362 324 320
101 11 Caleb Smith SP 347 341 343
102 12 Brandon Woodruff SP 325 367 #N/A
103 12 Jose Urena SP 352 344 #N/A
104 12 Mike Leake SP 338 382 328
105 12 Danny Duffy SP 349 348 353
106 12 Jake Odorizzi SP 353 340 357
107 12 Brad Keller SP 351 345 356
108 12 Forrest Whitley SP 350 347 358
109 12 Ivan Nova SP 335 383 338
110 12 Jordan Montgomery SP 355 353 #N/A
111 12 Corbin Burnes SP/RP 343 379 341
112 12 Ryan Yarbrough SP 364 352 361
113 12 Jeff Samardzija SP 363 349 366
114 12 Taijuan Walker SP 374 363 354
115 12 Lucas Giolito SP 354 399 345
116 12 Framber Valdez SP 366 #N/A #N/A
117 12 Michael Wacha SP 369 361 370
118 12 Clay Buchholz SP 377 378 355
119 12 Felix Hernandez SP 386 381 349
120 12 Pablo Lopez SP 371 398 351
121 12 Sonny Gray SP 348 401 #N/A
122 12 Wade LeBlanc SP 358 390 388
123 13 Lance Lynn SP 397 374 371
124 13 Jason Vargas SP 382 386 #N/A
125 13 Touki Toussaint SP 387 389 #N/A
126 13 Matt Harvey SP 403 #N/A 382
127 13 Gio Gonzalez SP 415 391 380
128 13 Zach Eflin SP 408 400 378
129 13 Aaron Sanchez SP #N/A 402 #N/A
130 13 Wily Peralta SP/RP 419 404 383
131 13 Joe Ross SP 441 387 390
132 13 Adam Wainwright SP 426 413 389
133 13 Anthony DeSclafani SP 432 405 393
134 13 Chad Kuhl SP 411 #N/A #N/A
135 13 Matt Shoemaker SP 412 415 #N/A
136 14 Nick Kingham SP 422 433 386
137 14 Ryan Borucki SP 436 #N/A 396
138 14 Danny Salazar SP 418 417 #N/A
139 14 Felix Pena RP/SP 455 423 381
140 14 Jeremy Hellickson SP 439 425 397
141 14 Chris Stratton SP 427 464 391
142 14 Luke Weaver SP 420 436 #N/A
143 14 Robert Gsellman SP/RP 429 465 392
144 14 Michael Pineda SP 442 418 #N/A
145 14 Wei-Yin Chen SP 425 438 #N/A
146 14 Mike Montgomery SP/RP 437 #N/A #N/A
147 14 Dylan Covey SP 447 #N/A #N/A
148 14 Marco Estrada SP 454 445 #N/A
149 14 Daniel Mengden SP 452 #N/A #N/A
150 14 Brandon Finnegan SP 453 #N/A #N/A
151 14 Yonny Chirinos SP 458 457 #N/A
152 14 Luiz Gohara SP 493 431 #N/A
153 14 Dan Straily SP 462 #N/A #N/A
154 14 Chris Devenski SP/RP 475 450 #N/A
155 14 Diego Castillo RP/SP 465 #N/A #N/A
156 14 Alex Cobb SP 474 466 #N/A

 

Starting Pitcher Rankings: Upper Tiers

Tier One

Max Scherzer stands as the obvious top pick on this list. Like a fine wine, Scherzer is getting better with age in all the best ways. He has raised his strikeout rate five straight years incredibly, up to 12.24 K/9 in 2018. He's thrown at least 200 innings for six straight years and at least 170 innings for nine seasons. Then there are the 15+ wins in seven of the last eight seasons, the fact he's kept his walk rate under league average since 2011. Yeah, he's the best pitcher around and worth a top-five pick easily.

Between Jacob deGrom and Chris Sale, Bill is the only of our experts who prefers the reigning NL Cy Young winner. The only possible concern with Sale is health-related, as his 158 IP led to an overall SP14 finish in points leagues. Sale led all starters in WHIP (0.86) and strikeout rate (13.5 K/9), so the upside is definitely worth a first-round pick. After his career year, deGrom finished fourth in points scored thanks to a 1.70 ERA, 0.91 WHIP and 269 strikeouts, all of which ranked top-five in the majors. There almost certainly will be some regression in store, as deGrom allowed a whopping 28 home runs in 2017 before dropping that total to 10 HR last year. On the other hand, he's got to win more than 10 games this year. This is the Mets we're talking about, not the Knicks.

Justin Verlander ranks fourth among our experts, although he actually finished second in total points last year. He posted his best ERA since 2011 and the lowest walk rate of his entire career (4.4%) last season. At 35 years of age, just one more than Scherzer, Verlander is as solid a pick as you can get. If he slips into the second round for some reason, there is zero reason to hesitate before pouncing on him.

Tier Two

All three of our analysts put Aaron Nola ahead of Gerrit Cole, even though Cole racked up 52 more strikeouts in his first year as an Astro. The main reason - Nola's ERA was a half-run lower thanks to an 82.5% strand rate that ranked fifth among qualified starters. Cole wasn't far behind at 77.9% LOB% but that number could go up if his ground ball rate regresses closer to his career average. In his first year in the American League, Cole's 36% GB% was 10 full points lower than the previous year, probably in exchange for a more aggressive approach that led to the spike in strikeouts. Nola has youth on his side but it's not a given that he will outproduce Cole this season.

Blake Snell came away with fancy hardware to show he was the American League's best pitcher last year, but he comes in at number eight in our points league rankings. Aside from the fact his 9.1% walk rate was slightly higher than some of his counterparts, he outperformed a few of his expected stats such as his .246 WOBA which came in 26 points lower than his xWOBA. Wins are also somewhat volatile and it's hard to see Snell winning 21 games again for Tampa.

Clayton Kershaw barely hangs in as a top-10 SP, mainly because his body is starting to betray him. Kershaw has only cracked the 200-inning mark once in the last five years with a variety of injuries. When he's on the mound at anything close to 100%, he's still the same ace though. 20 of his 26 starts went for quality starts and his uncharacteristically high 3.45 SIERA was still good for 15th among starters with at least 150 IP. Kershaw saw his strikeout rate decline to the lowest point since his rookie year but his command isn't leaving him, as a 4.5% BB% shows. Again, it all boils down to health. If Kershaw can stay fresh with the occasional missed turn in the rotation and avoid any flareups in his knee, shoulder, or anywhere else for that matter, he could still be good for a top-10 SP finish.

 

Starting Pitcher Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Three

A move to Washington may not be as helpful to Patrick Corbin as expected. Once hitter-friendly Chase Field got the humidor treatment last year and saw it's Park Factors drop to 11th for runs and 19th for home runs. By contrast, National Park was third for runs and fifth for home runs. Then again, Corbin pitched better away from home, posting a 2.80 ERA on the road. His 2.91 SIERA and jump to a 15.6% swinging strike rate (third behind only Scherzer and Sale) show that he pitched like an ace last season and could be undervalued. Seeing as how the Diamondbacks and Nationals finished with the exact same record, it's hard to suggest he'll win more games, especially if Bryce Harper skips town. Corbin could still be a pitcher to target in the first three rounds if you go SP-heavy.

Another top pitcher who switched teams, James Paxton undeniably has a better team context in 2019. Back to Park Factors, he goes from a stadium in Seattle that was 15th for HR to slugger-friendly Yankee Stadium, which saw the sixth-highest rating. For a pitcher that allowed more fly balls than grounders last year, it could be a concern. It also should be noted that his 160.1 IP last year were the most of his career. There are certainly safer picks in this format, such as Zack Greinke and Noah Syndergaard who came in at the bottom of this tier.

Walker Buehler made quite the splash in last year's postseason, striking out 29 batters in 23 2/3 innings while posting a 0.84 WHIP. This shouldn't be surprising, as it followed up a stellar rookie year in which he would have finished eighth in ERA (2.62) and came away with a .315 xWOBACON that was in the top six percent of the league. Buehler induced grounders half the time and his strikeout rate got better in September and October. If not for his relative lack of experience, the numbers say Buehler should easily be a top-10 fantasy starter.

Tier Four

St. Louis starters Jack Flaherty and Miles Mikolas both make appearances in the fourth tier, with Flaherty nearly 20 spots higher in our overall rankings. But why? Mikolas' 1.3 BB/9 was the lowest among all starters who threw as many as 120 innings, while his 9.2% HR/FB% registered in the top 10. He also posted an excellent 18-4 record and reached the 200-inning mark. The one thing missing was an elite strikeout rate. Mikolas prefers to induce soft contact, whiffing just 6.55 batters per nine. The younger Flaherty had very different results, striking out 10.85 per nine IP and walking more than twice as many batters on average. He also finished with a losing record of 8-9. The upside is there with Flaherty but Mikolas seems built for points leagues as an innings-eater who will rarely make a bad start.

It appears Bill is as enamored with the talent of Jose Berrios as I am, putting him a full 20 spots higher than both Nick and JB. Berrios was a mild disappointment in 2018, failing to take that next step forward to become a frontline starter worthy of his ADP. He did improve to a 3.31 K/BB and lower his BAA to .220. As one of just eight pitchers to register multiple complete games, he should be appreciated a bit more in points leagues. The Twins may not be significantly better than last year but a modest improvement in their offense with some more refinement in Berrios' command could lead to 15 wins, 200+ IP, and a top-20 SP finish.

Charlie Morton parlayed his success in Houston to the first fat contract of his career by signing a two-year, $30 million deal with Tampa. There's definitely some risk here: Morton is now 35 years old, has a TJ surgery on his resume, and is leaving one of the best pitching staffs and lineups in baseball. Oh, and now he gets to face the Yankees and Red Sox a bunch more times. It feels as if Morton's value may have peaked, with little chance he'll repeat his 15-3 record. He's kept a sub-4.00 SIERA each of the last six years and his strikeout rate keeps trending upwards. On paper, there is little reason to doubt his performance, but a few intangibles would make me a bit hesitant to take him before Madison Bumgarner or Masahiro Tanaka.

Tier Five

Let's talk about MadBum now, shall we? There are some who feel Bumgarner is no longer among the fantasy elite. We would all heartily agree. Bumgarner hasn't been the same since his fateful dirt bike accident. His swinging strike rate has dropped to 9.2%, the lowest since 2012. He allowed 89% contact inside the zone last year, two points above league average. Worst of all, he's only won 10 games the last two years after winning 18, 18, and 15 the three previous seasons. He's been the subject of trade talks in the offseason but no real offers have materialized. If he does move to a contending team, he'll certainly have a better lineup around him but it won't make him the same pitcher from before.

Luis Castillo and Nick Pivetta are popular sleepers that will probably be selected higher than the 120-130 range we've assigned them. Castillo was a flop last year, finished as the SP57 in standard points leagues. He only registered 11 quality starts in 31 attempts. Most alarming was a line drive rate that skyrocketed from 12.2% to 21.8% and a ground ball rate that fell from 58.8% to 45.9%. Those figures are more in line with what we should expect from him but the good news is that he improved his control with a 3.37 K/BB that outdid his rookie year. There could have been some bad luck at play, as his 3.69 xFIP was lower than his 4.32 FIP and a strand rate of 71.2% may go up.

Pivetta had even worse fortune, posting nine quality starts out of 32. He fell to 7-14 on the year, often hurting his owners with subpar performances. Like Castillo, he actually had a solid 3.42 xFIP and an extremely low 69% LOB%. With some small strides and some better luck, he could see his win totals rise, especially if the Phillies land a big fish like Harper to accompany Cutch.

 

Starting Pitcher Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Six

Once again, Mr. Bill makes some bold calls with Jon Gray and Carlos Martinez ranked much higher than his colleagues. I can't say I disagree. Gray was perhaps the unluckiest pitcher of 2018, posting a 5.12 ERA despite a solid 3.68 SIERA that ranked 17th-best among qualified starters! He's in the prime of his career at 27 years old, with a one-year deal to serve as motivation. He strikes out just over a batter per inning and simply has to see positive regression in that 18.1% HR/FB.

CarMart had some off-the-field distractions, bounced between the rotation and the bullpen, and never really got into a groove last year. He's expected to rejoin the rotation and also could be primed for a bounce back season, assuming he cuts down that 11.5% walk rate down to previous levels.

Robbie Ray never seems to get enough respect, despite being the strikeout machine he is. Ray is another 27-year-old on a one-year deal that could pay huge dividends in the middle portion of a draft. His walk rate was admittedly terrible but injuries wiped out part of his season and can be blamed for his erratic control, at least more than usual. The main reason Ray takes a big dive in the points league rankings is the fact he's never reached 175 innings pitched in a season. Peg him for a spot as your fourth or fifth starter.

Tier Seven

The biggest discrepancy of any pitcher on our rankings comes courtesy of Yu Darvish. With a high of 149 and a low of 207, it seems JB has him closer to the eighth tier while Bill is betting on a comeback. The ADP drop has been drastic - he was 30th overall in 2018 drafts but is available at 157 at the moment. If all systems are go entering Spring Training, this could be a steal.

Collin McHugh also has some wide gaps in opinion, with Nick being the most bullish this time. As of this writing, McHugh will be afforded an opportunity to take back the rotation spot that was his before the Astros became World Champions. He was highly effective out of the pen last year, holding a 1.99 ERA and striking out 11.7 batters per nine. His career numbers as a starter are somewhat mediocre though. There isn't a lot of risk taking McHugh outside the top 200, just don't reach expecting a breakthrough season at age 31.

Jon Lester is an unexciting name at the bottom of this group that can be a reliable source of innings; he's tossed at least 180 for 11 seasons in a row. It was an interesting turn in his profile, as his ground ball rate dropped by 8.5%, his hard hit rate was at its highest over any full season, his strikeout rate fell below 20%, yet his strand rate climbed by 11.6% and his ERA improved to 3.32. He somehow parlayed this luck into 18 wins too, while nearly every other Cubs starter scuffled at times in 2018. Even at the latter stages of a draft, Lester seems like a risky pick if the wins aren't there and the strikeouts don't come back.

Tier Eight and Higher

Jake Arrieta's ERA has risen for three straight seasons while his strikeout rate has declined for four straight, down to 19.1%. It doesn't look like his velocity is coming back any time soon, so don't be surprised if he slips another notch this year.

Giants starter Dereck Rodriguez may be the face of the rotation if the team moves Bumgarner and goes full-blown rebuild. The former Twins prospect had a nice rookie year with a 2.81 ERA and 1.13 WHIP over 19 starts. He can't be ranked much higher unless he strikes out more than 6.7 per nine though.

Tyler Glasnow has no problem putting batters away with his heater but he has been known to give up more than the occasional free pass. Upon moving to Tampa last year at the trade deadline, he suddenly had a home run problem too. Glasnow could continue to harness his control and become a reliable starter but it's a bit premature to label him the next Blake Snell. Keep him in mind as a late-round flier.

Kevin Gausman is another starter who switched teams midway through last season, this time to far superior results. Gausman saw his ERA drop to 2.87 over 10 starts in Atlanta and now has a good shot to actually post a winning record for the first time in his career. He's never been a strikeout artist, however, so he'll need the help of his lineup to provide some offense in order to gain a boost in points.

Trevor Williams is a similar pitcher who will never have fans lining up K cards in the stands a la Randy Johnson in his heyday. He does limit hard contact and rarely gives up the long ball, making him a solid performer in this format if he can sustain his second-half success. Williams finished as the SP32 in points leagues last year, outscoring Noah Syndergaard despite pitching only 16 more innings.

Some undervalued players in tier nine and above include: Steven Matz, Joey Lucchesi, Jimmy Nelson, Yusei Kikuchi, Seth Lugo, Mike Fiers, and Mike Leake.

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2020 Fantasy Baseball Advice 2020 Fantasy Baseball Projections & ADP Analysis Editor Note Featured Baseball MLB Analysis RotoBaller - All Fantasy Sports Articles

Relief Pitcher - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

It’s never too early to start looking toward the fantasy baseball season, and I’m here to continue RotoBaller’s position-by-position rankings analysis series for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats with the ever-volatile relief pitcher position. The "closer carousel" seems to spin faster and faster every year, and there are very few names in the 'set it and forget it' category. We recommend locking down at least one top-flight RP and then filling in during the late rounds or on the waiver wire.

Our mixed-league points staff rankings come straight from the minds of JB Branson, Nick Mariano, and myself (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros). We’ve got them broken down into tiers for both the sake of digestible content and because your rankings should always be tiered. For our purposes here, pitchers get a boost for saves but dinged for blown saves.

You can also check out our analysis on catcherfirst basesecond base, third base, and outfield while you're at it. Don't forget to bookmark all of our preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball rankings for mixed leagues. Check back regulary for updates throughout the coming months as you prepare to dominate on draft day. Without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 relief pitcher points league rankings for January.

 

2019 Points League Rankings: Relief Pitcher

Ranking Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Edwin Diaz RP 44 41 42
2 1 Blake Treinen RP 62 66 62
3 1 Craig Kimbrel RP 66 64 66
4 1 Kenley Jansen RP 70 75 70
5 2 Brad Hand RP 83 91 85
6 2 Aroldis Chapman RP 87 93 88
7 2 Felipe Vázquez RP 107 98 101
8 2 Sean Doolittle RP 111 127 127
9 2 Josh Hader RP 125 133 117
10 2 Kirby Yates RP 126 126 129
11 3 Corey Knebel RP 138 123 147
12 3 Roberto Osuna RP 133 145 136
13 3 Raisel Iglesias RP 135 139 140
14 3 Wade Davis RP 146 142 157
15 3 Seranthony Dominguez RP 170 148 150
16 3 Jose Leclerc RP 162 165 167
17 3 Will Smith RP 176 158 166
18 3 Andrew Miller RP 156 190 163
19 4 Alexander Colome RP 187 179 187
20 4 David Robertson RP 183 194 184
21 4 Brandon Morrow RP 191 210 191
22 4 Dellin Betances RP 204 225 203
23 4 Kenneth Giles RP 197 218 221
24 4 Mychal Givens RP 229 202 228
25 4 Drew Steckenrider RP 228 205 227
26 5 Jose Alvarado RP 233 209 231
27 5 Cody Allen RP 218 253 251
28 5 Archie Bradley RP 245 237 243
29 5 Alexander Reyes SP/RP 239 248 240
30 5 Jordan Hicks RP 263 246 247
31 5 Arodys Vizcaino RP 271 242 256
32 5 A.J. Minter RP 276 260 264
33 5 Jeremy Jeffress RP 275 258 275
34 5 Zach Britton RP 254 287 #N/A
35 5 Trevor May RP 259 295 #N/A
36 5 Adam Ottavino RP 279 280 280
37 6 Shane Greene RP 296 283 296
38 6 Seth Lugo SP/RP 307 323 305
39 6 Matt Strahm RP 314 #N/A 311
40 6 Jeurys Familia RP 329 311 325
41 6 Chad Green RP 330 333 339
42 6 Ty Buttrey RP 368 337 334
43 6 Corbin Burnes SP/RP 343 379 341
44 6 Brad Peacock RP 373 357 #N/A
45 6 Yoshihisa Hirano RP 342 393 #N/A
46 6 Seung Hwan Oh RP 383 384 348
47 7 Joe Kelly RP 421 394 385
48 7 Wily Peralta SP/RP 419 404 383
49 7 Pedro Strop RP 405 407 #N/A
50 7 Felix Pena RP/SP 455 423 381
51 7 Ryan Brasier RP 431 419 #N/A
52 7 Mark Melancon RP 399 452 #N/A
53 7 Matt Barnes RP #N/A 426 #N/A
54 7 Robert Gsellman SP/RP 429 465 392
55 7 Mike Montgomery SP/RP 437 #N/A #N/A
56 7 Joe Jimenez RP 460 439 #N/A
57 7 C.J. Edwards RP 489 411 #N/A
58 7 Chris Devenski SP/RP 475 450 #N/A
59 7 Diego Castillo RP/SP 465 #N/A #N/A
60 7 Jared Hughes RP 466 #N/A #N/A
61 7 Ryan Pressly RP 471 #N/A #N/A
62 7 Yusmeiro Petit RP 496 454 #N/A
63 7 Taylor Rogers RP 477 #N/A #N/A
64 7 Kelvin Herrera RP 485 472 #N/A
65 7 Blake Parker RP 491 475 #N/A
66 7 Lou Trivino RP 486 #N/A #N/A
67 7 Steve Cishek RP 500 477 #N/A
68 7 Craig Stammen RP 492 #N/A #N/A
69 7 Dakota Hudson RP 494 #N/A #N/A

 

Relief Pitcher Points League Rankings: Upper Tiers

Tier One

Edwin Diaz burst onto the scene last year with one of the more eye-popping seasons that a closer has ever had. Diaz slammed the door a league-leading 57 times while striking out an ungodly 124 hitters in just 73.1 IP, and he tacked on a shiny 1.96 ERA to boot. Diaz is still the top dog and it's not particularly close for me, even if he does regress a bit to the mean (which is all but guaranteed). He likely won't have the same amount of save opportunities given that he's now on the Mets instead of the Mariners, but there's a decent chance that the Mets middling offense has a healthy number of close games. His strikeout ratio shouldn't go anywhere even if he gets touched up a bit more, making him one of the highest-floor and ceiling RPs you'll find on draft day.

Sure the saves are impressive, but Blake "The Witch" Treinen looks upon Diaz's ERA and scoffs. A mainstay on Pitching Ninja's gif-heavy Twitter account, Treinen's 100MPH+ sinker is one of the nastiest single pitches of all-time, and due to that he was (and is) nigh-unhittable. He allowed just two homers all year, and while he likely won't finish as the top RP due to a lack of save opportunities, Treinen is perhaps the safest bet you can make at the position in 2019.

Tier Two

If anyone can challenge Diaz for the saves crown, it might be Brad Hand. The former Padre should have plenty of save opportunities closing games out for one of the AL's juggernauts, and Hand has been one of the most underrated relievers in baseball for two years now. We've got him ranked inside the top 100, and I think that's appropriate given his potential for saves and strikeouts--he's posted a K/9 of 11.2 or better in each of the last three seasons.

Speaking of underrated relievers, did you know that Kirby Yates had a 2.14 ERA last season and a microscopic 0.921 WHIP across 63 innings? I sure didn't. The unsung hero of the Padres bullpen SHOULD be afforded the opportunity to close with Brad Hand no longer in the mix and nobody else in the 'pen that approaches his level of dominance. We've got him just inside our second tier, and I think there's a chance that he jumps into the top tier if and ONLY IF the Padres are able to win more than 75 games this year.

 

Relief Pitcher Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Three

Roberto Osuna was lights-out for the Astros in his limited time with the organization last year, posting a 1.99 ERA and 12 saves across 23 appearances. Assuming he has the closer's job locked down in 2019, I think he's a top-10 RP assuming his health--the Astros will threaten to win 100 games again, and that should equate to plenty of opportunities for Osuna barring some sort of meltdown. We have him ranked this low because, well--a meltdown is possible, and his past legal issues are nothing to ignore as far as whether or not he's on the field all season.

I really want Seranthony Dominguez to be given a full shot at the closer's role, but with David Robertson making his way to Philly, I fear Dominguez may once again be relegated to a hybrid setup/sometimes closer role. He was excellent in his 54 innings last year, mowing down 74 hitters and posting a 0.931 WHIP along with a solid-yet-unspectacular 2.95 ERA. He certainly had his meltdown moments, but all-told he was remarkable for a true rookie. I have him at the very end of my top 150, but I fear I might be overly optimistic given Robertson's presence.

Jose LeClerc DEFINITELY got a hold of a bottle of Michael's Secret Stuff, because he was unreal last year. While the Rangers reliever only notched 12 saves last year, he was an animal all season--he allowed just 10 earned runs across 57.2 innings of work, and backed it up with a 0.850 WHIP and 85 strikeouts. I'm lowest among our group on him, but not by a large margin. My thinking is that he has to regress at least a little bit, but now that he's been anointed the Rangers closer, a top-10 finish is within his grasp.

Tier Four

Alex Colome has some intriguing potential as the White Sox closer, mostly because the White Sox are starting to put the pieces together to contend (I'll feel a lot more strongly about this if they land Machado). He does, however, need to win and keep the job. With Kelvin Herrera and Nate Jones waiting in the wings, it won't take many stumbles for the White Sox to move on from Colome. I do believe he'll get the first crack at the job (he's listed on their team site as the closer right now), and if he can hold onto it there is top-15 potential for him if he can save 35 games.

Mychal Givens should be given the first crack at the Orioles closer job with Brad Brach now a Chicago Cub, but I'm not sure how much value comes with that position. Givens is coming off of a sub-par 2018 in which he posted the highest ERA of his career, due largely to a depressed strikeout rate and overall hittability (not a word, I know). Assuming he wins the job and keeps it, we're looking at what, 25 saves on a really bad Orioles team? The risk outweighs the potential reward here, I won't be owning any shares of Givens this year.

Tier Five

Alex Reyes might be the pitcher I'm watching closest in the spring. With just four total innings on his resume over the last two seasons, the uber-prospect Reyes has suffered setback after setback, but he enters 2019 with a clean bill of health (supposedly). The Cardinals don't seem to be positive where he'll start the season, although I have to think they'll continue to progress him towards starting at some point before June. He will likely act as a high-leverage reliever while he gets back into shape, but he won't be closing games with Andrew Miller and Jordan Hicks ahead of him in the pecking order. For now, I'm picking up Reyes wherever I can at his current price point, because the rewards once he's starting could be tremendous.

A.J. Minter is also on my watch list for the spring, as he could quickly turn into a high-value closer should he win the job in Spring Training. Arodys Vizcaino is his main competition for the role, and he quietly had a solid 2018 when he was healthy (16 saves, 2.11 ERA across 38.1 IP). Minter was holding it down in his absence though, notching 15 saves of his own and flashing decent ratios despite being hittable at times. I think this has everything to do with the role--the Braves closer will be a high-value position, and if it's ONE of Minter or Vizcaino then that's a guy worth grabbing. If it's a mix of both, or the team decides to give the dreaded "we'll play the matchups" line, I won't like either enough to own in shallower points leagues.

 

Relief Pitcher Points League Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Six

Jeurys Familia is a victim of circumstance--with the league's top closer now on the Mets, it's unlikely Familia sees any save opportunities outside of when Diaz needs a breather or if gets injured. Still, at just 28 years of age, there is plenty left in the tank for this reliever who led the MLB in saves in 2016 (51). He's coming off a season in which he posted his highest K/9 mark, and while his 3.13 ERA was average for a closer, his FIP (2.65) indicates he might have been a bit unlucky last year. Familia likely won't be of much use in points leagues as long as Diaz is the closer, but he's somebody to put on your watch list.

Tier Seven

Joe Kelly got a guaranteed $25 million from the Dodgers over three years, and, uh...I'm not sure why. He's coming off a pretty miserable 2018 campaign in which he posted a 4.39 ERA and just barely over a strikeout per inning. He had a terrific postseason during the Red Sox march to the World Series, and I have to assume the Dodgers liked what they saw there. However, Kenley Jansen is entrenched in the closer role and Kelly has five seasons under his belt with an ERA over 3.5. Hard pass for me in all formats.

Following two outstanding seasons to start his career, Chris Devenski came down to Earth in 2018. The former All-Star saw his K/9 drop, set career highs in WHIP (1.1612), ERA (4.18), and HR/9--he gave up nine long balls in just 47.1 innings. Injuries likely played a role in his down year, and while I expect him to bounce back in 2019 there is some cause for trepidation. Devenski is one of the very few middle relievers who might carry some value in points leagues though, because the Astros have shown a willingness to use him for more than just one inning--he might not get the save, but if he throws 1.2 innings with three Ks, that's a usable outing.

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Shortstop - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

It’s never too early to start looking toward the fantasy baseball season, so I’m here to carry on RotoBaller’s position-by-position rankings analysis series for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats with the stars of the infield, the shortstops. The position is star-studded, and in roto leagues, I think I'd be comfortable with any of the top-20 names on this list. Unfortunately, the position gets pretty scarce in points leagues due to the majority's lack of power and walks. In points leagues, I want my starting shortstop selected in the first three tiers (yes, even Andrelton Simmons who is always undervalued in points leagues). 

Our mixed-league points staff rankings come straight from the minds of Nick Mariano, myself and Bill Dubiel (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros), and we’ve got them broken down into tiers, as it should be. For this format, hitters get a bump for total bases, walks and take a hit for strikeouts.

In case you missed it, check out our analysis on catcherfirst basesecond base, third base, and outfield. You can also see all of our preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball rankings for mixed leagues here. Bookmark that page and come back for updates throughout the coming months as you prepare to dominate on draft day. Without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 shortstop points league rankings for January.

 

2019 Fantasy Baseball Points League Rankings: Shortstop

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Francisco Lindor SS 7 8 6
2 1 Alex Bregman 3B/SS 10 12 10
3 1 Manny Machado 3B/SS 14 17 17
4 2 Trevor Story SS 22 27 30
5 2 Trea Turner SS 27 29 28
6 2 Xander Bogaerts SS 49 47 49
7 2 Javier Baez 2B/SS/3B 50 49 50
8 2 Carlos Correa SS 57 55 56
9 3 Corey Seager SS 73 68 74
10 3 Jean Segura SS 72 70 73
11 3 Jose Peraza 2B/SS 90 96 93
12 3 Gleyber Torres 2B/SS 112 111 102
13 3 Andrelton Simmons SS 120 113 122
14 4 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 141 118 126
15 4 Elvis Andrus SS 132 128 135
16 4 Adalberto Mondesi 2B/SS 86 129 194
17 4 Jonathan Villar 2B/SS 147 147 160
18 4 Marcus Semien SS 171 169 173
19 4 Tim Anderson SS 174 173 175
20 4 Amed Rosario SS 190 182 189
21 5 Eduardo Escobar SS/3B 200 191 199
22 5 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 199 187 208
23 5 Paul DeJong SS 215 199 212
24 5 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 214 212 201
25 5 Lourdes Gurriel 2B/SS 202 231 #N/A
26 5 Ketel Marte SS 225 214 222
27 5 Jorge Polanco SS 256 251 268
28 6 Johan Camargo 2B/3B/SS 359 281 258
29 6 Nick Ahmed SS 304 303 303
30 6 Didi Gregorius SS 316 308 313
31 6 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 320 306 316
32 6 Willy Adames SS 336 330 332
33 6 Scott Kingery SS/3B/OF 356 343 359
34 7 Dansby Swanson SS 365 351 362
35 7 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 381 365 346
36 7 Troy Tulowitzki SS 384 #N/A 347
37 7 Franklin Barreto SS 367 380 363
38 7 Ehire Adrianza SS/1B/3B 406 372 342
39 7 Brandon Crawford SS 357 406 364
40 7 Orlando Arcia SS 413 377 #N/A
41 7 Brendan Rodgers SS 434 375 395
42 7 Fernando Tatis Jr. SS 414 424 #N/A
43 7 Tim Beckham SS/3B 445 441 #N/A
44 7 Addison Russell SS 461 443 #N/A
45 7 Zack Cozart SS/2B/3B 463 447 #N/A
46 7 Kike Hernandez 2B/SS/OF 459 451 #N/A
47 7 J.P. Crawford SS 468 459 #N/A
48 7 Matt Duffy SS/3B 476 458 #N/A
49 7 Asdrubal Cabrera SS/2B/3B 483 460 #N/A

 

Shortstop Points League Rankings: Top Tiers

Only one player in all of baseball reached 700 PA in both 2017 and 2018, and that player was Francisco Lindor. He exceeded our fantasy expectations for the fourth straight season, setting career-highs in Runs (129), HR (38), RBI (95), and SB (25). His lofty run total tied AL MVP Mookie Betts for the league lead, and his 38 bombs were good for the sixth-most. The power outburst is certainly intriguing from the 25-year-old, as he increased his total in the HR category for the third straight year. Lindor’s HR/FB ratio only jumped three points from 2017, while his hard-hit rate jumped even further up over 41% which shows that he’s not stumbling his way into these numbers. Outside of Mookie Betts and Mike Trout, no hitter comes with a fantasy floor as high as Lindor, which is a great comfort to have with your first-round draft pick. The kid is so consistent, he’s registered the same 0.65 BB/K ratio for three straight years! It’s not Khris Davis batting average-consistent yet, but rather impressive nonetheless.

That next stud is Alex Bregman. Fantasy aside, this kid is a phenomenal hitter. His 1.13 BB/K ratio was the third-best in all of baseball and his 157 wRC+ beat out Arenado and Machado. He's slated to hit in the two-hole behind George Springer and in front of Jose Altuve, Carlos Correa, and Michael Brantley. If the elite plate discipline continues, then Bregman is a serious threat for reaching triple-digit runs and RBI again in 2019 along with 25+ HR and 10+ SB with a BA hovering around .290. If you can snag him after the first turn in the second round, the LSU product will easily return value this season. People often forget this guy is still just 24 years old.

Where is Manny Machado going to sign? I don't have the answer, but honestly, does it matter? If he can be fantasy relevant with the Orioles, he can play anywhere and we'll still like him as a top-20 guy in points leagues. If he ends up in PHI or NYY I would bump him up a few spots overall, maybe even sneaking into the first round, but I like the current spot if he winds up with CHW or SD. He has hit at least 30 HR in four straight seasons, three of those going for more than 35, and reached double-digit steals in two of those. The BB/K ratio isn't anywhere near that of Bregman but the 26-year-old has never struck out more than 120 times.

Tier Two

The only guy who loves Trevor Story more than me is my colleague, Nick Mariano. We both ranked him in the top-10 in our mixed league rankings, but still acknowledge the small dip in value for points leagues. Story contributed across all five roto categories in his breakout season, hitting 37 HR and 108 RBI with 27 SB. The whiffs did improve by nine points from 2017, but are still occurring over a quarter of his ABs which is his only limiting factor. Regardless the Rockies shortstop is still a solidified top-30 player thanks to his massive amount of XBH, sexy hard-hit pulled-flyball profile, and playing half his games at Coors Field.

I am truthfully not a huge Trea Turner fan outside of roto, as I see him as an over-hyped Whit Merrifield, but the 15/40 floor at the top of the Nationals lineup is hard to deny. He hit 19 bombs while scoring 103 R and swiping 43 bases last season, while increasing his BB% by three points. Turner is a ground-ball hitter with a mediocre hard-hit rate, which caps the potential for repeating or building on the 19 HR, but he is a safe source of points thanks to the elite speed and a lock for another triple-digit run total.

Xander Bogaerts is easily the least sexy name in this tier, but it's hard to find a much safer option at the position. The world champ provides modest numbers all around, and should be hitting cleanup for the the Sox in 2019. He set a career-high with 23 HR and 103 RBI last year on his way to a personal-best 133 wRC+ last season, and his 0.54 BB/K is the highest of the tier. You'll never feel super excited about drafting the X-Man, but you will certainly never regret it either.

 

Shortstop Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Three

After injuries ruined the end of his 2017 season, many of us expected Corey Seager to bounce back to his 2016 form where he finished as the 43rd-ranked player in fantasy. Instead, the poor guy needed Tommy John surgery before the month of April was over. The recovery looks to be going well, and Seager himself is even optimistic that he will be ready by the season opener. I value a healthy Seager the same I do Bogaerts. The only reason I rank them 19 spots apart is the question mark of how long or successful the recovery truly is.

Anyone else exited to watch this Phillies offense? Whether they land Bryce Harper or not, this will be a vastly improved team with the acquisitions of Andrew McCutchen and our SS#10 Jean Segura. The 28-year-old has hit over .300 in three straight seasons, each with double-digit HR and at least 20 SB. He cut his K% by four points and is a threat for 200 hits over a full season. If he can get himself into the top third of that lineup, much easier sans-Harper, he will be a great value at his current ADP.

A Reddit reader brought up the question of why we were so low on Gleyber Torres in our points league rankings. Allow me to explain. First, his 25.2 K% is worrisome, and in the same territory of Javier Baez and Trevor Story. That is admittedly some good company, but Torres isn't hitting .290 with 30+ HR and 20+ SB to offset the whiffs like the other two. Secondly, he is most likely going to hit in the bottom half, maybe the bottom third of the lineup which should "cap" his run scoring production. Third, the 17.9 HR/FB% isn't sustainable based on his minor league track record which means even with a full season of PA I don't see the HR total from 2018 increasing by more than a few. Lastly, in points leagues that reward total bases, its worth noting that Torres only hit 17 XBH outside of those 24 HR. The most optimistic projection system (THE BAT) for Torres projects him and Brian Dozier very similarly, who we have ranked back-to-back in the second base rankings. Wrong position for this article, but still helps deliver the point. I honestly think its a very generous rankings for a guy that looks eerily similar to a guy two tiers down.

Tier Four

This is when the points league formats starts really sapping shortstops of their value. The question marks and strikeouts are growing rapidly, while the on-base ability is shrinking. Adalberto Mondesi and Jonathan Villar are prime examples. The fourth tier is a solid point to fill your MIF slots if your league uses them.

Regarded as a top prospect not too long ago, Jurickson Profar finally stayed in the bigs for a full season in 2018 and he did not disappoint. The 25-year-old hit 20 HR and stole 10 bases and showed off some impressive versatility. He made at least 10 appearances at every infield position (besides catcher), and joins an underrated Oakland Athletics squad loaded with offensive potential. Profar should be manning the keystone position for the A's every day in 2019, and his numbers don't show any strong reasons to believe you can't expect another 20/10 campaign with a healthy BB/K ratio that you can stick almost anywhere in your lineup.

Like Torres, Tim Anderson suffers in points leagues that penalize for strikeouts. His 0.20 BB/K ratio was fifth lowest in all of baseball last year, despite enjoying his first 20/20 season. The discipline is slowing improving as hes cut his whiffs in each of the last three seasons, and he double his BB% to a still unimpressive 5.0%, but he still has a ways to go to climb the points league rankings. I expect another 20/20 campaign in 2019 thanks to his steady increase of flyballs and sustained HR/FB%, but outside of that there isn't a lot to love here especially with his bottom-third spot in the lineup against RHP.

For my thoughts on Amed Rosario, see the above paragraph. His plate discipline is just slightly better than Andersons, but has about half the pop. I am excited about the Mets offense this year with the acquisitions of Robinson Cano and Jed Lowrie with prospects Peter Alonso and Jeff McNeil in the background, but Rosario's spot at the bottom of the order against RHP will limit the benefits he sees from his new teammates.

Tier Five

By now, hopefully you are just looking for depth, as the fifth tier is perfect for injury/off day replacements. Remember when I said Gleyber compared to a guy two tiers down? Say hello to Eduardo Escobar. After reaching over 500 PA for the first time in his career, the 30 year old hit 23 HR and 84 RBI with a .272 BA with the Twins and Diamondbacks. His 20.0 K% is a tad unsightly, but he also boasted the highest BB% of his career. The biggest aid to his value in points leagues are the XBH. His impressive 48 doubles was second in all of baseball. He fell off after his trade to the desert, but you can't hit poorly at Chase Field for long. With Paul Goldschmidt gone, Escobar is concreted in the top third of the lineup and in addition to his 3B position eligibility he makes for a great value pick this year.

I think just about everyone in this industry saw regression heading Paul DeJong's way after an impressive rookie 2017 season. We were certainly right. Injury prevented a full sophomore season, but the BABIP plummeted 60 points and his HR/FB% came back down to earth. Despite the ugly .241 BA, the youngster still finished with 19 HR, 68 R, 68 RBI and managed to decrease his K% and increase his BB%. I believe Harrison Bader should get more looks in the two hole, meaning DeJong could see the majority of his AB down at sixth or seventh in the lineup, but high-20s power with a healthy amount of RBI will make DeJong a useful bench bat in 2019.

Here's two guys that don't really excel in any one category, but their modest all-around production plus great situations in 2019 make for easy bench picks. Ketel Marte is a 10/10 guy with a mediocre BA but hit a shocking 12 triples last year and boasted a 0.68 BB/K ratio. He ended the year strong, hitting .296 with a 126 wRC+ after the All-Star break and should be leading off for the D-backs while manning CF in 2019. If you play in daily roster move leagues, it's worth noting that you'll want this guy in your lineup against LHP. He hit .321 with a 157 wRC+ against southpaws in 2018. The next fantastically average player is Jorge Polanco. He missed the season thanks to a PED suspension, but came back with his usual 15/15-pace stuff and hit a .288 BA. Like Marte, Polanco should be hitting at the top of the lineup for the Twins this season, and will score more than enough runs to warrant a spot on your bench.

 

Shortstop Points League Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Six

I was high on Johan Camargo at the beginning of the off-season as a sneaky value pick, but the resigning of Nick Markakis makes him much less appealing. The signing occurred after these rankings were submitted, and honestly, he can probably safely be dropped down to tier seven. His best path to playing time aside from an injury to Josh Donaldson, not that big of a stretch, is through the continued struggles of Dansby Swanson. He's best left on the waiver wire at the beginning of the season.

Willy Adames showed flashes of promise in his first half season of MLB play last year, hitting 10 HR with a .278 BA while swiping six bases. He's always possessed a healthy BB% through the minors, and it carried over to his short MLB stint, but the strikeouts more than negated it. The 29.4 K% was just painful, and the minor XBH return (only seven doubles) won't make it worth rostering Adames in 2019.

Hot damn, what an ugly rookie season it was for Scott Kingery. He was given every possible chance with the big league level, but just wasn't able to figure it out. One year after lighting up the minor leagues with 26 HR and 39 SB, Kingery hit just .226 in 147 games, with eight bombs and 10 SB. The strikeouts weren't quite Willy Adames level, but the 0.19 BB/K ratio leaves a ton of room for improvement. Unfortunately for him, the window of opportunity has now closed in 2019 with the acquisition of Jean Segura and Andrew McCutchen and the emergence of Cesar Hernandez. The slight ray of hope for Kingery is the fact that he hit "better" against RHP (63 wRC+ vs 57 against LHP), and has the ability to play the corner outfield positions. That could open up some platoon possibilities with Nick Williams, but the most likely scenario is Kingery remains as a super-utility type in 2019.

Tier Seven

I'll be up front, we may be too low on Orlando Arcia, I mean at least the guy has a starting role. That's more than we can say for the previous three guys. He is just one year removed from a 15 HR, 14 SB, .277 BA campaign. He took a huge step back in 2018 however, hitting just three HR in 366 PA, seeing his BB/K ratio drop from 0.36 to 0.17, and having his BA bottom out. The silver lining was his second half turn-around. After the All-Star break, Arcia hit .290, giving fantasy owners some hope that a return close to 2017 is within the realm of possibility this year. It's not likely, but I'm saying there's a chance, which at this point in your drafts, it's worth it. 

The rest of this tier contains low upside bench-fillers like Brandon Crawford, Niko Goodrum, and Troy Tulowitzki (for half a season), and then high-upside stashes like Brendan Rodgers and Fernando Tatis Jr. I don't see Rodgers being relevant for 2019 redrafts with Garrett Hampson and Ryan McMahon helping bridge the infield gap for his eventual shot. But I'll gladly take a flier on Tatis Jr in the late rounds of drafts this year. Whether the Padres wait for two weeks or after June to call him up, I want a piece of that 30/30 potential once he arrives.

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Outfield - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

It’s never too early to start looking toward the fantasy baseball season, so I’m here to continue RotoBaller’s position-by-position rankings analysis series for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats with the incredibly deep outfield position. There is a seemingly neverending stream of useful bats, but there are still clear chokepoints where the risk portfolio thickens. I'd suggest buying at least two anchors and then letting your speculative plays run.

Our mixed-league points staff rankings come straight from the minds of myself, JB Branson and Bill Dubiel (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros), and we’ve got them broken down into tiers for both the sake of digestible content and because your rankings should always be tiered. For this exercise, hitters get a bump for total bases, walks and take a hit for strikeouts.

Keep an eye out for all other positions to follow! In the meantime, you can also see all of our preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball rankings for mixed leagues here. Bookmark that page and come back for updates throughout the coming months as you prepare to dominate on draft day. Without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 outfield points league rankings for January.

 

2019 Fantasy Baseball Points League Rankings: Outfield

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Mike Trout OF 1 1 1
2 1 Mookie Betts OF 4 4 2
3 1 J.D. Martinez OF 12 10 11
4 1 Christian Yelich OF 15 14 14
5 1 Bryce Harper OF 17 15 19
6 1 Ronald Acuna OF 21 19 16
7 2 Aaron Judge OF 31 25 20
8 2 Charlie Blackmon OF 28 33 29
9 2 Juan Soto OF 24 26 41
10 2 Andrew Benintendi OF 29 36 31
11 2 Kris Bryant 3B/OF 33 38 32
12 2 Giancarlo Stanton OF 37 37 37
13 3 Rhys Hoskins 1B/OF 42 40 40
14 3 George Springer OF 51 42 35
15 3 Cody Bellinger 1B/OF 47 43 48
16 3 Whit Merrifield 2B/OF 54 50 53
17 3 Starling Marte OF 53 63 52
18 3 Khris Davis OF 56 57 55
19 3 Lorenzo Cain OF 63 65 64
20 4 Michael Brantley OF 76 69 71
21 4 Eddie Rosario OF 74 76 78
22 4 Mitch Haniger OF 75 83 91
23 4 Aaron Hicks OF 85 88 87
24 4 David Peralta OF 93 84 84
25 4 Nick Castellanos OF 88 85 89
26 4 A.J. Pollock OF 99 87 76
27 4 Justin Upton OF 91 92 94
28 4 Tommy Pham OF 92 90 96
29 5 Andrew McCutchen OF 104 99 107
30 5 Marcell Ozuna OF 108 100 108
31 5 Ender Inciarte OF 113 109 106
32 5 Nick Markakis OF 110 107 112
33 5 Jesse Winker OF 115 120 113
34 5 Yasiel Puig OF 118 116 120
35 5 Gregory Polanco OF 119 121 121
36 5 Ryan Braun 1B/OF 130 119 132
37 5 David Dahl OF 122 141 124
38 5 Michael Conforto OF 128 132 131
39 5 Brandon Nimmo OF 161 152 79
40 5 Wil Myers 3B/OF 124 135 143
41 6 Eloy Jimenez OF 142 136 152
42 6 Dee Gordon 2B/OF 144 137 154
43 6 Victor Robles OF 145 140 156
44 6 Jose Martinez OF/1B 149 151 141
45 6 Harrison Bader OF 159 171 128
46 6 Kyle Schwarber OF 173 154 138
47 6 Shin-Soo Choo OF 154 153 162
48 6 Stephen Piscotty OF 153 156 161
49 6 Joey Gallo 3B/1B/OF 151 175 158
50 6 Mallex Smith OF 163 161 168
51 6 Ian Desmond OF/1B 179 172 144
52 7 Odubel Herrera OF 181 176 182
53 7 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 199 187 208
54 7 Brett Gardner OF 205 200 204
55 7 Corey Dickerson OF 209 201 207
56 7 Nomar Mazara OF 211 198 210
57 7 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 214 212 201
58 7 Hunter Renfroe OF 222 213 219
59 7 Matt Kemp OF 226 204 232
60 8 Brandon Belt 1B/OF 221 240 218
61 8 Trey Mancini 1B/OF 232 221 230
62 8 Ian Happ 3B/OF 235 227 224
63 8 Austin Meadows OF 234 222 234
64 8 Teoscar Hernandez OF 241 235 216
65 8 Adam Jones OF 247 228 225
66 8 Randal Grichuk OF 236 230 237
67 8 Billy Hamilton OF 250 220 241
68 8 Ramon Laureano OF 249 243 246
69 8 Max Kepler OF 258 236 255
70 9 Adam Eaton OF 248 245 260
71 9 Jackie Bradley Jr. OF 255 234 265
72 9 Kyle Tucker OF 289 217 257
73 9 Kole Calhoun OF 262 244 262
74 9 Domingo Santana OF 246 282 244
75 9 Brian Anderson 3B/OF 270 250 272
76 9 Franmil Reyes OF 265 286 249
77 9 Steven Souza Jr. OF 292 278 253
78 9 Manuel Margot OF 269 284 271
79 9 Jake Bauers 1B/OF 283 269 279
80 10 Jason Kipnis 2B/OF 286 277 286
81 10 Daniel Palka OF 294 261 294
82 10 Cedric Mullins OF 290 274 292
83 10 Scott Schebler OF 287 298 288
84 10 Josh Reddick OF 301 299 301
85 10 Franchy Cordero OF 281 320 #N/A
86 10 Kevin Kiermaier OF 298 314 298
87 10 Kevin Pillar OF 310 305 309
88 10 Byron Buxton OF 312 307 310
89 10 Carlos Gonzalez OF 323 310 307
90 10 Tyler O'Neill OF 306 321 #N/A
91 10 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 320 306 316
92 11 Adam Duvall 1B/OF 322 312 317
93 11 Willie Calhoun OF 326 319 322
94 11 Jake Cave OF 318 358 315
95 11 Jay Bruce OF/1B 331 332 #N/A
96 11 Bradley Zimmer OF 340 336 336
97 11 Yoenis Cespedes OF 346 335 333
98 11 Delino DeShields OF 344 355 #N/A
99 11 Scott Kingery SS/3B/OF 356 343 359
100 11 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 370 359 350
101 11 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 381 365 346
102 11 Jason Heyward OF 380 364 376
103 11 Lewis Brinson OF 391 368 365
104 11 Avisail Garcia OF 361 369 401
105 11 Raimel Tapia OF 360 414 360
106 12 Eric Thames 1B/OF 400 376 372
107 12 Joc Pederson OF 396 397 369
108 12 Mikie Mahtook OF 410 385 379
109 12 Mark Trumbo OF 393 392 #N/A
110 12 Aaron Altherr OF 402 403 377
111 12 Jorge Soler OF 389 427 373
112 12 Steven Duggar OF 401 395 #N/A
113 12 Albert Almora Jr. OF 392 428 375
114 12 Peter O'Brien OF 423 410 387
115 12 Alex Verdugo OF 457 432 384
116 12 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 443 435 399
117 12 Jorge Bonifacio OF 428 #N/A #N/A
118 12 Nick Williams OF 424 437 #N/A
119 12 Phillip Ervin OF 438 #N/A #N/A
120 12 Derek Fisher OF 446 434 #N/A
121 12 Ben Zobrist 2B/OF 467 416 #N/A
122 12 Dustin Fowler OF 448 #N/A #N/A
123 12 Leonys Martin OF 451 456 #N/A
124 12 Kike Hernandez 2B/SS/OF 459 451 #N/A
125 12 Michael Taylor OF 469 461 #N/A
126 12 Chris Owings 2B/3B/OF 478 455 #N/A
127 12 Dexter Fowler OF 482 470 #N/A
128 12 Mac Williamson OF 484 #N/A #N/A
129 12 Travis Jankowski OF 487 #N/A #N/A
130 12 Jose Osuna 1B/OF 499 #N/A #N/A

 

Outfield Points League Rankings: Upper Tiers

Tier One

Make no mistake, the points format would have to be incredibly pitcher-friendly for you to pass up Mike Trout at No. 1. I understand that’s perfectly possible, but we run the risk of normalizing just how great Trout is due to his lack of flair and postseason record, in my opinion. The amateur meteorologist has been a first-round stud for seven seasons even though he’s just 27 years old, as even injuries in the past two seasons haven’t kept him from crossing the 30 HR/20 SB threshold in each year. With a wild 20.1% walk rate thrown on top of the action last season, Trout’s your alpha.

If you don’t have the first overall pick or an auction strategy that supplies you with Trout, then any of Betts, Martinez, Yelich, Harper and Acuna will surely suffice as an offensive anchor. The two Red Sox are established hitting stars, while Yelich only has one killer year under his belt but it came once he was freed from Miami’s awful park/team environment so there’s hope for lesser regression. Harper’s 18.7% walk rate trailed only Trout in the OF department (min. 200 PAs) and while he’s without a team at the moment, we need to remember he has 40-homer pop, 20-steal wheels and a swing capable of a .330 average as he enters his age-26 season. Acuna is the “outlier” without a full big-league season but has 30/20/.300 skills to flex atop Atlanta’s lineup with all of the PAs that provides despite the 25% strikeout rate.

Tier Two

Fear not if you missed out on the top six, as the next six are pretty damn good too. You can see Bill and JB agree on Judge being the best of this bunch, as he fought through an injury to produce a .919 OPS after posting a mammoth 1.049 OPS during his 52-homer rookie campaign. He turns 27 in April and will likely always bring a 30% strikeout rate with him, but a 15% walk rate and a real shot at 230 R+RBI in that lineup/stadium helps bring balance.

Call me crazy, but I’d rather have Soto over Judge in this format, which will cause Bill to backhand slap me. I know, I know. But the .923 OPS and 16% walk rate against 20% strikeout rate as an age-19 rookie using all fields is just beautiful. That kind of plate discipline and bat control doesn’t grow on trees and I’m here in case he brings that K rate below his BB rate like he often did in the Minors. Let’s be clear, you’re happy with either.

Blackmon and Benintendi are on opposite sides of the aging curve, but both offer a solid HR+SB floor while getting a R+RBI boost by hitting in the upper third of a high-octane offense. Bryant’s shoulder injury dinged his 2018 but we know he’s a special talent and while he may still have a lower fly-ball rate and tempered power returns, a healthy KB means an OBP around .400 and around 200 R+RBI. Meanwhile Stanton’s “down season” saw him stay off of the DL for the second straight season while reaching both 100 runs and 100 RBI with 38 dingers.

Tier Three

While I’d prefer to have the Tier Three group be my second outfielder, there’s no shame in bulking up the rest of your squad and having one of these lead the way. Hoskins is a thrilling young talent who won’t have to worry about manning the outfield anymore. Springer gets to feast atop Houston’s batting order and even with terrible baserunning and an uninspiring average, he’s a threat for 700 PAs and volume makes him a big player.

We’re all largely in step on these guys, but it’s worth noting JB is a bit lower on Marte. This is likely due to a walk rate that’s lucky to hold around 6% and an OPS that’s only topped .790 once in his last four seasons. Not to mention Pittsburgh’s rebuild is going to hinder those counting stats, which also need to bake in Marte’s durability. Between injuries and a suspension, he’s only played in more than 150 games once with a career-high mark of 633 PAs.

 

Outfield Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Four

Here’s where the depth of OF talent really starts to make itself known. We’re going beyond the top-25 with this crop and yet you’re still dealing with top-100 players -- none of us have a single player in the triple digits. Those with notable gaps in the ranks are Haniger, Peralta and Pollock. Please note that Pollock hadn’t signed when we submitted these for article use.

Haniger’s 90-26-93-8-.285/.366/.493 line from 2018 showed that the flash in ‘17 was legitimate and his walk rate rising from 7.6% to 10.2% alongside modest hard-hit rate gains is enough for me to buy in. My bearishness on Peralta comes from trusting an age-30 breakout that hinged on his hard-hit rate exploding to 48.6% after never topping 36% before. This yielded a HR/FB rate that jumped from 12.2% in ‘17 to 23.4% in ‘18, but his OPS still sat at .868 with 162 R+RBI.

Pollock deserves more love from me now that I know he’s embedded in LAD’s lineup, though he’ll need to stem the awful plate discipline he showed last season. His walk rate fell a bit (from 7.5% to 6.7%) while his K rate went from 15.2% to 21.7% on the back of a career-worst 10.7% swinging-strike rate. At least it came with a career-best .228 ISO and his going 13-of-15 on steal attempts, though, so the talent finds ways to show itself.

Tier Five

The fifth tier sees us widen the lens with a grouping over 10, but they’re all worthy of your attention. While a few of these guys are “boring” (aka stable commodities), there’s a ton of upside mixed with a low floor. Boring can work a bit better in points leagues than other formats due to the value of accumulators. Targeting playing time and PAs is a good formula.

One of everyone’s favorite “sleepers,” Jesse Winker, can be found here. Winker’s .366 wOBA was 33rd out of 313 players with at least 250 PAs while his xwOBA was 36th, but he also needs to learn to hit lefties (career 15-for-82 vs. LHP). At least he demolishes righties, with a career .328/.421/.503 slash line against them with nearly identical walk and strikeout rates around 14%.

We’ve found our first huge disagreement, as Bill thinks Nimmo is a top-100 bat while JB and I paint him closer to No. 150. I can see where Bill’s coming from given Nimmo’s ridiculous .404 OBP and the 20 HR/10 SB skill set, but I still see warning signs. Namely, that he can’t hit southpaws well at all. He only delivered a .234 /.351/.391 slash line while striking out in nearly one-of-three PAs in ‘18, and his career OPS of .688 vs. LHP (208 PAs) is ugly compared to the .893 OPS vs. RHP (622 PAs). The Mets aren’t shy about protecting him from lefties and may bat Amed Rosario leadoff (he hit .284 against them last season) against portsiders even if Nimmo does play.

Tier Six

This tier groups most speedsters in Gordon, Robles and Mallex Smith, but also some more one-dimensional sluggers such as Kyle Schwarber and Joey Gallo. You can see most of my ranks are tight within this band, though I disagree on Schwarber being this high while JB would likely drop Bader and Gallo into the next train.

Schwarber and Gallo both have walk rates around the 12-15% range to go with their strong swings, with Gallo’s increased homers coming with increased strikeouts. We can’t ignore that Schwarbs’s has a career-high 510 PAs while Gallo has banked 532 and 577 PAs in each of the last two seasons. Meanwhile, Bader is a defensive whiz and sports 20/20 potential, though the 29.3% strikeout rate from 427 PAs last season does cap his upside.

Tier Seven

We’re largely in step with one another in this bunch, with the biggest range comes from Matt Kemp. Now in hitting-friendly Great American Ballpark, his 14th season in the bigs may revive his power back over the .200 ISO mark. While his .290/.338/.481 line with a .190 ISO wasn’t mindblowing, he quietly turned in a career-best 26.8% line-drive rate and 43.5% hard-hit rate. That helps explain his BABIP bouncing back up to .339 after turning in marks of .311, .297 and .318 over the previous three seasons. If he keeps most of those gains then I get the love, but I’m hard-pressed to buy in at this point in the aging curve.

Tier Eight

Take chances, make mistakes, get messy! Let me lead with stating that Kepler needs to be higher, though I fully expect his preseason sleeper status to reach heights that chip away at much of the profit to be had.

If I could pick one bat to buy into for upside’s sake then I’ll take Happ, who could take a Javier Baez-ian leap in ‘19 with a similar power profile. The 2015 first-round pick started off the ‘18 season with a first-pitch homer but then cooled, posting a .761 OPS despite a 15.2% walk rate as the wild 36.1% strikeout rate left little room for bad luck.

You can see I’m also the lowest on Adam Jones and Billy Hamilton, as I’m worried Jones ends up signing onto a team that may not view him as an everyday, leadoff hitter and he needs volume to return value without a high walk rate or steals. Then there’s Hamilton, who is likely stuck batting ninth in a stadium known for its cruelty towards hitters with an uninspiring lineup around him. If his OBP is merely .300 then it’ll be the first time he’s hit that mark in three seasons.

 

Outfield Points League Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Nine

You’ve got to have faith here! Faith that Adam Eaton and Steven Souza can stay on the field. That Jackie Bradley can keep a hot streak going for more than a month. That Kyle Tucker can make it in the bigs (with relevant playing time). That Kole Calhoun won’t disappear for half the season. That Domingo Santana can reclaim some of 2016’s glory. That Brian Anderson can accumulate enough stats on the Marlins with an OPS likely under .775. That Franmil Reyes and Manny Margot can stay hot and play more than five times a week in San Diego. And that Jake Bauers won’t get platooned to irrelevance in Cleveland.

Tier 10

Here we find Byron “Best Shape of His Life” Buxton, who reportedly added 21 pounds of muscle this offseason in an effort to remain healthy and is a worthwhile flier towards pick No. 300, but he has several obstacles to overcome. He’s got a gigantic chip on his shoulder after management kept him down for all of 2018 and will probably hit ninth to open the season, though a strong spring might inspire his leapfrogging Jorge Polanco. The usual 30% strikeout rate is working against his hitting so high, though.

I’m highest on Franchy Cordero and his 70-grade raw power, but the aforementioned playing risk for Franmil Reyes goes for Cordero as well. You’re not getting away from a strikeout rate that likely settles above 30% but 154 MLB PAs saw him post a 48.2% hard-hit rate and smash seven homers while swiping five bases. He’s got 30/20 potential if he had an everyday job, but that’s impossible to vouch for at this time.

If an injury opens a lane for Tyler O’Neill to see the field regularly than you need to be there. Out of hitters with at least 50 batted-ball events, O’Neill’s 12% barrels per plate appearance rate was second only Luke Voit (12.4%) in ‘18. That would’ve evened out a bit with a bigger sample size, but the power is so real. He didn’t just luck into 26 homers over just 273 Triple-A PAs in ‘18 before getting called up, so watch his name closely.

Tier 11

Do note that Adam Duvall was ranked here before the Nick Markakis signing by Atlanta pushes his playing time further to the brink. I wouldn’t draft him if I could help it. You know that drafting Yoenis Cespedes means you’re sacrificing a bench/DL slot for the 20% chance that his heels hold up and the quads don’t strain themselves as he works back into game shape.

Instead, Bill and I would have you pay Jake Cave some mind, especially if you miss on Buxton and want to hedge against him. Not only can philosophy enthusiasts make some serious Plato jokes, but Cave quietly posted a .208 ISO in ‘18 -- tied with Haniger and just ahead of Justin Upton and Michael Conforto.

If you find yourself in leagues with only four or five bench slots then you should scoop up Niko Goodrum, Detroit’s very own Swiss-Army knife. His first full season came at 26 years old, as he smacked 16 homers while bagging 12 steals over 492 PAs (131 games). While the pop is likely maxed out, he’s shown greater speed with a 29.1 ft/sec sprint speed and he stole 84 bags between 2013-15 in the Minors.

Tier 12

The rest of the...rest, these 25 players are where you should throw caution to the wind and hunt upside. The guys I should move up a little and I think are worth your attention are Joc Pederson, Jorge Soler, Steven Duggar, Albert Almora, Leonys Martin, Enrique Hernandez and Dexter Fowler.

That last name may have caused some of you to close out the window, but Fowler’s terrible offensive season still had an 11.4% walk rate that was tied for 22nd place out of 110 outfielders with at least 300 PAs. He’ll need to hit above the Mendoza line, of course, but he’s only 33 years old and had posted an OPS of .840 and .851 in ‘16 and ‘17, respectively.

If Cleveland doesn’t do anything else between now and Opening Day, then Martin is likely their everyday centerfielder as Bradley Zimmer continues to recover. You’re not buying into any great plate discipline and he’d likely bat in the lower third of the order, but lefty-swingers taking hacks at Progressive Field are cash money.

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Catcher - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

It’s never too early to start looking toward the fantasy baseball season, and I’m here to continue RotoBaller’s position-by-position rankings analysis series for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats with the increasingly scant catcher position. Traditionally a thin position to begin with, catcher seems to be growing thinner every year as far as fantasy production is concerned. We advise that you either grab one of the surefire studs early, or go ahead and wait awhile during drafts.

Our mixed-league points staff rankings come straight from the minds of myself (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros), JB Branson and Nick Mariano , and we’ve got them broken down into tiers for both the sake of digestible content and because your rankings should always be tiered. For this exercise, hitters get a bump for total bases, walks and take a hit for strikeouts.

Keep an eye out for all other positions to follow! In the meantime, you can also see all of our preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball rankings for mixed leagues here. Bookmark that page and come back for updates throughout the coming months as you prepare to dominate on draft day. Without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 catcher points league rankings for January.

 

2019 Fantasy Baseball Points League Rankings: Catcher

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 J.T. Realmuto C/1B 105 130 114
2 1 Gary Sanchez C 121 114 123
3 2 Buster Posey C/1B 143 138 153
4 2 Yadier Molina C 166 164 170
5 2 Wilson Ramos C 175 170 176
6 2 Yasmani Grandal C 185 177 185
7 3 Willson Contreras C 201 188 200
8 3 Salvador Perez C 216 186 213
9 4 Danny Jansen C 244 309 326
10 4 Isiah Kiner-Falefa C/2B/3B 327 326 323
11 4 Francisco Cervelli C 328 338 324
12 4 Francisco Mejia C 334 331 330
13 4 Jorge Alfaro C 345 327 335
14 5 Austin Barnes C 372 360 352
15 5 Willians Astudillo C 404 356 337
16 5 Yan Gomes C 376 362 #N/A
17 5 Mike Zunino C 416 420 #N/A
18 5 Welington Castillo C 417 422 #N/A
19 5 Tucker Barnhart C/1B 430 440 #N/A
20 5 Robinson Chirinos C 435 442 #N/A
21 5 Tom Murphy C 473 469 #N/A
22 5 Tyler Flowers C 490 471 #N/A
23 5 Kurt Suzuki C 497 474 #N/A

 

Catcher Points League Rankings: Upper Tiers

J.T. Realmuto was one of my higher-ranked catchers coming into last year, and I'm happy to see him fulfill his destiny as a poor man's peak Buster Posey. That sexy combination of batting average and moderate power out of the catcher slot gives you a significant advantage right out of the gate, especially considering the state of the catcher position in 2019. I wouldn't quite consider him a top 100 player, but I could see myself edging him just inside that mark if he gets traded to a team that will help boost his run and RBI totals.

Gary Sanchez's 2018=barf emoji. After an All-Star 2017 campaign in which he hit .278 and dropped 33 bombs, he dropped off a cliff last year, finishing with just 89 games played and a miserable .186 batting average. He still hit 18 homers in that time, but in a points league that subtracts for strikeouts he was a curse--he whiffed 94 times, or more than a strikeout every game. I thought I was being aggressive by predicting a bounce-back for El Gary, but my colleagues are even more bullish than I am apparently. Keep an eye on him during drafts, and if he falls outside the top 120 pull the trigger. His place in a frightening lineup and his power potential is too good to pass up there.

Buster Posey is well-removed from his 2012 MVP season, but he is still well above average for the catcher position. His .284 average last year tied for his lowest in a season, and at age 32 Posey still represents a top option from a points perspective--and he'll come much cheaper than Sanchez/Realmuto.

I'm lowest on Yadier Molina so far, and I think by the time we get into draft season I'll have him in Tier 3. He's simply hitting that wall that comes with age, and it isn't going to get any better. Interestingly, he's posted two of the highest homer totals of his career in the last two seasons, but that makes him a better option for roto than points for me.

Wilson Ramos and Yasmani Grandal both carry very similar potential heading into 2019--top five ceiling with some injury risk. If you draft them right around where we've all got them, you won't be putting yourself at too much risk.

 

Catcher Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

I'm very interested to see what Danny Jansen brings to the table as a full-time player this season. He earned a late-season call-up at the AAA level last year, hitting .275 with 12 homers across 88 games and even chipping in five steals. I'm most interested in his nearly 1:1 walk-strikeout ratio at that level, as he collected 44 bases on balls compared to just 49 strikeouts--if that ratio is sustainable at the next level, Jansen could profile as a J.T. Realmuto-lite with the potential to blossom into the genuine article as soon as this year. I'll own him in plenty of places this year.

We are all afraid of Francisco Cervelli it seems, and with good reason. Elias Diaz emerged as a legitimate offensive threat for the Pirates in limited duty last season, hitting .286 with 10 bombs across 82 games. While I don't feel strongly enough about Diaz's ability to repeat that to rank him this early, he has me raising my eyebrows about Cervelli.

I'll likely end up owning Francisco Mejia in a bunch of spots this year as a stash for later. He hasn't adjusted to major league pitching enough in his limited MLB action to indicate he's a fantasy asset yet, but the pedigree is there and the Padres will either give him a shot to win the majority of time behind the plate or they'll trade him to a team that will do so. I'm taking the chance with one of my later picks in a bunch of drafts.

 

Catcher Points League Rankings: Lowest Tier

If you're not down with Willians Astudillo, you're not down with me. The big dude drops big boy bombs and...well he doesn't have a starting job right now probably, but he can certainly win one with a big spring. He raked in limited time in the majors last year, hitting .355 across 29 games, and while that isn't sustainable if he can keep his average above .270 or so there will be enough thump to justify a roster spot in points leagues. Just a name to keep on your watch list for the time being.

Mike Zunino has traded in his Mariners grays for Tampa Bay Rays navy blue, and while that doesn't necessarily improve his value, it doesn't kill it either. We pretty much know what Zunino is at this point--a guy who's going to float around the Mendoza Line but hit 20 moonshots while he does it. Another one for the watch list, and you'll want to pounce if he goes on a power binge.

I really want Tom Murphy to take the reins on the catcher position in Colorado, because there is fantasy value to be had there. I'm just not positive this is the year he takes a leap forward--or if there is a leap to be taken at all. His plate discipline is atrocious, and that's simply not easy to overcome at the professional level. Here's hoping he spent some time with the Jugs machine this offseason--rooting for you, Tom!

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Third Base - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

The hot corner is stacked like never before, especially with the anticipated arrival of mega-prospect Vladimir Guerrero Jr. Waiting on a third baseman won't hurt given the relative depth of the position. With the multi-position eligibility of several players on this list, one could easily grab several of these names within the first few rounds and make a well-rounded infield. In points league formats, there is no need to focus on speed, which gives a slight boost to the position as well.

These rankings for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats come courtesy of our lead analysts: JB Branson, Nick Mariano, and Bill Dubiel (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros). We’ve broken them down into tiers, for your viewing pleasure. As you may know, in this format, hitters get a bump for total bases and walks, while strikeouts provide a slight knock.

In case you missed it, check out our analysis on first base and second base. Now, let's take a look at the 2019 third base points league rankings.

 

2019 Fantasy Baseball Points League Rankings: Third Base

Ranking Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Jose Ramirez 2B/3B 2 3 3
2 1 Nolan Arenado 3B 8 7 7
3 1 Alex Bregman 3B/SS 10 12 10
4 1 Manny Machado 3B/SS 14 17 17
5 2 Kris Bryant 3B/OF 33 38 32
6 2 Anthony Rendon 3B 35 34 36
7 2 Matt Carpenter 1B/2B/3B 41 39 39
8 2 Javier Baez 2B/SS/3B 50 49 50
9 3 Eugenio Suarez 3B 60 56 61
10 3 Justin Turner 3B 65 60 60
11 3 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 3B 64 58 65
12 3 Josh Donaldson 3B 78 73 75
13 3 Miguel Andujar 3B 84 81 86
14 3 Travis Shaw 1B/2B/3B 96 94 97
15 4 Carlos Santana 1B/3B 103 97 105
16 4 Max Muncy 1B/2B/3B 102 102 151
17 4 Mike Moustakas 3B 123 115 125
18 4 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 141 118 126
19 4 Wil Myers 3B/OF 124 135 143
20 4 Matt Chapman 3B 139 146 137
21 5 Joey Gallo 3B/1B/OF 151 175 158
22 5 Yulieski Gurriel 1B/2B/3B 184 166 172
23 5 Rafael Devers 3B 177 168 180
24 5 Miguel Sano 1B/3B 165 184 179
25 5 Eduardo Escobar SS/3B 200 191 199
26 6 Maikel Franco 3B 213 215 190
27 6 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 214 212 201
28 6 Kyle Seager 3B 212 208 211
29 6 Ian Happ 3B/OF 235 227 224
30 7 Brian Anderson 3B/OF 270 250 272
31 7 Jake Lamb 3B 284 257 283
32 7 Jeimer Candelario 3B 288 297 291
33 7 Evan Longoria 3B 282 313 #N/A
34 7 Johan Camargo 2B/3B/SS 359 281 258
35 7 Isiah Kiner-Falefa C/2B/3B 327 326 323
36 7 Yolmer Sanchez 2B/3B 395 325 300
37 7 Scott Kingery SS/3B/OF 356 343 359
38 7 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 381 365 346
39 7 Ehire Adrianza SS/1B/3B 406 372 342
40 7 Ryan McMahon 1B/3B/2B 375 373 #N/A
41 7 Eduardo Nunez 2B/3B 394 370 368
42 7 Nick Senzel 3B 385 371 #N/A
43 7 Yandy Diaz 3B 398 388 374
44 7 Todd Frazier 3B 409 409 #N/A
45 7 Colin Moran 3B/1B 433 408 394
46 7 Jung Ho Kang 3B 440 #N/A 398
47 7 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 443 435 399
48 7 Tim Beckham SS/3B 445 441 #N/A
49 7 Zack Cozart SS/2B/3B 463 447 #N/A
50 7 Jedd Gyorko 1B/3B 470 463 #N/A
51 7 Chris Owings 2B/3B/OF 478 455 #N/A
52 7 Matt Duffy SS/3B 476 458 #N/A
53 7 Asdrubal Cabrera SS/2B/3B 483 460 #N/A
54 7 Logan Forsythe 2B/3B 481 468 #N/A
55 7 Matt Davidson 3B 498 476 #N/A

 

Third Base Rankings: Upper Tiers

Tier One

The top tier is topped by the same duo as our standard mixed league ranks, yet there is a slightly bigger gap between Ramirez and Arenado. This is simply due to Ramirez's incredible 1.33 BB:K that more than doubles Arenado's 0.60 BB:K. In fact, if it weren't for a guy named Mike Trout, Ramirez would be the top overall selection in points leagues, coming in as our second overall pick. The fact he slots in at either 2B or 3B might even tilt the decision in his favor for some owners on draft day.

Nolan Arenado is about as safe a pick as you can get in any format. If his number eight overall ranking seems a bit low, it's only because aces Max Scherzer, Jacob deGrom, and Chris Sale jump ahead of him, given the weighted value of high-end starting pitchers in points leagues.

As of this writing, we still don't know where Manny Machado will take his talents for the 2019 season. It won't shift his value dramatically but it would be preferable to see him in a lineup like the Phils or Yanks, as opposed to the pale hose of Chicago. Machado has improved his plate discipline the last two years, up to a 0.67 BB/K in 2018. A jump back up to 14 steals was a welcome sight as well. He is still just 26 years old and shouldn't slip past the middle of the second round.

Alex Bregman officially broke out last year and he's just 24 years old. Like J-Ram, he walked more than he struck out and will stack points across every category. Along with 31 home runs, his 51 doubles led the majors. That's a big factor to consider in points leagues, as those two-baggers can add up quickly to provide value despite being relatively worthless in 5x5 leagues.

Tier Two

Kris Bryant was one of the biggest disappointments from last season, largely due to injury. A left shoulder injury sapped him of power and effectiveness before landing him on the DL for an extended stint. Selected fifth on average in fantasy, his stock has fallen down to 33 overall in NFBC drafts. If he is truly 100% as he claims, then this could be the biggest bargain of 2019.

Anthony Rendon sees a slight bump in these rankings, coming in as the sixth-ranked 3B compared to his roto rank of ninth. He finished seventh among qualified batters with 44 doubles and holds a tidy 0.67 BB:K that is even better than Arenado. It's unclear whether the presumed absence of Bryce Harper will have a negative effect but he can't be discounted too much in this format.

Javier Baez will be a high pick in most drafts after his impressive 2018 campaign but he takes an understandable dip in points leagues due to the fact he still struck out 26% of the time and hasn't posted a walk rate over 6% across a full MLB season. Many expect regression as well, particularly in his 24.3% HR/FB rate. His 32.3% fly ball rate was actually lower than normal and his hard hit rate has been rising each of the past three years, so things could even out in terms of his HR totals. He should also maintain his status as a run-scoring and producing machine in the heart of a stacked Cubs lineup, so don't discount him too much this coming season even in points leagues, where he could potentially fall below his true value.

 

Third Base Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Three

Vladimir Guerrero Jr. has been pronounced one of the best hitting prospects of our generation before he takes a single cut on a Major League Baseball field. He's got a raw power grade of 80 and the bloodlines of a Hall of Famer, after all. While Guerrero hasn't grown into that power just yet, he's shown great plate discipline in the minors and has the upside of, well, a future Hall of Famer. You'll have to pay up for his services and hope the Jays don't hold him back too long.

Miguel Andujar will be a slightly polarizing figure this draft season, as he showed great promise in his rookie year but hasn't convinced everyone he is a budding superstar. Andujar finished second in AL Rookie of the Year voting after posting a .297/27/92 triple-crown line, sits in the middle of one of the most potent lineups in all the majors, and is just 23 years old. He also tied Mookie Betts for third in the bigs with 47 doubles. What's not to like? The fact he only walked 25 times over 606 plate appearances is a knock against him, as is the fact he may bat either sixth or seventh in the lineup. Those are minor concerns for such a talented player, but enough to keep him at the lower end of the third tier.

Travis Shaw was recently signed to a one-year deal, avoiding arbitration, and will take back the third base job even though he retains second base eligibility. Shaw hit .241 with 32 home runs and 86 RBIs last year and made great strides in plate discipline, more than doubling his BB/K ratio (0.72) from two years ago in Boston (0.32). If you choose to wait on the position, he could be a mid-round gem.

Tier Four

Former Brewer and still free agent Mike Moustakas must have a fungus or something - this marks two straight offseasons that teams are staying away from the former second overall pick despite the fact he hit 28 HR and drove in 95 runs. He posted a career-high 41.2% hard hit rate and just turned 30, so it's not as if there are multiple red flags here. His depressed value in the free agent market could once again make him a bargain in fantasy drafts.

The failed experiment of Wil Myers at third base is officially over, whether or not the club's alleged pursuit of Machado comes to fruition. Heck, maybe they should sign Moustakas and pair the corners with overpriced former Royals. Myers should be a full-time outfielder in 2019, which should help the defense in general after his impressively bad -5.4 UZR at third base followed up a -7.3 UZR at first base in 2017. The good news is that his eligibility at third base is a nice way to sneak his bat into the infield on fantasy teams. Plate discipline has never been a strong suit and his power/speed combo plays better in rotisserie leagues, where he finds himself in the third tier of our rankings. Still, Myers will carry a fairly strong slugging percentage that makes him either a low-end starter at the hot corner or an OF3.

Players like Max Muncy and Jurickson Profar have enough pop to slot in a CI spot or as a high-end backup 3B but realistically they carry more value at 2B or MI.

Tier Five

Unsurprisingly, Gallo is a full 55 spots lower in points league rankings due to a sizeable hole in his bat that seems to miss the ball 36% of the time. Three-true-outcomes hitters tend to not be popular choices in points leagues, especially in H2H because of the peaks and valleys they bring. You can't completely ignore a player that has gone deep 40+ times the last two years either.

Devers made some strides throughout the season, increasing his walk rate in the second half and hitting better against the shift (.331) than without it (.213). A lowly 15.2% LD% must be improved along with his 34.4% Hard% if wants to be considered a top slugger. At age 22, he may require more seasoning before being declared ready to jump into the higher tiers. Otherwise, he may find himself developing into the next Miguel Sano.

Speaking of Sano, it was a tough year for the Twins' third baseman, who was once thought to be a foundational piece for the franchise. Among all batters with at least 250 plate appearances, Sano posted an MLB-worst 38.5% K% and finished with a .199 average. An extended trip down to the minors didn't seem to ignite the light bulb, flip the switch, or any other sort of metaphor that would imply Sano was suddenly good again. His career .233 ISO and immense power potential is enticing but he could easily become a black hole at third base again, making him nothing more than a dice roll in the later rounds.

Eduardo Escobar was a valuable waiver wire add in 2018 but could be slightly overvalued in 2019. His breakout came on the heels of his age-30 season and he has played 150 games only once in his career. Statcast measures indicate that he may see negative regression based on xBA (.250) and xSLG (.426). He could reach the 20-HR mark with a middling average but that's nothing to get excited about at a position filled with power options.

 

Third Base Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Six

Should we believe in Maikel Franco's improved batting average of .270 and consistent, if unspectacular, track record of three straight 20+ HR seasons? Or should we be more concerned about the fact his hard hit rate dropped to 27.5% while his ground ball percentage jumped near 50%? It appears the breakout may never happen, as Franco has put up eerily similar batted ball numbers over the past four years, except for last year's unwanted shift toward soft contact. He's on a one-year prove-it deal for a team courting big-name free agents, which means his time as the starter in Philly may soon be up.

Kyle Seager was a top-10 option at third base not long ago. Now, he can be had outside the top 225 players and is our 28th-ranked third baseman, behind the mighty Joey Wendle. It's not like Seager fell off a cliff in '18, but it's concerning that his strikeout rate spiked to 21.9%, four points above his career average, while his slugging percentage dropped by 50 points. The Mariners are in a rebuild, so the RBI opportunities might be less plentiful as well.

Tier Seven

The final tier only has about 2000 players in it, so let's just highlight some key sleepers that could be well worth a late-round flier.

Brian Anderson may never be a full-blown power hitter, especially in spacious Marlins Park with a glorified Triple-A lineup around him. He showed out fairly well as a rookie, however, slashing .273/.357/400 with 65 RBI and 87 runs scored. His 34 doubles and above-average walk rate indicate some usefulness in points leagues.

Nick Senzel could be a steal if he proves fully rehabbed after multiple injuries and a bout with vertigo last year. The Reds are still making moves but Senzel is still without a clear position at the Major League level. If injury strikes or he forces his way into the lineup with a strong Spring, he could become a valuable piece.

Yandy Diaz is a name that isn't on many radars despite the fact he may become the everyday third baseman in Tampa Bay. Known more for his glove than bat, Diaz has a strong 0.59 BB/K and has shown he can hit for average in two brief Major League trials. If he holds down a starting job, he could be a cheap source of points at the end of your bench.

Colin Moran and Jung Ho Kang will be battling for the third base job in Spring Training but they may not have to. Kang has played some shortstop before and could easily beat out Erik Gonzalez in order to keep his bat in the lineup. He has limited mileage on his body after missing all last year due to a visa issue. Kang is the ultimate sleeper, whereas Moran looks to be a top prospect that may never pan out as more than a replacement-level player.

Filling Adrian Beltre's shoes is no enviable task. The Rangers are leaving it to Asdrubal Cabrera, who signed a one-year deal to play third base. He popped 23 homers along with 36 doubles last year between the Mets and Phillies. Now in the AL West, Cabrera could be a forgotten man on draft day who is more than serviceable at either 3B or SS.

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Second Base - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

It’s never too early to start looking toward the fantasy baseball season, so I’m here to carry on RotoBaller’s position-by-position rankings analysis series for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats with the keystone position. Traditionally a scarce position in fantasy, second base has truly risen over the past few years, and truthfully I'd be happy with grabbing anyone in the first four tiers (top 17) to start on my points teams. The main issue is that 12 of those top 17 are multi-position eligible, meaning you can't feel safe waiting on a second baseman this year. 

Our mixed-league points staff rankings come straight from the minds of Nick Mariano, myself and Bill Dubiel (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros), and we’ve got them broken down into tiers, as it should be. For this format, hitters get a bump for total bases, walks and take a hit for strikeouts.

Keep an eye out for all other positions to follow! In the meantime, you can also see all of our preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball rankings for mixed leagues here. Bookmark that page and come back for updates throughout the coming months as you prepare to dominate on draft day. Without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 second base points league rankings for January.

 

2019 Fantasy Baseball Points Rankings: Second Base

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Jose Ramirez 2B/3B 2 3 3
2 1 Jose Altuve 2B 18 20 12
3 2 Matt Carpenter 1B/2B/3B 41 39 39
4 2 Javier Baez 2B/SS/3B 50 49 50
5 2 Whit Merrifield 2B/OF 54 50 53
6 3 Scooter Gennett 2B 80 72 63
7 3 Daniel Murphy 1B/2B 71 78 72
8 3 Ozzie Albies 2B 77 74 81
9 3 Robinson Cano 1B/2B 79 77 82
10 3 Jose Peraza 2B/SS 90 96 93
11 3 Travis Shaw 1B/2B/3B 96 94 97
12 4 Brian Dozier 2B 109 104 110
13 4 Gleyber Torres 2B/SS 112 111 102
14 4 Max Muncy 1B/2B/3B 102 102 151
15 4 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 141 118 126
16 4 Adalberto Mondesi 2B/SS 86 129 194
17 4 Cesar Hernandez 2B 136 134 142
18 5 Dee Gordon 2B/OF 144 137 154
19 5 DJ LeMahieu 2B 172 144 133
20 5 Jonathan Villar 2B/SS 147 147 160
21 5 Rougned Odor 2B 180 174 159
22 5 Yulieski Gurriel 1B/2B/3B 184 166 172
23 6 Jonathan Schoop 2B 193 181 171
24 6 Garrett Hampson 2B 192 167 192
25 6 Jed Lowrie 2B 206 178 205
26 6 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 199 187 208
27 6 Yoan Moncada 2B 207 196 206
28 6 Joey Wendle 2B/3B/SS/OF 214 212 201
29 6 Lourdes Gurriel 2B/SS 202 231 #N/A
30 6 Luis Urias 2B 252 238 235
31 7 Jeff McNeil 2B 339 249 214
32 7 Starlin Castro 2B 293 259 287
33 7 Jason Kipnis 2B/OF 286 277 286
34 7 Ian Kinsler 2B 299 291 299
35 7 Johan Camargo 2B/3B/SS 359 281 258
36 7 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 320 306 316
37 7 Isiah Kiner-Falefa C/2B/3B 327 326 323
38 7 Yolmer Sanchez 2B/3B 395 325 300
39 7 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 370 359 350
40 7 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 381 365 346
41 7 Josh Harrison 2B 379 396 344
42 7 Ryan McMahon 1B/3B/2B 375 373 #N/A
43 7 Eduardo Nunez 2B/3B 394 370 368
44 7 Keston Hiura 2B 450 421 400
45 7 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 443 435 399
46 7 Ben Zobrist 2B/OF 467 416 #N/A
47 7 Adam Frazier 2B 449 446 #N/A
48 7 Derek Dietrich 2B #N/A 453 #N/A
49 7 Zack Cozart SS/2B/3B 463 447 #N/A
50 7 Kike Hernandez 2B/SS/OF 459 451 #N/A
51 7 Dustin Pedroia 2B 472 448 #N/A
52 7 Chris Owings 2B/3B/OF 478 455 #N/A
53 7 Asdrubal Cabrera SS/2B/3B 483 460 #N/A
54 7 Kolten Wong 2B 480 467 #N/A
55 7 Logan Forsythe 2B/3B 481 468 #N/A
56 7 Devon Travis 2B 488 462 #N/A
57 7 Joe Panik 2B 479 473 #N/A


Second Base Points League Rankings: Top Tiers

Tier One

After a surprise breakout campaign in 2017, very few, if any fantasy players were expecting Jose Ramirez to take it to an even higher level in 2018. The 26-year-old’s encore performance consisted of career-highs in Runs (110), HR (39), RBI (105), and SB (34) en route to a top-five fantasy ranking. This newfound power came at the expense of his BA, however, as he set his sights on the bleachers. He became a top-ten fly-ball hitter with the second-highest pull-rate in the majors, and it dragged JRam’s BABIP down over 60 points from 2017. This guy gets an additional boost in points leagues, as his 1.33 BB/K ratio led the majors last year, and even makes a case for the top pick against Mike Trout and Max Scherzer.

It was a disappointing 2018 for fantasy owners who took Jose Altuve in the first round, but the floor is just so solid you can never go wrong taking this Stro. We all knew the 20+ HR seasons weren't going to last forever, but the steep loss of SB is what really hurt Altuve's value. His 17 SB was the lowest output since his 57 game rookie season in 2011. Regardless of whether either category rebounds to 2016-2017 form, you have a 15-15 guy in the middle of one of the best lineups in baseball that will end a full season with over 200 hits. That more than qualifies for a second round pick, but with the depth of talent at the keystone position, you should focus on getting an ace or heavier hitter at this point in your drafts for points leagues.

Tier Two

Matt Carpenter enjoyed a career year in 2018, going yard 36 times and scoring 111 runs. Carp has always been one to tear the cover off the ball, but he has taken it to new heights after leading the entire league with an absurd 49.0 Hard%. We'd love to say we expect HR regression in 2019, but when someone is doing that to the baseball where do you expect it to go other than the stands?! His 19.1 HR/FB% was actually the lowest among hitters in the top-five Hard%. The Cardinals lineup should produce plenty of runs this year, and their powerful leadoff hitter will thrive again. I've always been a Carpenter fanboy thanks to the hard-hit rates and OBP, but the multi-position eligibility really boosts his value for me - hence the top 40 ranking. He finished 2018 as the 35th ranked player in fantasy and has the top first basemen in baseball hitting behind him this year. The fact that his 15.1 BB% ranked top 10 in the league and directly behind Jose Ramirez only makes him an even safer pick in points leagues.

Javier Baez went from a 98 wRC+ in 2017 to N.L. MVP runner up one season later. He was one of just seven players to hit 30 HR with 20 SB, and put up triple digits in both run scoring categories. All of this goodness while still striking out in a quarter of his bats for the third straight year. Can he keep up this level of production with such poor plate discipline? First off, the BA is not sustainable. His 25.9 K% ranked 14th highest in the league. Among those 14 batters, Baez had by far the highest BA, with the next closest (Giancarlo Stanton) being a whole 27 points lower. We expect the BA to drop down closer to the .273 he posted in back-to-back seasons in 2016-2017. Also, the power is bound to regress. Baez only hit a 32.3 flyball rate, with a 1.41 GB/FB ratio. Those certainly aren't prototypical power hitting profiles. On top of that, his 24.3 HR/FB% just simply isn't repeatable with his 35.8 Hard%. Bottom line, yes we expect some regression from Baez in 2019. But the bottom-bottom line is that he hits cleanup for the Chicago Cubs and has legit speed that should produce 19-21 SB again. The talent and situation should still outweigh the regression, but the terrible plate discipline drags down his value in points leagues, which is why he's ranked as an early 5th round pick by all three rankers. He won't likely reach that point in drafts, so let someone else deal with all those Ks.

Sure it took a while for Whit Merrifield to make his presence known at the big league level, but for the 2017 performance doubters, that's two consecutive fantastic seasons in a row now. In case you were not aware, it was not Trea Turner or Billy Hamilton who led the MLB in SB last season. So let's play a quick blind player comparison. Player A in 2018: 103 R, 19 HR, 43 SB, 27 doubles, .271 BA. Player B in 2018: 88 R, 12 HR, 45 SB, 43 doubles, .304 BA. You are going to take Player B, right?Player A is Trea Turner, who is being taken tenth overall on NFBC. That means Player B is our boy Merrifield, currently being drafted in the third round. Thanks to the run support in KC is ranked even lower in our points rankings. It's time to stop the madness and appreciate what the 30-year-old is doing. He doubled his BB%, increased his LD% by eight points, and increased his Hard% by six points last season. The production is here to stay, at least for a few more years until the juice in those legs runs dry.

 

Second Base Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Three

Daniel Murphy is generating a lot of buzz right now, as most players do when they join the Rockies. Injuries derailed his 2018 season, but he is just one year removed from back-to-back campaigns with at least 23 HR and a .322 BA. He is projected to hit behind Charlie Blackmon and in front of Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story. Talk about a fantasy boost. Through 120 career PA at Coors Field, he has hit 15 XBH but with a monstrous .330/.358/.536 line. If DJ LeMahieu can hit .348 at Coors, one can only imagine what kind of campaign even an aged Murph can put together. A low career K% mixed with being in the heart of a stout lineup in Coors presents a high floor, especially if the 2016-2017 mid 20s HR power returns this year.

Ozzie Albies and Jose Peraza are two youngsters that had great seasons in 2018, but take a bit of a hit in points leagues. Albies is coming off a 24/14 campaign while scoring 105 R at the top of the Braves lineup with Ronald Acuna and Freddie Freeman. But a 5.3 BB% and early projected lineups showing Snitker having Albies hit sixth in the order don't line up for a fantastic 2019 in points leagues. Peraza shocked many with a 14/23 season last year but likewise has a minute BB% and should also be hitting in the bottom third of the lineup with the acquisition of Yasiel Puig and the emergence of Jesse Winker's insane on-base abilities.

Robinson Cano is back in New York, this time sans-pinstripes. Cano missed half the 2018 season due to a PED suspension but looked completely rust-free upon his return. His half-season translates to a 20 HR, 88 R, 100 RBI campaign with a BA hovering around the .300 mark. In his 14 career games at Citi Field, Cano hit nine XBH with a .298/.344/.561 slash. If the 36-year-old's body can hold up all year, you're looking at a slightly poor man's Freddie Freeman fantasy season that you can grab outside the top-100 right now.

Tier Four

There is a new second baseman in DC, but Brian Dozier is coming off his worst offensive season since a rookie in 2012. His 21 HR were just half his 2016 output, and his 12 SB were his lowest since 2015. At 31 years old, I don't see the SB getting back over 15, but the power has to rebound and the RBI potential is limitless hitting behind Trea Turner, Anthony Rendon, and Juan Soto. If you waited out the keystone position up to this point, grabbing Dozier in the ninth round is a great reward for the patience.

Adalberto Mondesi might be the most polarizing hitter for 2019 drafts. You either are all-in on his insane 2018 numbers, 14 HR and 32 SB in 75 games, or all you can see is that 26.5 K% and 3.8 BB%. First off, these are points league rankings, so that 0.14 BB/K ratio surely matters. This is why none of our rankers have him near the top 50 NFBC ADP, but as you can see even between us three there is massive variance. The bottom line is if you are using RotoBaller rankings, Mondesi is going to be scooped up well before even our earliest expert ranking, Nick at 86 overall. In that case, let someone else take the risk.

The last second baseman that I feel comfortable having as a starter in my points league lineups is Cesar Hernandez, and I've already pulled the trigger on him in several leagues this off-season. This Phillies lineup is going to be pretty lethal in 2019, and Cesar is going to be at the top of it behind Jean Segura, Andrew McCutchen, and Rhys Hoskins. He scored 91 R last year and hit 15 HR while stealing 19 bases. He also set a career-high walk-rate. The switch hitter is trending up, the Phillies are trending up, and expecting anything less than 100 R this year would be ill-advised.

Tier Five

We've reached the point of concern at the position, but this tier has some big-name guys that will be plenty useful as MIF or depth in points leagues. The first duo is Dee Gordon and Rougned Odor. It doesn't take a rocket surgeon (or brain scientist) to understand why Dee Gordon's value takes such a hit in points leagues, as his 1.5 BB% was the lowest in all of baseball. Even if he doubled that, it would still be the lowest. Pair that with his SB total being cut in half from 2017 and there's not much to like for 2019 outside of roto leagues. But he did play a large portion of last year injured, so expect the SB numbers to jump back up near the half-century mark. Odor actually took a huge step forward with his plate discipline last year, doubling his BB% from 2017, and adding 50 points to his BA. The strikeouts are still an issue and will cap his upside, but playing a full season in the two or three hole with 30/15 potential makes him a very intriguing MIF choice in 2019.

The bad news for DJ LeMahieu is he is no longer playing in Coors Field. The good news is he is now playing at Yankee Stadium in one of the most dangerous lineups in baseball. He hit a career-high 15 HR last year and has struck out less than 100 times in three straight seasons. If he can revert back to his pre-2018 heavy-oppo line drive profile, that short RF porch would ensure the power stays in the double digits. The main concern here is the unknown playing time and spot in the lineup. Steamer projects LeMahieu at 455 AB (I'll take the over), and I would assume the majority of those come from the bottom third of the lineup. He makes for a good bench bat and when, not if, Troy Tulowitzki gets hurt you can put him in your lineup until Didi Gregorius is back.

If Jonathan Villar was the starting second baseman for the Brewers, this would be a much different blurb. But alas, the Brew Crew messed that up and we're looking at one of the few fantasy-relevant players on the Orioles for 2019. 15/30 talent and shortstop eligibility makes him a useful bench bat to cover injuries and off-days, but 150+ Ks and a minimally productive offense banishes Villar from starting lineups in points leagues.

 

Second Base Points League Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Six

The next super-utility, useful bench-fantasy hitter is a personal favorite, Joey Wendle. Wendle enjoyed his first full season in the MLB, hitting .300 with 16 SB, while qualifying at 2B, 3B, SS, and OF. The BA won't carry over, as his .353 BABIP is certainly headed for regression. But the Rays have made some upgrades to their lineup and in 2019 Wendle could very well be hitting out of the three hole behind Tommy Pham, and in front of Austin Meadows. It's a sneaky good situation for a sneaky good fantasy hitter. The mid-teen SB is almost a guarantee as he has stolen at least 10 every season since 2013, and that speed mixed with his ultra position-eligibility makes him a great value pick in the later rounds.

The two biggest names in the sixth tier are easily Jonathan Schoop and Yoan Moncada. Schoop is just one year removed from hitting 32 bombs and 105 RBI with the Orioles and joined a revamped Twins team this off-season. But coming off a season where his already putrid 0.25 BB/K ratio dropped to 0.17 and saw his HR total dip down to the low 20's, you might want to take a wait-and-see approach with him this year to see if 2017 was an outlier or if 2018 was just an unlucky season. Moncada has all the potential in the world and finally played a full season with the White Sox last year. The end result was 17 HR and 12 SB, with a .235 BA. Unfortunately, the plate discipline is still awful, as his 33.4 K% was only beat by Chris Davis and Joey Gallo. He is destined for 200+ K again and will take much more development until he can be trusted in points leagues.

Disclaimer, I am a Garrett Hampson truther for 2019, and you can tell by my ranking compared to Nick and Bill. Sure the Daniel Murphy signing and looming presence of Brendan Rodgers makes Hampson's outlook much murkier. But as of now, he should be the starting second baseman for the Rox, and as long as that remains a fact, I am on board. First off, the guy can fly. He stole 51 bases in A+ ball in 2017 and combined for 38 SB across two minor league levels and a short MLB stint last year. Secondly, he is an on-base machine. Hampson owned an OBP higher than .377 at all three stops last year, including boasting a 14.6 BB% across 24 games with the big league team. I have him as my MIF in a few leagues already this off-season, and I don't expect that trend to change anytime soon, even in points leagues.

I was not happy when the Mets signed Jed Lowrie, as it essentially blocked Jeff McNeil and Peter Alonso from a shot at serious playing time in 2019. But it bodes well for Lowrie, who is coming off his best season after setting career-highs with 23 HR and 99 RBI. There is nothing exciting about him, but hitting in the top half of the lineup with Brandon Nimmo, Robinson Cano, and Michael Conforto with above-average on-base skills makes Lowrie a sneaky value pick for your MIF slot. Like Hampson, I am higher on Lowrie than my colleagues, but I am willing to plant my flag on both of these hills.

Luis Urias is a guy I have been scooping up in the late rounds solely because of intrigue. The ceiling isn't anything crazy, but he should get a crack at hitting near the top of the lineup and posted the exact same .296 BA and .398 OBP at AA and AAA last season. Maybe we get lucky and the power develops out of nowhere, he is still just 21 years old. There's really no risk to snag him for your bench late in the draft.

Tier Seven

Naw, I'm good.

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2020 Fantasy Baseball Advice 2020 Fantasy Baseball Projections & ADP Analysis Editor Note Featured Baseball MLB Analysis RotoBaller - All Fantasy Sports Articles

First Base - Early Points League Rankings and Tiers

It’s never too early to start looking toward the fantasy baseball season, so I’m here to kick off RotoBaller’s position-by-position rankings analysis series for points league and head-to-head (H2H) formats with the hard-hitting first base position. Traditionally a power haven, first base has a fairly clear top three tiers and then the floor starts to get frightful. It is recommended that you buy-in early or have several depth options ready to go.

Our mixed-league points staff rankings come straight from the minds of myself, JB Branson and Bill Dubiel (a.k.a. the fourth-most accurate MLB expert for 2017 on FantasyPros), and we’ve got them broken down into tiers for both the sake of digestible content and because your rankings should always be tiered. For this exercise, hitters get a bump for total bases, walks and take a hit for strikeouts.

Keep an eye out for all other positions to follow! In the meantime, you can also see all of our preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball rankings for mixed leagues here. Bookmark that page and come back for updates throughout the coming months as you prepare to dominate on draft day. Without any more delay, let's take a look at the 2019 first base points league rankings for January.

 

2019 Fantasy Baseball Points League Rankings: First Base

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Paul Goldschmidt 1B 16 16 15
2 1 Freddie Freeman 1B 20 22 21
3 1 Anthony Rizzo 1B 25 23 26
4 2 Joey Votto 1B 38 30 23
5 2 Matt Carpenter 1B/2B/3B 41 39 39
6 2 Rhys Hoskins 1B/OF 42 40 40
7 2 Cody Bellinger 1B/OF 47 43 48
8 3 Edwin Encarnacion 1B 67 61 67
9 3 Daniel Murphy 1B/2B 71 78 72
10 3 Robinson Cano 1B/2B 79 77 82
11 3 Jesus Aguilar 1B 95 89 90
12 3 Travis Shaw 1B/2B/3B 96 94 97
13 3 Jose Abreu 1B 97 101 98
14 3 Carlos Santana 1B/3B 103 97 105
15 4 Matt Olson 1B 114 112 111
16 4 J.T. Realmuto C/1B 105 130 114
17 4 Max Muncy 1B/2B/3B 102 102 151
18 4 Ryan Braun 1B/OF 130 119 132
19 4 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 141 118 126
20 4 Eric Hosmer 1B 140 125 148
21 4 Buster Posey C/1B 143 138 153
22 4 Miguel Cabrera 1B 129 150 155
23 4 Jose Martinez OF/1B 149 151 141
24 5 Joey Gallo 3B/1B/OF 151 175 158
25 5 Ian Desmond OF/1B 179 172 144
26 5 Justin Smoak 1B 164 163 169
27 5 Yulieski Gurriel 1B/2B/3B 184 166 172
28 5 Miguel Sano 1B/3B 165 184 179
29 5 Luke Voit 1B 150 206 174
30 6 C.J. Cron 1B 224 224 220
31 6 Brandon Belt 1B/OF 221 240 218
32 6 Trey Mancini 1B/OF 232 221 230
33 6 Ryan Zimmerman 1B 237 233 238
34 6 Tyler White 1B 217 276 229
35 6 Josh Bell 1B 242 241 242
36 6 Peter Alonso 1B 261 263 236
37 6 Jake Bauers 1B/OF 283 269 279
38 6 Justin Bour 1B 300 271 290
39 6 Yonder Alonso 1B 295 279 295
40 6 Ryon Healy 1B 319 290 270
41 6 Albert Pujols 1B 313 285 284
42 6 Kendrys Morales 1B 297 289 297
43 7 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 320 306 316
44 7 Adam Duvall 1B/OF 322 312 317
45 7 Ryan O'Hearn 1B 317 339 314
46 7 Jay Bruce OF/1B 331 332 #N/A
47 7 Mitch Moreland 1B 341 354 340
48 7 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 370 359 350
49 7 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 381 365 346
50 7 Ehire Adrianza SS/1B/3B 406 372 342
51 7 Ryan McMahon 1B/3B/2B 375 373 #N/A
52 7 Tyler Austin 1B 390 366 367
53 7 Eric Thames 1B/OF 400 376 372
54 7 Chris Davis 1B 388 429 #N/A
55 7 Ronald Guzman 1B 407 412 #N/A
56 7 Colin Moran 3B/1B 433 408 394
57 7 Tucker Barnhart C/1B 430 440 #N/A
58 7 Greg Bird 1B 444 430 #N/A
59 7 Rowdy Tellez 1B 456 444 #N/A
60 7 Jedd Gyorko 1B/3B 470 463 #N/A
61 7 Dan Vogelbach 1B 495 #N/A #N/A
62 7 Jose Osuna 1B/OF 499 #N/A #N/A

 

First Base Points League Rankings: Upper Tiers

Tier One

While Paul Goldschmidt burned fantasy owners in April and May last season, he tore the cover off of the ball over the final two-thirds of the fantasy season to end up with a Goldschmidt-ian line. The only thing that didn’t return was his speed, as it was revealed that the D-backs weren’t running him in order to preserve him. If that carries over then he’s no longer a first-round lock, especially in points formats where pitchers get a bump. That said, he’s got a great eye and St. Louis should provide a chance at 200 R+RBI for his troubles.

Freddie Freeman and Anthony Rizzo are at their peak ages right now and find themselves surrounded by great lineups. There’s little to dissect here, as you should be thrilled with either of these guys as your first or second hitter, pending a pitcher being your first-round selection. Even though Rizzo posted a .187 ISO after living in the .234-.252 range for four straight seasons, his batted-ball profile is largely unchanged so I’d expect the 13.6% HR/FB rate to creep back toward his respective 16.2% and 16.9% marks from 2016 and ‘17 here.

Tier Two

I understand the desire to look at 35-year-old Joey Votto’s sharp decline in OPS (1.032 in 2017, .837 in ‘18) and decide the plate discipline isn’t worth the third-round trigger. As you can see, I have him 38th compared to Bill’s optimistic ranking of 23rd while JB splits the difference at 30. If you believe the cerebral slugger can return to his 30-homer form as Cincinnati infuses Yasiel Puig, Matt Kemp and (soon) Nick Senzel into the lineup around him then I think you have to pounce. He should remain the team’s three-hole hitter and his 17.3% walk rate outpaced the 16.2% strikeout rate. One thing is for sure, even the biggest hater has to expect positive regression for that 9.5% HR/FB rate that somehow occurred despite a career-high 41% hard-hit rate against his career 18.3% HR/FB mark.

Matt Carpenter, Rhys Hoskins and Cody Bellinger offer three exciting options before you start to wade into players with worrisome floors, as each of these players supplies myriad reasons to get excited. Carpenter’s midseason surge was no fluke, as his ridiculous 49% hard-hit rate was nearly 40 percentage points higher than his soft-contact rate -- a feat few can boast. Hoskins’ first full season saw him belt 34 homers with 187 R+RBI with a 13.2% walk rate despite his being stuck in the outfield. Now at first and playing with Jean Segura and Andrew McCutchen, he could explode. Bellinger also put up a double-digit walk rate (10.9%), but a slight dip in exit velocity cut his HR/FB rate by 10 percentage points from his wild rookie campaign. That said, he’s just 23 years old and a returning Corey Seager plus A.J. Pollock will keep the top of that lineup in formidable run-scoring shape.

 

First Base Points League Rankings: Middle Tiers

Tier Three

Here’s where you’ll get starting-caliber talent, but the question marks enter your mind. Can Edwin Encarnacion age gracefully? Will Daniel Murphy stay healthy? Could Robinson Cano produce at Citi Field? Was Jesus Aguilar’s breakout for real? Can Travis Shaw recapture his 2016 batting average? Will Jose Abreu rebound as the next generation of White Sox grow around him? And might Carlos Santana recover some of the 30 batting average points he lost in ‘18? Find out next time, on Dragon Baseball Z!

Seriously, though, you’re sweating a little with each of these bats. I’m not worried about age-36 E5 yet since he managed to top 100 RBI even with a DL stint and a lingering injury, but the odds of nagging issues increase as the body ages and we don’t want to be holding the bag when the next Jose Bautista crumbles. I’m confident in Murph and Cano posting solid returns at cost, and both Brewers are welcome on my team as well. I don't love Santana but he's consistently underrated due to lack of flash and the wide gap between his points league utility and traditional fantasy buzz. The plate discipline hasn't gone anywhere and swinging a left-handed stick in Cleveland is an automatic green light in DFS. It doesn't take much imagination, as Cleveland is exactly where Santana hit. 259 in 2016 and '17 before his Philadelphia adventure.

Tier Four

Let’s get this out of the way: You’re not drafting J.T. Realmuto or Buster Posey to play at first base. They’re eligible, sure, but don’t do it. I’ll let the catchers article chat about them.

Matt Olson, Max Muncy and Jose Martinez are all powerful guys whose bats demand playing time. Olson and Muncy are better fielders than JoMart, who will need to produce or risk losing playing time due to his subpar glove. Olson is a nice value and those in auction leagues can probably get a discount thanks to a disappointing .788 OPS after he topped 1.000 in his brief 2016 showing. His hard-hit rate jumped seven percentage points to 47.4% yet his HR/FB rate predictably regressed from 41.4%, but it went too far, dropping all the way to 16.1%, with his true potential lying closer to 25% methinks.

The biggest question here is Miguel Cabrera. You can see I’m in more than my colleagues, who are baking in post-surgery risk for a guy that turns 36 in April a little more than me. The tenth round is exactly where I’m willing to take a risk, and I’ve already waited this long for a 1B so I at least need Miggy’s top-50 upside. Even with the diminished lift, he put up a .299/.395/.448 line over 157 PAs last season with a 14% walk rate. The 83.6% zone-contact rate was his worst mark since 2004 and the 20.4% fly-ball rate was over 10 percentage points lower than any other year, but I’m okay chalking that up to his biceps.

Tier Five

Will Joey Gallo draw three walks and hit a 480-foot moonshot, or will he don a platinum sombrero and torpedo your day? It’ll be the latter more often than not, but the back-to-back 40-homer campaigns covered up some interesting slips in his sophomore year. His walk rate went from 14.1% to 12.8% with a slight increase in his chase rate, which could just be noise but is worth noting. The real trouble is in his fly-ball rate, which fells 4.6 percentage points. He needs fly balls to provide his one valuable asset. He also went 3-of-7 on steal attempts in ‘18 after going 7-of-9 in ‘17, which doesn’t bode well for the green light moving forward.

Those seeking a bounce back story can try to snag Miguel Sano late, as he's another high-walk rate and big power guy, but you're eating a 35% strikeout rate no matter what. If he doesn't rebound from his disastrous .199 batting average last year then that K rate is going to burn you immediately. And you can also get a piece of the potent Yankees lineup that is coming off of its historic HR-hitting pace in Luke Voit, though he needs to hold off Greg Bird and a deep infield that could push Miguel Andujar or DJ LeMahieu to first base at times, especially once Didi Gregorius returns. But Voit's upside made itself known down the stretch in 2018, with a wild 15 homers and 1.067 OPS over 47 games in pinstripes, so I'm all for taking a shot there.

 

First Base Points League Rankings: Lower Tiers

Tier Six

These make for murky waters, but you can still find hitters capable of hot stretches that you’ll want to start, or at least showing a few skills that point to a potential breakout. Belt has only topped 600 PAs once in his career and hasn’t reached 500 since 2016, but posts walk rates above 10% and is one year removed from a .228 ISO.

If you’re in a 14-team league and need a CI then I’d want Tyler White or Josh Bell for their upside. White and Yuli Gurriel should be a nice 1B/DH combo in a star-studded Houston lineup. Meanwhile, Bell’s power slipped in 2018 from his 26-homer 2017, as he popped just 12 homers in his age-25 season with a HR/FB rate that more than halved despite improvements in his soft- and hard-hit rates, line-drive rate and fly-ball rate. He upped his walk rate from 10.6% to 13.2% in the process and I won’t be surprised by an OPS above .800.

Tier Seven

Time for some Hail Mary action! You’re here to find reliable playing time, or at least a platoonable bat to lean on four times a week. Ryan O’Hearn has power, but the strikeouts and KC run totals are going to burn you. Marwin Gonzalez has yet to find a home and may not hold down a full-time starting role where he ends up, not to mention his production slip in ‘18. Niko Goodrum is eligible nearly everywhere but is better in rotisserie leagues. Ryan McMahon is a victim of Rockies GM Jeff Bridich’s legendary mismanagement of young bats. Ronald Guzman holds some intrigue in hitter-friendly Arlington, but the power isn’t actionable yet.

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2020 Fantasy Baseball Advice 2020 Fantasy Baseball Draft Strategy & Tips Editor Note Featured Baseball #2 MLB Analysis RotoBaller - All Fantasy Sports Articles

2019 Points League Draft Strategy - Fantasy Baseball

When discussing fantasy baseball. An often neglected-but-entertaining format is the points league. These exist in both cumulative season-long and weekly head-to-head formats.

While existential debates about scoring categories and their true depiction of player worth are endless, points leagues arguably get closest to the objective of sabermetrics. Points leagues attempt to define a player’s contribution (or detraction) in greater depth. For example, we know a triple is more valuable than a single, and these leagues acknowledge that.

Fundamentals are the same, but there are some unique strategies associated with points leagues. We want to ensure you’re acquainted with these aspects before your draft. On behalf of RotoBaller, here is the fantasy baseball 2019 Points League Primer.

 

How to Win Your Points League

There is a high degree of overlap with standard leagues, but the below table illustrates an overview of this scoring system. We’ll discuss four primary difference that could alter a manager’s strategy on draft day and during the season.

Note scoring weights and categories differ by league. Some leagues overweight wins or underemphasize saves. Others might have additional categories like quality starts or HRs allowed. Since this is a basic outline, we’ll operate under our assumptions, but remember to check the settings of your particular league.

 

1) Strikeouts and Walks Matter

Hitting-wise, in common leagues, strikeouts are a non-event and hitters only receive indirect credit for a walk if he tallies an RBI or eventually scores. Points leagues instantly gratify hitters for getting on base, the essence of offense. Likewise, since a hitter is wholly responsible for striking out, he is punished.

A key metric in points leagues is BB/K. Out of 140 qualified hitters in 2018, the median BB/K was 0.45. Jose Ramirez was an elite outlier at 1.33, and the poorest was Dee Gordon at 0.11. Even though Aaron Hicks struck out at a 19.1% clip last season, his 15.5% walk rate gave him the 10th-best 0.81 BB/K. Same story with Matt Carpenter. The 23.3% K-rate appears high, but considering his walk tendencies (15.1%), a 0.65 BB/K becomes much more palatable. On the flipside, Javier Baez was a revelation in standard leagues last year. But despite the breakout season, he suffered massive value destruction in points leagues with 167 strikeouts and just 37 walks. Standard league players will accept Baez’s weak on-base abilities as long as he cranks 34 homers again, but the trade-off isn’t as attractive when strikeouts are explicitly taxed.

Earning walks skews a player’s value positively. Carlos Santana, Joey Votto, and Andrew McCutchen were walk-friendly players that saw a spike in their points league value despite relatively disappointing seasons. By targeting a BB/K around 0.5, owners should enjoy a positive benefit from drafting patient hitters.

Since there is a positive relationship between strikeouts and slugging, managers should also analyze the strikeout in exchange for amassing points via power.

 

2) Slugging is More Important than Average

An important consideration in points leagues is a player’s slugging ability. Instead of treating all hits equally as AVG does, netting points for total bases rewards hitting for power.

Mookie Betts hit 47 doubles and five triples in 2018. These contributions went ignored in standard leagues. Because of his high average and HR production, Betts’ value in points leagues was comparable to his rank in standard ones. Meanwhile, Xander Bogaerts (48 doubles+triples), Freddie Freeman (48) and Anthony Rendon (46) were all more relevant from a total bases standpoint. Even replacement-level guys like Marcus Semien and Yolmer Sanchez received bumps in relevance from their non-HR slugging.

Incorporating walks, slugging and BB/K complements AVG and HR, painting a better picture of a player’s true worth. Since wOBA isn’t a fantasy stat (yet), points leagues get us close to that representation.

 

3) Pitching Stamina Helps, Losses Hurt

Pitcher durability is a key ingredient to strikeouts, ERA and WHIP. More innings pitched means increased chances to rack up Ks and achieve a steady state in ratios. In points leagues, rate stats are converted into counting stats by penalizing earned runs and walks. Pitchers also receive points for each inning recorded. It’s vital to consider IP alongside standard measurements like K/9, especially when innings limits are concerned

The theme rings true for Jose Berrios and Rick Porcello, whose strikeout prowess and ability to pile on innings offset frustrating ratios. Despite a disappointing 3.74 ERA, 1.31 WHIP and pedestrian K/9 for Dallas Keuchel in 2018, his seventh-best 204 2/3 IP buoyed his value in points leagues. While Kyle Gibson and Reynaldo Lopez won’t dominate fantasy headlines, their durability made them relatively more valuable in points leagues. Even James Shields with his ugly 4.53 ERA held some worth simply due to his 204 2/3 IP.

Losses are also significantly detrimental. In standard leagues, you either win or you don’t. In points leagues, a pitcher’s outcome is critical even while evaluating his individual ability. Players like Tanner Roark and Cole Hamels suffered from losses despite serviceable seasons last year. Getting tagged with losses can negate otherwise strong starts by pitchers and is a much more meaningful swing factor than just wins.

 

4) Scoring is Category-Agnostic

Fantasy managers are trained to draft a balanced team to address our 5x5 needs. In points leagues, that is irrelevant. A double is worth as much as a steal, and six strikeouts count the same as a home run. Buck the traditional mentality, take stats where you can find them.

Points leagues have the unique characteristic of allowing managers to evaluate players on their overall body of work as opposed to select niche areas. A simple comparison covers doubles and stolen bases. In 2018, there were 8,264 doubles hit and 2,474 steals in the majors. In standard leagues, owners are fighting for share in a stolen base commodity that is getting scarcer. In points leagues, the argument is to just ignore steals and accumulate stats where there is excess supply like doubles and homers. There’s no harm in rostering a squad of sloths.

 

Conclusion

Points leagues show considerable overlap with standard leagues. It’s still just baseball. But, they better-represent the evolving appreciation of advanced statistics. It creates depth in a player’s profile (i.e. walks, triples, innings pitched) and more closely embodies the real value of that player on the diamond. Customization is another perk of points leagues. Categories and their corresponding weights are discretionary, so it gives leagues more flexibility in determining which stats they value.

In our experience, points leagues are more challenging and require extra strategy, but hopefully, that’s why we all play the game in the first place!

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2020 Fantasy Baseball Advice 2020 Fantasy Baseball Projections & ADP Analysis Editor Note Featured Baseball MLB Analysis RotoBaller - All Fantasy Sports Articles

Top 420: Points Leagues Tiered Staff Rankings (January)

Welcome back RotoBallers. Today we are here to start looking at points leagues and head-to-head (H2H) formats. In this column, you will find our staff's preliminary 2019 fantasy baseball points league rankings for January and the top 420 players. Over the next few days, we will also be publishing individual tiered rankings analysis columns for each position. Stay tuned.

Three of our lead fantasy baseball analysts - Nick Mariano, JB Branson and Bill Dubiel - have analyzed the MLB offseason moves and are ready to rock. Below you will find their consensus staff ranks for 2019, which will be updated regularly up until opening day. Feel free to click those links and give these fine gentlemen a follow, or let them know how much you love or hate their rankings.

In case you haven't noticed, we've already been cranking out all sorts of 2019 fantasy baseball rankings at RotoBaller HQ including a positional breakdown with tiered analysis for 5x5 mixed leagues. It's only January, but you can already find preliminary staff rankings for mixed leagues, points leagues, AL/NL only leagues, dynasty leagues, top 2019 prospects, dynasty prospects and more.

 

Top 420 Rankings: Points Leagues (January)

These staff rankings are as of January 21st, 2019. They are for head-to-head points leagues, and will be updated regularly through Opening Day.

Typically, points leagues have different league settings and scoring formats than most. Different stats and categories are assigned different point values, and that can vary by individual league settings. These different point buckets are then added up over the course of a scoring period or season.

In many cases, hitters who walk more and strikeout less are preferred for points leagues. Also, many league formats tend to give more weight to pitchers than normal as they can easily accrue points through categories like Innings Pitched. These are the general frameworks that we use for our ranks below.

You can also read more about typical points league scoring settings and draft strategies.

Rank Tier Player Name Position Nick JB Bill
1 1 Mike Trout OF 1 3 1
2 1 Jose Ramirez 2B/3B 2 1 3
3 1 Max Scherzer SP 3 2 4
4 1 Mookie Betts OF 4 4 2
5 1 Chris Sale SP 5 5 8
6 1 Jacob deGrom SP 6 7 5
7 1 Francisco Lindor SS 7 6 6
8 1 Nolan Arenado 3B 8 8 7
9 1 Alex Bregman 3B/SS 10 9 10
10 2 Justin Verlander SP 9 11 13
11 2 Corey Kluber SP 11 15 9
12 2 J.D. Martinez OF 12 14 11
13 2 Manny Machado 3B/SS 13 12 17
14 2 Christian Yelich OF 15 13 14
15 2 Aaron Nola SP 14 10 18
16 2 Paul Goldschmidt 1B 16 16 15
17 2 Jose Altuve 2B 18 18 12
18 2 Bryce Harper OF 17 17 19
19 2 Gerrit Cole SP 19 19 22
20 2 Freddie Freeman 1B 20 22 21
21 2 Ronald Acuna OF 21 27 16
22 2 Blake Snell SP 23 20 24
23 2 Anthony Rizzo 1B 25 21 26
24 2 Clayton Kershaw SP 24 23 25
25 3 Trevor Story SS 22 26 30
26 3 Trea Turner SS 28 25 28
27 3 Carlos Carrasco SP 27 28 27
28 3 Aaron Judge OF 32 31 20
29 3 Charlie Blackmon OF 29 29 29
30 3 Andrew Benintendi OF 30 30 31
31 3 Juan Soto OF 26 24 41
32 3 Kris Bryant 3B/OF 31 35 32
33 3 Luis Severino SP 33 32 33
34 3 Joey Votto 1B 38 38 23
35 4 Trevor Bauer SP 34 33 34
36 4 Anthony Rendon 3B 35 34 36
37 4 Giancarlo Stanton OF 37 39 37
38 4 Patrick Corbin SP 36 36 45
39 4 Rhys Hoskins 1B/OF 42 40 40
40 4 James Paxton SP 43 42 38
41 4 Zack Greinke SP 39 37 47
42 4 Matt Carpenter 1B/2B/3B 41 43 39
43 4 Walker Buehler SP 40 41 43
44 4 Edwin Diaz RP 44 44 42
45 4 George Springer OF 51 51 35
46 4 Cody Bellinger 1B/OF 47 45 48
47 4 Noah Syndergaard SP 45 53 44
48 4 Stephen Strasburg SP 46 52 46
49 4 Xander Bogaerts SS 49 47 49
50 5 German Marquez SP 52 48 51
51 5 Javier Baez 2B/SS/3B 50 55 50
52 5 Whit Merrifield 2B/OF 54 50 53
53 5 Jack Flaherty SP 55 49 54
54 5 Michael Clevinger SP 48 46 68
55 5 Carlos Correa SS 57 54 56
56 5 Starling Marte OF 53 65 52
57 5 Jameson Taillon SP 59 56 58
58 5 David Price SP 58 60 57
59 5 Eugenio Suarez 3B 60 57 61
60 5 Khris Davis OF 56 68 55
61 5 Blake Treinen RP 62 62 62
62 5 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 3B 64 59 65
63 6 Lorenzo Cain OF 63 63 64
64 6 Justin Turner 3B 65 66 60
65 6 Edwin Encarnacion 1B 67 58 67
66 6 Craig Kimbrel RP 66 69 66
67 6 Miles Mikolas SP 61 64 80
68 6 Nelson Cruz DH 68 61 77
69 6 Kenley Jansen RP 70 71 70
70 6 Corey Seager SS 73 67 74
71 6 Jose Berrios SP 82 73 59
72 6 Michael Brantley OF 76 70 71
73 6 Jean Segura SS 72 74 73
74 6 Zack Wheeler SP 69 81 69
75 6 Scooter Gennett 2B 80 80 63
76 6 Josh Donaldson 3B 78 75 75
77 6 Ozzie Albies 2B 77 72 81
78 6 Eddie Rosario OF 74 83 78
79 7 Robinson Cano 1B/2B 79 76 82
80 7 Daniel Murphy 1B/2B 71 95 72
81 7 Michael Foltynewicz SP 81 78 83
82 7 Miguel Andujar 3B 84 77 86
83 7 Brad Hand RP 83 79 85
84 7 Mitch Haniger OF 75 90 91
85 7 Aroldis Chapman RP 87 82 88
86 7 David Peralta OF 93 86 84
87 7 Nick Castellanos OF 88 87 89
88 7 Charlie Morton SP 89 85 92
89 7 A.J. Pollock OF 99 92 76
90 7 Aaron Hicks OF 85 97 87
91 7 Jesus Aguilar 1B 95 89 90
92 7 Tommy Pham OF 92 88 96
93 8 Jose Peraza 2B/SS 90 93 93
94 8 Justin Upton OF 91 98 94
95 8 Travis Shaw 1B/2B/3B 96 94 97
96 8 Madison Bumgarner SP 103 84 104
97 8 J.A. Happ SP 94 105 95
98 8 Jose Abreu 1B 97 102 98
99 8 Carlos Santana 1B/3B 104 91 105
100 8 Rick Porcello SP 98 103 99
101 8 Felipe Vázquez RP 106 101 101
102 8 Kyle Hendricks SP 101 106 103
103 8 Masahiro Tanaka SP 100 111 100
104 8 Andrew McCutchen OF 105 100 107
105 8 Marcell Ozuna OF 107 99 108
106 8 Brian Dozier 2B 108 104 110
107 8 Gleyber Torres 2B/SS 111 112 102
108 9 Ender Inciarte OF 112 110 106
109 9 Nick Markakis OF 109 107 112
110 9 Matt Olson 1B 113 113 111
111 9 Chris Archer SP 117 108 116
112 9 Max Muncy 1B/2B/3B 102 96 151
113 9 Gregory Polanco OF 119 109 121
114 9 Jesse Winker OF 114 123 113
115 9 Yasiel Puig OF 118 117 120
116 9 Andrelton Simmons SS 120 114 122
117 9 Shohei Ohtani DH 130 118 109
118 9 Kyle Freeland SP 116 126 115
119 9 Gary Sanchez C 121 115 123
120 9 Mike Moustakas 3B 123 116 125
121 9 Sean Doolittle RP 110 128 127
122 9 Jurickson Profar SS/3B/1B/2B 124 119 126
123 9 J.T. Realmuto C/1B 115 141 114
124 9 Josh Hader RP 125 134 117
125 9 Ryan Braun 1B/OF 129 121 132
126 9 Kirby Yates RP 126 127 129
127 9 Luis Castillo SP 127 131 130
128 9 Michael Conforto OF 128 132 131
129 9 Elvis Andrus SS 131 129 135
130 9 Andrew Heaney SP 134 125 139
131 10 David Dahl OF 122 154 124
132 10 Corey Knebel RP 139 120 147
133 10 Adalberto Mondesi 2B/SS 86 130 194
134 10 Eric Hosmer 1B 141 122 148
135 10 Cesar Hernandez 2B 136 135 142
136 10 Roberto Osuna RP 132 146 136
137 10 Raisel Iglesias RP 135 140 140
138 10 Brandon Nimmo OF 162 174 79
139 10 Wil Myers 3B/OF 137 136 143
140 10 Nick Pivetta SP 138 144 134
141 10 Matt Chapman 3B 144 148 137
142 10 Eloy Jimenez OF 142 137 152
143 10 Jonathan Gray SP 151 162 118
144 10 Buster Posey C/1B 143 139 153
145 10 Dee Gordon 2B/OF 145 138 154
146 10 Carlos Martinez SP 157 163 119
147 10 Miguel Cabrera 1B 133 153 155
148 10 Victor Robles OF 146 143 156
149 10 Dallas Keuchel SP 149 151 146
150 10 Jose Martinez OF/1B 150 155 141
151 10 Wade Davis RP 147 142 157
152 10 Kyle Schwarber OF 159 157 138
153 10 Jonathan Villar 2B/SS 148 150 160
154 10 Cole Hamels SP 154 160 145
155 11 Seranthony Dominguez RP 170 149 150
156 11 Shin-Soo Choo OF 153 156 162
157 11 Stephen Piscotty OF 152 159 161
158 11 Andrew Miller RP 155 #N/A 163
159 11 Robbie Ray SP 156 158 164
160 11 Harrison Bader OF 169 182 128
161 11 Will Smith RP 161 161 166
162 11 Rich Hill SP 160 165 165
163 11 Mallex Smith OF 165 164 168
164 11 Ian Desmond OF/1B 179 175 144
165 11 Joey Gallo 3B/1B/OF 163 178 158
166 11 Jose Leclerc RP 164 168 167
167 11 Justin Smoak 1B 166 166 169
168 11 Yadier Molina C 168 167 170
169 11 Yulieski Gurriel 1B/2B/3B 171 169 172
170 11 Rougned Odor 2B 180 177 159
171 11 Marcus Semien SS 172 172 173
172 11 Wilson Ramos C 174 173 176
173 11 Tim Anderson SS 173 176 175
174 11 Rafael Devers 3B 177 170 180
175 11 Garrett Hampson 2B 191 147 192
176 11 Collin McHugh SP 176 #N/A 178
177 11 Miguel Sano 1B/3B 167 189 179
178 11 Nathan Eovaldi SP 175 188 177
179 11 Luke Voit 1B 140 226 174
180 11 Odubel Herrera OF 182 179 182
181 11 Jonathan Schoop 2B 192 184 171
182 11 Yasmani Grandal C 185 180 185
183 11 Eduardo Rodriguez SP 181 191 181
184 11 Yu Darvish SP 178 228 149
185 11 Alexander Colome RP 187 181 187
186 11 Zack Godley SP 188 183 188
187 11 Jeff McNeil 2B 214 133 214
188 11 Jed Lowrie 2B 205 152 205
189 11 Amed Rosario SS 189 186 189
190 11 David Robertson RP 184 200 184
191 12 Brandon Morrow RP 190 187 191
192 12 Kyle Gibson SP 193 198 193
193 12 Sean Newcomb SP 195 196 196
194 12 Marco Gonzales SP 194 202 195
195 12 Jose Quintana SP 196 199 197
196 12 Willson Contreras C 200 195 200
197 12 Ross Stripling SP 183 229 183
198 12 Eduardo Escobar SS/3B 199 197 199
199 12 Shane Bieber SP 186 223 186
200 12 Salvador Perez C 213 171 213
201 12 Chris Taylor 2B/SS/OF 198 192 208
202 12 Jon Lester SP 197 210 198
203 12 Yoan Moncada 2B 206 201 206
204 12 Brett Gardner OF 204 205 204
205 12 Maikel Franco 3B 211 214 190
206 12 Corey Dickerson OF 207 206 207
207 12 Josh James SP 202 193 226
208 12 Nomar Mazara OF 209 203 210
209 12 Dellin Betances RP 203 221 203
210 12 Paul DeJong SS 212 204 212
211 12 Kyle Seager 3B 210 209 211
212 12 Kyle Tucker OF 255 124 257
213 12 Mychal Givens RP 225 185 228
214 13 Alex Wood SP 216 222 202
215 13 Jake Arrieta SP 208 231 209
216 13 Hunter Renfroe OF 219 212 219
217 13 Matt Kemp OF 229 190 232
218 13 Jose Alvarado RP 228 194 231
219 13 Ketel Marte SS 222 213 222
220 13 Kenneth Giles RP 221 216 221
221 13 Drew Steckenrider RP 224 207 227
222 13 C.J. Cron 1B 220 219 220
223 13 Kenta Maeda SP 217 227 217
224 13 Trey Mancini 1B/OF 227 217 230
225 13 Brandon Belt 1B/OF 218 239 218
226 13 Ian Happ 3B/OF 233 224 224
227 13 Austin Meadows OF 231 218 234
228 13 Billy Hamilton OF 238 208 241
229 13 Peter Alonso 1B 232 220 236
230 13 Teoscar Hernandez OF 239 234 216
231 13 Adam Jones OF 243 225 225
232 13 Dereck Rodriguez SP 215 263 215
233 13 Randal Grichuk OF 234 230 237
234 13 Ryan Zimmerman 1B 235 233 238
235 13 Mike Minor SP 223 261 223
236 13 Tyler Glasnow SP 236 238 239
237 13 Luis Urias 2B 246 236 235
238 13 Archie Bradley RP 241 235 243
239 13 Michael Fulmer SP 230 257 233
240 14 Josh Bell 1B 240 244 242
241 14 Alexander Reyes SP/RP 237 251 240
242 14 Domingo Santana OF 242 #N/A 244
243 14 Tyler White 1B 226 280 229
244 14 Ramon Laureano OF 245 245 246
245 14 Tyler Skaggs SP 244 249 245
246 14 Max Kepler OF 253 232 255
247 14 Arodys Vizcaino RP 254 242 256
248 14 Jordan Hicks RP 261 248 247
249 14 Julio Teheran SP 250 240 267
250 14 Johan Camargo 2B/3B/SS 256 243 258
251 14 Carlos Rodon SP 252 254 254
252 14 Adam Eaton OF 258 247 260
253 14 Kevin Gausman SP 262 256 248
254 14 Kole Calhoun OF 260 246 262
255 14 Cody Allen RP 265 255 251
256 14 Jorge Polanco SS 251 253 268
257 14 Matt Boyd SP 247 266 263
258 14 Jake Junis SP 249 262 266
259 14 Trevor Williams SP 264 265 250
260 14 Joe Musgrove SP 257 264 259
261 14 Derek Holland SP 259 270 261
262 14 Brian Anderson 3B/OF 269 252 272
263 14 Franmil Reyes OF 263 281 249
264 14 A.J. Minter RP 274 260 264
265 14 Anibal Sanchez SP 267 #N/A 269
266 14 Jeremy Jeffress RP 273 259 275
267 14 Steven Matz SP 266 294 252
268 14 Jake Lamb 3B 281 250 283
269 15 CC Sabathia SP 270 #N/A 273
270 15 Manuel Margot OF 268 278 271
271 15 Starlin Castro 2B 290 241 287
272 15 Daniel Palka OF 291 237 294
273 15 Jake Bauers 1B/OF 277 267 279
274 15 Mike Soroka SP 279 268 281
275 15 Trevor Cahill SP 276 #N/A 278
276 15 Justin Bour 1B 285 258 290
277 15 Tanner Roark SP 280 271 282
278 15 Adam Ottavino RP 278 276 280
279 15 Chase Anderson SP 272 289 274
280 15 Jhoulys Chacin SP 275 285 277
281 15 Yusei Kikuchi SP 271 #N/A 289
282 15 Jason Kipnis 2B/OF 283 272 286
283 15 Scott Schebler OF 284 273 288
284 15 Cedric Mullins OF 287 269 292
285 15 Ryon Healy 1B 297 283 270
286 15 Joey Lucchesi SP 282 288 285
287 15 Albert Pujols 1B 294 279 284
288 15 Yonder Alonso 1B 292 275 295
289 15 Shane Greene RP 293 277 296
290 16 Reynaldo Lopez SP 288 286 293
291 16 Jeimer Candelario 3B 286 291 291
292 16 Kendrys Morales 1B 295 282 297
293 16 Ian Kinsler 2B 298 284 299
294 16 Yolmer Sanchez 2B/3B 299 290 300
295 16 Kevin Kiermaier OF 296 #N/A 298
296 16 Josh Reddick OF 300 293 301
297 16 Dylan Bundy SP 301 295 302
298 16 Nick Ahmed SS 302 296 303
299 16 Carlos Gonzalez OF 306 292 307
300 16 Didi Gregorius SS 312 287 313
301 16 Julio Urias SP 307 297 308
302 16 Seth Lugo SP/RP 304 #N/A 305
303 16 Kevin Pillar OF 308 298 309
304 16 Mike Fiers SP 305 #N/A 306
305 16 Trevor Richards SP 303 311 304
306 16 Touki Toussaint SP #N/A 308 #N/A
307 16 Byron Buxton OF 309 #N/A 310
308 16 Marwin Gonzalez 1B/2B/SS/OF 315 299 316
309 16 Matt Strahm RP 310 #N/A 311
310 16 Tyler Anderson SP 317 300 318
311 16 Ryan O'Hearn 1B 313 #N/A 314
312 16 Jake Cave OF 314 #N/A 315
313 16 Willie Calhoun OF 321 303 322
314 16 Adam Duvall 1B/OF 316 #N/A 317
315 16 Isiah Kiner-Falefa C/2B/3B 322 305 323
316 16 Brent Honeywell SP 319 312 320
317 16 Luiz Gohara SP #N/A 317 #N/A
318 16 Francisco Cervelli C 323 307 324
319 16 Jeurys Familia RP 324 306 325
320 17 Dinelson Lamet SP 318 #N/A 319
321 17 Jimmy Nelson SP 320 #N/A 321
322 17 Danny Jansen C 325 314 326
323 17 Sandy Alcantara SP 326 315 327
324 17 Jorge Alfaro C 336 310 335
325 17 Mike Leake SP 327 #N/A 328
326 17 Freddy Peralta SP 328 #N/A 329
327 17 Jordan Montgomery SP 329 #N/A #N/A
328 17 Francisco Mejia C 330 #N/A 330
329 17 Brandon Woodruff SP 331 #N/A #N/A
330 17 Willy Adames SS 333 #N/A 332
331 17 Yoenis Cespedes OF 334 #N/A 333
332 17 Ty Buttrey RP 335 #N/A 334
333 17 Bradley Zimmer OF 337 #N/A 336
334 17 Ivan Nova SP 338 #N/A 338
335 17 Chad Green RP 339 #N/A 339
336 17 Marcus Stroman SP 404 #N/A 276
337 17 Mitch Moreland 1B 340 #N/A 340
338 17 Yoshihisa Hirano RP 341 #N/A #N/A
339 17 Corbin Burnes SP/RP 342 #N/A 341
340 17 Franklin Barreto SS 348 318 363
341 17 Forrest Whitley SP 343 #N/A 358
342 17 Steve Pearce 1B/2B/OF 351 #N/A 350
343 17 Ehire Adrianza SS/1B/3B 359 #N/A 342
344 17 Scott Kingery SS/3B/OF 344 #N/A 359
345 17 Pablo Lopez SP 352 #N/A 351
346 17 Caleb Smith SP 360 #N/A 343
347 17 Raimel Tapia OF 345 #N/A 360
348 17 Austin Barnes C 353 #N/A 352
349 17 Josh Harrison 2B 361 #N/A 344
350 17 Lucas Giolito SP 362 #N/A 345
351 17 Danny Duffy SP 354 #N/A 353
352 17 Ryan Yarbrough SP 346 #N/A 361
353 17 Dansby Swanson SS 347 #N/A 362
354 17 Taijuan Walker SP 355 #N/A 354
355 17 Niko Goodrum 1B/2B/3B/SS/OF 363 #N/A 346
356 17 Clay Buchholz SP 356 #N/A 355
357 17 Troy Tulowitzki SS 365 #N/A 347
358 17 Brandon Crawford SS 349 #N/A 364
359 17 Brad Keller SP/RP 357 #N/A 356
360 17 Seung Hwan Oh RP 366 #N/A 348
361 17 Lewis Brinson OF 350 #N/A 365
362 17 Jake Odorizzi SP 358 #N/A 357
363 18 Felix Hernandez SP 367 #N/A 349
364 18 Willians Astudillo C 385 #N/A 337
365 18 Jason Vargas SP 364 #N/A #N/A
366 18 Jeff Samardzija SP 368 #N/A 366
367 18 Tyler Austin 1B 369 #N/A 367
368 18 Eduardo Nunez 2B/3B 370 #N/A 368
369 18 Joc Pederson OF 371 #N/A 369
370 18 Michael Wacha SP 372 #N/A 370
371 18 Lance Lynn SP 374 #N/A 371
372 18 Danny Salazar SP 373 #N/A #N/A
373 18 Eric Thames 1B/OF 375 #N/A 372
374 18 Jorge Soler OF 377 #N/A 373
375 18 Jose Urena SP 376 #N/A #N/A
376 18 Yandy Diaz 3B 379 #N/A 374
377 18 Albert Almora Jr. OF 380 #N/A 375
378 18 Steven Duggar OF 378 #N/A #N/A
379 18 Jason Heyward OF 381 #N/A 376
380 18 Aaron Altherr OF 382 #N/A 377
381 18 Zach Eflin SP 384 #N/A 378
382 18 Mikie Mahtook OF 386 #N/A 379
383 18 Ronald Guzman 1B 383 #N/A #N/A
384 18 Gio Gonzalez SP 387 #N/A 380
385 18 Felix Pena RP/SP 388 #N/A 381
386 18 Matt Harvey SP 389 #N/A 382
387 18 Wily Peralta SP/RP 390 #N/A 383
388 18 Joe Kelly RP 391 #N/A 385
389 18 Peter O'Brien OF 393 #N/A 387
390 18 Wade LeBlanc RP/SP 394 #N/A 388
391 18 Adam Wainwright SP 395 #N/A 389
392 18 Chris Stratton SP 398 #N/A 391
393 18 Matt Shoemaker SP 396 #N/A #N/A
394 18 Robert Gsellman SP/RP 400 #N/A 392
395 18 Chad Kuhl SP 397 #N/A #N/A
396 18 Anthony DeSclafani SP 401 #N/A 393
397 18 Colin Moran 3B/1B 402 #N/A 394
398 18 Brendan Rodgers SS 403 #N/A 395
399 18 Jorge Bonifacio OF 399 #N/A #N/A
400 18 Ryan Borucki SP 405 #N/A 396
401 18 Jeremy Hellickson SP 408 #N/A 397
402 18 Alex Verdugo OF 422 #N/A 384
403 18 Joe Ross SP 416 #N/A 390
404 18 Jung Ho Kang 3B 409 #N/A 398
405 18 Brock Holt 2B/3B/OF 411 #N/A 399
406 18 Mike Montgomery SP/RP 406 #N/A #N/A
407 18 Keston Hiura 2B 414 #N/A 400
408 18 Phillip Ervin OF 407 #N/A #N/A
409 18 Avisail Garcia OF 418 #N/A 401
410 18 Michael Pineda SP 410 #N/A #N/A
411 18 Dylan Covey SP 412 #N/A #N/A
412 18 Adam Frazier 2B 413 #N/A #N/A
413 18 Daniel Mengden SP 415 #N/A #N/A
414 18 Wei-Yin Chen SP 417 #N/A #N/A
415 18 Brandon Finnegan SP 419 #N/A #N/A
416 18 Dustin Fowler OF 420 #N/A #N/A
417 18 Marco Estrada SP 421 #N/A #N/A
418 18 Yonny Chirinos SP 423 #N/A #N/A
419 18 Greg Bird 1B 424 #N/A #N/A
420 18 Zach Davies SP 425 #N/A #N/A
421 18 Travis Jankowski OF 426 #N/A #N/A

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Start/Sit Matchups - Starting Pitchers (9/24 - 9/30)

Welcome back, RotoBallers. For those of you still playing - we're here to try and help with your  lineup decisions, and of course bring him those championship trophies! I'm filling in for the regular @Roto_Dubs this week, as he has "real life" stuff to attend to. For those who aren't familiar, this is our fifth year now writing this weekly column, helping fantasy baseball managers pick the best pitchers weekly.

Below are the projected starting pitching matchups for Week 26 (9/24 through 9/30) as they currently stand, and our recommendations on whether to start or sit each pitcher. We'll be updating these throughout the week as rotations are inevitably tweaked. If you've got any questions about which pitchers can capitalize on a juicy matchup and which ones might be worth putting on the pine against a fierce offense, this is the weekly piece for you.

For every week of the fantasy baseball season, we look to analyze all of the projected starting pitcher matchups and put together our optimal lineups. It's late enough in the season where we need to dig a little deeper -- those looking to make up ground in the standings may need to take some more risks to try and make up ground on their opponents. Those leading the pack need to make sure they don't roll out too many duds, so benching to right dud can be a ratio saver. And as we approach September, more pitchers will be emerging on the waiver wire, so stay stuned! Now let's get those optimal lineups set for the upcoming week!

 

SP Matchups & Start/Sit Recommendations

This weekly piece considers the pitcher’s opponents, their career stats against the opponent, some ballpark factors and historical splits. With all of this information, we then provide our start/sit recommendations for each starting pitcher matchup for the approaching week of fantasy baseball. As we near towards the end of the season, and many teams stream heavily, my start recommendations become more aggressive. Ya gotta be in it to win it.

Last updated: Saturday, September 29 at 6:00 pm ET

PROBABLE PITCHERS - MONDAY (9/24/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
BAL@BOS Dylan Bundy SP | BAL SIT Nathan Eovaldi SP | BOS START
CLE@CHW Corey Kluber SP | CLE START Dylan Covey SP | CHW SIT
HOU@TOR Dallas Keuchel SP | HOU START Marco Estrada SP | TOR SIT
LAD@ARI Clayton Kershaw SP | LAD START Robbie Ray SP | ARI START
MIA@WAS Sandy Alcantara RP | MIA SIT Stephen Strasburg SP | WAS START
MIL@STL Dan Jennings SP | MIL SIT Jack Flaherty SP | STL START
NYY@TB Jonathan Holder SP | NYY SIT Diego Castillo RP | TB SIT
OAK@SEA Daniel Mengden SP | OAK START James Paxton SP | SEA START
PHI@COL Zach Eflin SP | PHI SIT Jon Gray SP | COL START
PIT@CHC Jameson Taillon SP | PIT START Cole Hamels SP | CHC START
SD@SF Bryan Mitchell RP | SD SIT Derek Holland SP | SF START
TEX@LAA Adrian Sampson SP | TEX SIT Felix Pena RP | LAA SIT
PROBABLE PITCHERS - TUESDAY (9/25/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
ATL@NYM Touki Toussaint SP | ATL START Noah Syndergaard SP | NYM START
BAL@BOS TBD TBD David Price SP | BOS START
CLE@CHW Trevor Bauer SP | CLE START James Shields SP | CHW SIT
DET@MIN Spencer Turnbull SP | DET SIT Gabriel Moya SP | MIN SIT
HOU@TOR Josh James SP | HOU START Sam Gaviglio SP | TOR SIT
KC@CIN Eric Skoglund SP | KC SIT Matt Harvey SP | CIN SIT
LAD@ARI Walker Buehler RP | LAD START Matt Koch RP | ARI SIT
MIA@WAS Jeff Brigham RP | MIA SIT Max Scherzer SP | WAS START
MIL@STL Gio Gonzalez SP | MIL START Austin Gomber SP | STL START
NYY@TB Luis Severino SP | NYY START Jake Faria SP | TB SIT
OAK@SEA Brett Anderson SP | OAK SIT Mike Leake SP | SEA START
PHI@COL Vince Velasquez SP | PHI SIT Chad Bettis SP | COL SIT
PIT@CHC Chris Archer SP | PIT START Mike Montgomery RP | CHC START
SD@SF Robbie Erlin SP | SD SIT Chris Stratton SP | SF START
TEX@LAA Yovani Gallardo SP | TEX SIT Matt Shoemaker SP | LAA SIT
PROBABLE PITCHERS - WEDNESDAY (9/26/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
ATL@NYM Sean Newcomb SP | ATL START Jacob deGrom SP | NYM START
BAL@BOS Ryan Meisinger RP | BAL SIT David Price SP | BOS START
BAL@BOS Jimmy Yacabonis RP | BAL SIT Chris Sale SP | BOS START
CLE@CHW Shane Bieber SP | CLE START Jace Fry RP | CHW SIT
DET@MIN Matthew Boyd SP | DET START Jake Odorizzi SP | MIN START
HOU@TOR Chris Devenski RP | HOU START Sean Reid-Foley SP | TOR SIT
KC@CIN Heath Fillmyer SP | KC SIT Cody Reed RP | CIN START
LAD@ARI Ross Stripling RP | LAD START Zack Greinke SP | ARI START
MIA@WAS Wei-Yin Chen SP | MIA START Kyle McGowin SP | WAS SIT
MIL@STL Jhoulys Chacin SP | MIL START John Gant RP | STL START
NYY@TB Masahiro Tanaka SP | NYY START Ryne Stanek RP | TB SIT
OAK@SEA Edwn Jackson SP | OAK START Felix Hernandez SP | SEA SIT
PHI@COL Nick Pivetta SP | PHI START German Marquez SP | COL START
PIT@CHC Ivan Nova SP | PIT START Jose Quintana SP | CHC START
SD@SF Luis Perdomo SP | SD SIT Casey Kelley SP | SF SIT
TEX@LAA Yohander Mendez RP | TEX SIT Andrew Heaney SP | LAA START
PROBABLE PITCHERS - THURSDAY (9/27/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
ATL@NYM Julio Teheran SP | ATL START Jason Vargas SP | NYM START
CLE@KC Josh Tomlin SP | CLE SIT Glenn Sparkman RP | KC SIT
DET@MIN Francisco Liriano RP | DET START Gabriel Moya RP | MIN SIT
HOU@BAL Gerrit Cole SP | HOU START David Hess P | BAL SIT
NYY@TB CC Sabathia SP | NYY START Jaime Schultz SP | TB SIT
PHI@COL Jake Arrieta SP | PHI START Antonio Senzatela SP | COL SIT
PIT@CHC Trevor Williams SP | PIT START Jon Lester SP | CHC START
TEX@SEA Ariel Jurado SP | TEX SIT Marco Gonzales SP | SEA START
PROBABLE PITCHERS - FRIDAY (9/28/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
ARI@SD Patrick Corbin SP | ARI START Eric Lauer SP | SD START
ATL@PHI Mike Foltynewicz SP | ATL START Jerad Eickhoff SP | PHI SIT
CHW@MIN Reynaldo Lopez SP | CHW START Jose Berrios SP | MIN START
CHW@MIN Lucas Giolito SP | CHW START Chase De Jong SP | MIN SIT
CLE@KC Mike Clevinger SP | CLE START Ian Kennedy SP | KC START
DET@MIL Jordan Zimmermann SP | DET SIT Zach Davies SP | MIL START
HOU@BAL Gerrit Cole SP | HOU START David Hess SP | BAL SIT
LAD@SF Hyun-Jin Ryu SP | LAD START Madison Bumgarner SP | SF START
MIA@NYM Jose Urena SP | MIA START Corey Oswalt P | NYM SIT
NYY@BOS J.A. Happ SP | NYY START Brian Johnson SP | BOS SIT
OAK@LAA Mike Fiers SP | OAK START Jaime Barria SP | LAA SIT
PIT@CIN Nick Kingham SP | PIT START Anthony DeSclafani SP | CIN START
STL@CHC Adam Wainwright SP | STL START Kyle Hendricks SP | CHC START
TEX@SEA Martin Perez SP | TEX SIT Wade LeBlanc RP | SEA START
TOR@TB Thomas Pannone P | TOR START Tyler Glasnow SP | TB START
WAS@COL Joe Ross SP | WAS SIT Kyle Freeland SP | COL START
PROBABLE PITCHERS - SATURDAY (9/29/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
ARI@SD Zack Godley SP | ARI START Jacob Nix SP | SD SIT
ATL@PHI Anibal Sanchez SP | ATL START Aaron Nola SP | PHI START
CHW@MIN Carlos Rodon SP | CHW START Kyle Gibson SP | MIN START
CLE@KC Corey Kluber SP | CLE START Jake Junis SP | KC SIT
DET@MIL Daniel Norris SP | DET SIT Wade Miley SP | MIL START
HOU@BAL Justin Verlander SP | HOU START Dylan Bundy SP | BAL SIT
HOU@BAL Dallas Keuchel SP | HOU START Yefry Ramirez SP | BAL SIT
LAD@SF Clayton Kershaw SP | LAD START Dereck Rodriguez SP | SF START
MIA@NYM Trevor Richards SP | MIA SIT Steven Matz SP | NYM START
NYY@BOS Domingo German SP | NYY SIT Nathan Eovaldi SP | BOS START
OAK@LAA Liam Hendriks SP | OAK SIT Tyler Skaggs SP | LAA SIT
PIT@CIN Jameson Taillon SP | PIT START Michael Lorenzen SP | CIN SIT
STL@CHC Miles Mikolas SP | STL START Cole Hamels SP | CHC START
TEX@SEA Adrian Sampson RP | TEX SIT James Paxton SP | SEA START
TOR@TB Ryan Borucki RP | TOR START Blake Snell SP | TB START
WAS@COL Stephen Strasburg SP | WAS START Jon Gray SP | COL START
PROBABLE PITCHERS - SUNDAY (9/30/18)
GAME VISITING STARTER START/SIT HOME STARTER START/SIT
ARI@SD Robbie Ray SP | ARI START Joey Lucchesi RP | SD START
ATL@PHI Kevin Gausman SP | ATL START Roger Suarez SP | PHI SIT
CHW@MIN Dylan Covey SP | CHW SIT Zack Littell SP | MIN SIT
CLE@KC Carlos Carrasco SP | CLE START Eric Skoglund SP | KC SIT
DET@MIL Spencer Turnbull SP | DET SIT TBD TBD
HOU@BAL TBD TBD TBD TBD
LAD@SF Walker Buehler SP | LAD START Andrew Suarez SP | SF START
MIA@NYM Sandy Alcantara RP | MIA START Noah Syndergaard SP | NYM START
NYY@BOS TBD TBD Rick Porcello SP | BOS START
OAK@LAA TBD TBD Matt Shoemaker RP | LAA SIT
PIT@CIN TBD TBD Sal Romano RP | CIN SIT
STL@CHC Jack Flaherty SP | STL START Mike Montgomery RP | CHC START
TEX@SEA Yovani Gallardo SP | TEX SIT Roenis Elias SP | SEA START
TOR@TB Marco Estrada SP | TOR SIT TBD TBD
WAS@COL TBD TBD TBD TBD

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Are You For Real? Surprising SP Starts (Week 26)

Welcome to our surprising starts series. Every week we’ll be going over a few surprising starting pitcher performances around the majors to determine whether these starts were smoke and mirrors or something more.

This week we saw the revitalization of another veteran pitcher that was once left for dead. We also saw a young fireballer carry his minor league dominance into the majors.

Adam Wainwright is turning back the clock with two straight good starts, while Josh James is bringing the heat and the strikeouts for Houston in a starter/relief role.

 

The Jury Is Out

Adam Wainwright, St. Louis Cardinals

2018 Stats (prior to this start): 29 IP, 3.72 ERA, 5.05 FIP, 1.6 K/BB ratio

09/22 vs. SF: 6.1 IP, 8 H, 4 ER, 0 BB, 6 K

Admittedly, a four-run, eight-hit outing is kind of a low bar for a good start. However he only allowed one extra base hit, a double, and had six strikeouts to no walks. His start before this one was even better, where Wainwright pitched six shutout innings with nine strikeouts against the Dodgers. Coming into the season Wainwright was seen as an impediment to younger, more exciting pitchers in the Cardinals system but now is looking rejuvenated. Wainwright still has the same five-pitch repertoire he’s had for the past five years, but he is throwing his curveball more than ever this season. He is also using his cutter as much as his fastball, leaning largely on a curve, cutter, sinker combo.

At its peak Wainwright’s curveball was considered one of the best in the game, and while overall he’s lost both velocity and movement on the pitch he’s experienced a renaissance with the pitch this year. In 2017 batters crushed the curveball for .282 BA and .160 ISO, Wainwright’s worse season with the pitch. That year he was throwing it 72.5 MPH, the spin rate was down nearly 1000 RPM, and it lost one and a half inches of drop compared to this season. Wainwright has regained velocity and movement with the pitch and it has been reflected in the results. Batters are hitting .167 with a .212 xwOBA and 11.6% whiff rate against Wainwright’s curveball. Over these past two starts Wainwright has 27 swinging strikes in total, 15 of which came by way of the curveball. Perhaps injuries were affecting Wainwright more than we realized and instead of being completely washed up he needed to get healthy.

Shifting away from his fastball towards the cutter has been a good move for Wainwright, since he doesn’t have an effective fastball anymore. His sparsely used four-seamer has been demolished for a .500 BA and .417 ISO by opposing hitters. His two-seamer has technically performed better, but batters are still hitting .341 with a .220 ISO against it. He is averaging a career low 89.1 MPH with his fastball and batters are sending it back even harder with an 89.8 MPH average exit velocity. Wainwright has the old-pitcher problem where his breaking ball is still effective, but his fastball has deteriorated beyond the point of usefulness. Wainwright was never a fastball-heavy pitcher, but this year he is throwing it only 36.8% of the time, the first time he has been below 40% in his career. Pitcher’s with bad fastballs can succeed, with Masahiro Tanaka being one of the most prominent examples, but even Tanaka has his share of problems with the longball. There is a hard cap on the ceiling of pitchers with bad fastballs, and they can also be prone to huge blowups. Masahiro Tanaka, Dylan Bundy, and Jordan Zimmermann are a few examples of varying quality that demonstrate the blowup potential. Of those pitchers Wainwright is most similar to Zimmermann. Zimmermann had a great stretch of starts in June and July this season by eschewing his fastball for his slider, but things eventually caught up with Zimmermann.

Verdict:

Wainwright’s curveball is still an effective pitch and plus breaking ball, but his fastball is severely diminished compared to his prime. As a streamer Wainwright is a passable option, though his final start is not a great matchup, coming Friday against the Cubs. If the Cubs have the division wrapped up by then and rest their starters then Wainwright would be fine, but otherwise he should be avoided. Depending on where he ends up Wainwright could be an interesting $1 player in 2019.

 

Josh James, Houston Astros

2018 Stats (Triple-A): 92.2 IP, 3.40 ERA, 3.39 FIP, 3.41 K/BB ratio

09/18 vs. SEA: 5.1 IP, 4 H, 0 ER, 2 BB, 7 K

James was a strikeout machine in the minors, striking out 41% of batters at Double-A and 35% at Triple-A. He’s only pitched 16 innings in the majors thus far, but has 24 strikeouts in that time. James is currently ranked as the Astros’ number six ranked prospect by MLB Pipeline, but with four pitchers ahead of him he still had to beat out some talent to reach the majors. James is notable for his big fastball, which averaged 97.4 MPH in this start and reached 100.4 MPH. Along with the fastball James throws a slider and changeup, two pitches that have generated double-digit whiff rates for him. Although James’ slider was more highly regarded by scouts, his changeup has been the biggest source of strikeouts thus far. Unlike many pitchers, James does not throw his changeup exclusively to opposite handed batters. He throws it to righties when ahead in the count 35% of the time. Here’s an example of the pitch to a right-handed batter from this start.

It has solid movement down and away and can look more like a slider at times. It fooled Nelson Cruz there, but Cruz isn’t alone. Batters have chased James’s changeup 50.1% of the time and the pitch has a 21.2% whiff rate.

His slider hasn’t gotten quite the same number of strikeouts with just a 13% whiff rate and 15% chase rate, both low for a slider. The pitch does have above average spin at 2452 RPM compared to the league average of 2090. It also has slightly better horizontal and vertical movement than the average slider. It’s a little loopier than one might expect from a pitcher with James’ velocity. Here is perhaps his best slider, which came in his first start.

He doesn’t attack down and away with it, nor does it break that sharply. The pitch certainly has room to grow as James develops, but this pitch might not be a big source of strikeouts in its current iteration. That’s fine considering batters have only mustered a .111 BA and .211 xwOBA against the pitch. James is getting more than enough strikeouts from his fastball and changeup anyway.

James’ biggest issue is one that plagues many pitchers in this mold, control problems. He had walk rates greater than 10% at both Double-A and Triple-A before his promotion and has walked six batters in 16 innings in the majors so far. Batters not chasing his slider contributes to this problem. As previously mentioned it only has a 15% chase rate, which is even worse considering he only has a 43.5% zone rate with the pitch and a 26% swing rate overall. Batters only make contact 50% of the time, but they can lay off James’ slider. Given how James’ slider has performed the best move for a hitter is to abstain from swinging.

Verdict:

Outside of control and small sample size there isn’t much reason to doubt what James is doing right now. He’ll run into trouble like all young and inexperienced pitchers do, but the stuff looks legit. James’ final start is scheduled for Tuesday in Toronto, and he is a good streaming option even though Toronto has a .324 wOBA as a team against right-handed pitching this season. There is also a slim chance that James could get a second start in Baltimore over the weekend if Charlie Morton can’t make his scheduled start. Morton left early in his last outing on Sunday, and while he is expected to make that start the Astros may have the division locked up at that point and won’t risk Morton’s health in a meaningless game. For 2019 James could compete for a rotation spot since both Morton and Dallas Keuchel are free agents. If he is a starter James would be a great sleeper next year. Otherwise he would probably be used in a role similar to Brad Peacock or Collin McHugh out of the bullpen.

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Two-Start Starting Pitcher Streamers: 9/24-9/30

Well, this is it, the final two-start streaming pitcher write-up of 2018. Thank you for being part of this ride and I hope I’ve helped you all, for at least a week or two. Now, let’s try to get you that championship!

This week’s pitchers are a little more reliable. Typically, I aim for pitchers who allow a maximum of three earned runs on a given outing. For this final piece, I’ve aimed for two runs, or less, allowed in the recent history of the streamers.

In last week’s post, Steven Matz (5 IP, 0 ER, and 4 K), Wade Miley (5 IP, 0 ER, and 2 K), and Andrew Suarez (7.2 IP, 2 ER, and 4 K) were the highlights. Since this piece is posted early on Saturdays, I hope I didn’t jinx these arms for their second start of the week.

 

Pitcher Streamers - Under 50% Owned

Chase Anderson, MIL (49% owned)

Probable opponents: @ STL, vs. DET

Anderson continues to be under-owned in fantasy baseball. Let’s all do this man a favor and make him 100% owned in fantasy leagues for the final week of the season. He’s allowed two earned runs, or less, in six of the last 10 performances and Anderson has punched out at least five batters in four games during that span. The Tigers are the second team he’ll face this week. Detroit is 29th in team wOBA (.293) against right-handed pitchers and 25th in runs scored (599 runs in 153 games) this season.

Jake Odorizzi, MIN (40% owned)

Probable opponents: vs. DET, vs. CWS

Odorizzi also faces the Tigers this week. In 2018, Odorizzi is 1-0 with a 4.41 ERA in three outings against Detroit. On the bright side, he’s struck out 17 Tigers in 16.1 innings of work this season. His last start was even against the Motor City Kitties (6.1 IP, 2 ER, an 6 K). As for more of his recent history, Odorizzi has allowed two earned runs, or less, in six of the last 10 appearances. The White Sox are also on the docket for Odorizzi. He’s struck out 23 White Sox in only 16.1 innings this year.

Derek Holland, SF (31% owned)

Probable opponents: vs. SD, vs. LAD

If you are looking for strikeouts, then Holland is your guy. This season, he’s pitched 19.2 innings against the Padres with 19 strikeouts and 18 innings against the Dodgers with 21 strikeouts. However, his 3.57 season-long ERA doesn’t represent his starts against those two divisional foes. San Diego has scored 12 runs (5.49 ERA) and Los Angeles has tallied nine earned runs (4.50 ERA) against Holland this year.

 

Pitcher Streamers - Under 25% Owned

Austin Gomber, STL (21% owned)

Probable opponents: vs. MIL, @ CHC

Remove one bad game against the Dodgers (3 IP, 7 ER, and 3 K) and you have a solid pitcher. Gomber has allowed two earned runs, or less, in seven of the last 10 appearances and punched out at least five batters in five of the last nine games. Milwaukee is first on the schedule for Gomber. They’ve struck out 1,376 times this season, which is fifth-most in baseball.

Matt Harvey, CIN (18% owned)

Probable opponents: vs. KC, vs. PIT

Harvey hates facing the Brewers. They’ve been on the schedule twice in the past five outings and each one has ended poorly for Harvey. He has a combined 9.1 IP with 12 ER. Thankfully, Milwaukee isn’t on the menu this week. Instead, he gets Kansas City and Pittsburgh. Both teams are in the bottom 11 in team wOBA against right-handed pitchers and in the bottom nine in runs scored this season. Also, Harvey is pitching both games at Great American Ballpark. This year, he’s 5-1 with a 4.37 ERA at the GABP.

Framber Valdez, HOU (12% owned)

Probable opponents: @ TOR, @ BAL

It’s the final streamer! Cue the Europe track! Valdez has struck out 14 batters in the past 19.1 innings, all while allowing five total earned runs. The young lefty will get two more turns in the Astros rotation to end the regular season. Baltimore is 30th in team wOBA (.276) against southpaws and Toronto is 22nd in the same category (.301 wOBA). The Orioles are also 28th in runs scored (581 runs in 152 games). Also, this season, righties are batting .197 against Valdez and lefties are only managing a .136 AVG against him.

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Points Leagues (H2H) Waiver Wire Adds and Streamers - Week 26

Welcome back for another week of advice for points league waiver wire moves. This segment will include waiver wire adds, drops, and streaming pitchers for the upcoming week. This article will be geared specifically toward points leagues. Every points league is different, so keep that in mind. Walks and extra base hits are more valuable, whereas AVG and ERA are not important, so consider that as well.

Some players will be suggested as streamers (while they are hot), or as rest-of-season adds (ride them all year).

As always, feel free to follow and message me on Twitter @BlakeSullivanFF for any fantasy advice or for further reasoning with this segment. Without further ado, let's take a look at some players that you should either add or drop.

 

Points League Players to Add 

Jorge Polanco (SS, MIN) - 10% owned

Jorge Polanco has been on fire lately. He's nine for his last 20 at-bats. He has two homers in that time as well. He's hitting .319 this month. Look for him to continue his hot streak this week. He has a .334 wOBA this year. He has some speed upside, but don't expect him to steal a bunch of bases this week. He's slashing .287/.342/.429.

Harrison Bader (OF, STL) - 24% owned

Harrison Bader is going to be key for the St. Louis Cardinals making a playoff run. If the Cardinals keep batting Bader at the bottom of the order it could hurt him some, but he has a good chance of stealing bases, and with the pitcher behind him he can be bunted into scoring position often. Bader has 15 stolen bases and 12 home runs. Bader has cooled off and is only hitting .218 this month, but he can turn it around easily enough.

Alex Gordon (OF, KC) - 24% owned

Alex Gordon has been playing everyday, but the Kansas City Royals gave him a day off last week, so he should be good to go all week. He has 11 home runs and 12 stolen bases this year. He hasn't done a whole lot due to the situation in Kansas City, but he has 53 runs and 49 RBI. Gordon is eight for his last 26 at-bats with four doubles. He has seven RBI in that time span, so look for him to keep that rolling this week.

 

Points League Pitchers to Stream

Adam Wainwright (SP, STL) - Friday 9/28/18 vs. CHC - 15% owned

The St. Louis Cardinals are going to look to starting pitcher Adam Wainwright in the last couple games of the season. Adam Wainwright hasn't been himself the last few years, but when the Cardinals need him the most he comes through in vintage form like he did last week. He'll be facing the Chicago Cubs this week who will want to end the Cardinals playoff hopes in an important series. He struck out nine batters while only allowing two hits over six innings. He has a 3.72 ERA this season. He has a career 3.34 ERA in September. His placement and movement was perfect last week. Look for him to pitch deep into this game with a lot of strikeouts.

Reynaldo Lopez (SP, CWS) - Wednesday 9/21/18 vs. CLE - 42% owned

Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Reynaldo Lopez has gone seven innings deep in four of his last five starts. He has at least six strikeouts in each of those games, and one game he had 10. His matchup this week isn't ideal, but he has been doing well against good opponents. Lopez has a 4.05 ERA which isn't great, but lately he has been on fire. He has a 7.06 K/9 but in reality he does better than some pitchers because he goes deeper into games. Look for him to continue his streak of good pitching this week.

Derek Holland (SP, SF) - Monday 9/24/18 vs. SD - 38% owned

Derek Holland has been a very solid pitcher for the San Francisco Giants. He gets the benefit of two starts this week which gives him a higher ceiling. He probably wont score many points in either of his contests, but he has a very safe floor. He has a 3.57 ERA this year. He has an impressive 9.07 K/9 this year as well. Look for him to put up a very helpful point total for your season finale.

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Hitter Streamers (Week 26) - Head-to-Head Leagues

Welcome back to my hitting streamers column for Week 26, taking a look at hitters to add or stream off the waiver wire for this week's scheduled games.

To keep things simple, I pick from players who are 50% owned or less and who play at least seven games in the week.  If someone jumps off the page at me as a less than seven game player, I may make an exception, but otherwise, the advantage in a number of games dictates my choices.

Streaming can be a valuable tool, by allowing you to feast on favorable pitching matchups and simply have your hitters play more games than your opponents' hitters. If you have the roster space, streaming a hitter can be useful not only to fill a vacant lineup spot but also to fill in for someone who has five games that week or faces tough matchups. In 5x5 leagues, four of the five hitting categories are counting stats, making the value of extra games significant. Streaming also can allow you to target a specific category of need. This week there is a mediocre pool of seven-game streamers. Let's dive in for the last time this season.

 

Bats to Stream and Start in Week 26

Jorge Polanco (SS, MIN) - 13% owned

Polanco is just 25, and he has a career line of .271/23/120/138/23 in 278 games. This year in 67 games he has a line of .287/6/33/33/5. While questions obviously remain after his suspension to start the year, it appears that his performance is again an asset in 2018. He looks to be a steady producer across the board. Facing favorable pitching matchups this week, he could provide five-category production.

Jason Kipnis (2B/OF, CLE) - 35% owned

The Indians now have Josh Donaldson at third base and Jose Ramirez at second base, but Kipnis has continued to play. For his career, he has hit significantly better against righties. He has continued to hit better against them this year, and he faces seven this week. Even though his average has been disappointing on the year, he has a line of .229/17/62/72/7. With a history of stolen bases and occasional pop, he should be able to provide in all five categories against the favorable matchups this week.

Willy Adames (2B/SS, TB) - 23% owned

The 23 year-old Adames continues to appear on the list. In under half a season of games (76), he has a line of .268/10/40/30/6. In the minors, he has shown double-digit power and stolen base production combined with favorable ratings from scouts. The righty has hit both lefties and righties in his young career, and he should face decent pitching matchups this week. Start him for well-rounded production.

Yonder Alonso (1B, CLE) - 35% owned

Alonso should face seven righties this week, and he has a line of .248/19/44/60/0 in 367 at bats against them this year. As the season winds down he could certainly see a day off here and there, but his power combined with the favorable matchups make him a worthy power source on the week. You should not expect a good average from him, but if you need power and run production he is a good bet.

 

Kevin Kiermaier (OF, TB) - 27% owned

Kiermaier is a fantasy asset. In the age of the declining stolen base, he has stolen 47 over the last three years (in just 287 games). He also has 37 homers in that span. This year, in approximately half a season of games, he has 10 steals and seven homers. Even though he faces three lefties this week and does not hit them as well, he is a good option for speed and power to go along with some run-scoring ability.

Avisail Garcia (OF, CHW) - 24% owned

The White Sox do not face the best pitching matchups this week, but Garcia has posted too impressive of a line the past two seasons to be off the list. Last year, in 136 games, he batted .330/18/75/80/5. This year, he is only batting .234, but he has 18 homers, 45 RBIs, 45 runs and three steals in just 85 games. The power and run production is too good not to play, and the batting average should bounce back. Even in a tough week, he is worth a start.

Luke Voit (1B, NYY) - 32% owned

In 30 games with the Yankees, Voit is batting .320 with 10 homers. While the 27 year-old will obviously not keep up that pace, he had a career .930 OPS (.314 with 23 homers) in 150 AAA games, and he batted .297 with 20 homers in 136 AA games. He can hit. He should face some tough pitching on the week against Tampa Bay’s innovative pitching staff and the Red Sox. Nevertheless, he is worth a flier due to his pure hitting ability.

 

 

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